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Is it fixable?

Discussion in 'Flashlights & Other Illumination Devices' started by ItJustDiz, Jul 12, 2016.

  1. ItJustDiz

    ItJustDiz Loaded Pockets

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    I have a Fenix LD22 that seems to have been fried on the tailcap end.. corrosion at the base of the spring and around the opening a little.

    Anyone have experience with fixing this and is it worth it??

    Cheers,
    D
     
  2. ZMZ67

    ZMZ67 Loaded Pockets

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    If it is just corrosion start by cleaning it,try CAIG DeoxIT or something similar. If cleaning fails you may be able to buy a spare tail switch. They used to sell spare tail switches but I don't know if they are now,search different Fenix vendors.
     
  3. 0dBm

    0dBm Loaded Pockets

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    Any thing is fixable. Utilize enough resources and it WILL become repaired. Do you really wish to repair it knowing that there are others that can be had brand-new in lieu of the amount of time & resources you WILL spend to have that one repaired?
     
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  4. jag-engr
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    jag-engr Semper Bufo!
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    Were using alkaleak batteries? :eek:

    The only time I have seen corrosion occur in a battery tube was when an alkaline battery leaked. I Two-cell AA lights are especially subject to this, it seems.

    I usually don't leave alkaline batteries in a light when not in use, but I once forgot some in an older Fenix light. I disassembled the clicky, cleaned it out with alcohol, and reassembled it. It worked fine. Granted, there was relatively minor damage to the spring or retainer ring. The corrosion had just broken the electrical path.

    If you clean out the corrosion and the damage to the ring and spring is pretty light, it should resume working again. If there has been much corrosion, though, you're further ahead to just by a new switch.
     
  5. Blackheart

    Blackheart Loaded Pockets

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    This^^^. Had a single-AA Fenix light that I had neglected with an alkaline battery left inside. The battery leaked and pretty much destroyed the tail switch (which is why it's only NiMH and lithiums for me now). I cleaned out the battery tube and got a replacement (used) tail switch from a CPF member (who sent it to me free of charge THANKS!). Back to being a working light. Gave it to a friend who's very happy with it and uses it often.

    Too often we just chuck stuff that we don't want to deal with. I'm naturally averse to throwing out anything that still has some useful life to it.

    BTW: The leaky battery manufacturer had a "we will replace your flashlight if our batteries leak" warranty. Called them up. They asked for the expiration date and lot # of the battery and asked me how much the light cost. I searched online and found the best price for that model (it was still current). Guy I spoke with was a bit surprised by what a decent flashlight costs, but they sent me a check for that amount and didn't even ask me to send them the afflicted light or leaky battery. Used the money to buy another (better) light.
     
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  6. ItJustDiz

    ItJustDiz Loaded Pockets

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    Thanks guys... Yes, alkaline batteries. Opps.

    I contacted Fenix and they want me to ship them the light and have their service dept. take care of it. Not really with my time and shipping cost.

    I've taken the clicky apart, cleaned off the corrosion (more than I thought) best I could and re-assembled. No glow. Now to contemplate the new cap at $13 or just put that $$ toward a new light.
     
  7. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

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    If you are a bit of a diy nut you can also just replace the switch itself, its like a $1 part. Take apart, desolder old switch, solder on new switch and presto!
     
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  8. jag-engr
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    jag-engr Semper Bufo!
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    Are you sure that you have the retainer inside the tailcap tight enough? It needs to be pretty snug to work consistently.

    The LD22 is an awesome light. I'd try replacing the switch. You probably don't need a new tailcap. You might try Fenix Store - they may help you find just the switch.
     
  9. jag-engr
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    jag-engr Semper Bufo!
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    I don't think there's any solder involved in a Fenix LD22 switch. I think it's just a retainer ring.
     
  10. ItJustDiz

    ItJustDiz Loaded Pockets

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    Fairly certain it's all back together just the way it was before (corrosion or damage included)..

    According to the fenix tactical parts store, Fenix Replacement Switch TS01 is what I need, and it's a $13 part. I may respond to the warranty email I received and see if they'll just send me that part.
     
  11. jag-engr
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    jag-engr Semper Bufo!
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    What brand of alkalines were you using? Duracell and Energizer have been known to pay for damage caused by their cells leaking, especially if you took pictures.
     
  12. jabe1

    jabe1 Loaded Pockets

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    Did you try to bypass the switch with a piece of wire or a paper clip to insure the light is still actually working?
     
  13. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

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    What people see as a single part (clicky) is a module consisting out of three parts; A clicky switch, a pcb and a spring all soldered together and all purchasable separately. As a complete drop in module you can find these depending on brand between 10-30 bucks, however every one of those three components only costs about a dollar and the board and spring really do not break. So if you get a bag of switches youll be sorted for many many years if you can solder. Ive done this more often than i care to admit (but in my case its mainly burned out switches in modded lights).
     
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  14. ItJustDiz

    ItJustDiz Loaded Pockets

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    I was able to play around/firmly press (and do the ol' tap it on your hand) and get the light to come on with a very firm press of the switch. as soon as I depress the switch to click off, the light goes out (and does not easily come back on).

    Could this be just a switch issue, or even a bad connection with the retainer ring or something like that? Does that play part in the electrical path?

    While I'm messing with this thing, is there anything ELSE I should be playing with, replacing or upgrading?
     
  15. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

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    The retainer ring is part of the electrical path on most lights but the contact surfaces there are so large that its nearly impossible to break the path there as long as you tighten it down properly (something a lot of people seem to be unable to do, invest in some circlip pliers when in doubt). Critical point #1 is the actual contact point inside the plastic switch, once that corrodes (aka 'rusts') the light will operate sporadically, inconsistent and unreliable at best. The spring can also corrode but that's something you can clean or even sand down slightly (only the part that touches the butt of the cell needs to be clean). Solder points are actually always under pressure and thus hardly ever come undone by anything other than too much power (modded lights).
    [​IMG]
    Elictrocity goes from the cell through the coiled spring (soldered to center part right image) through the middle path on the little round circuit board into the switch. Once the switch activates (mounted on the center in the left image) the center that holds the spring gets connected to the outer one. The retainer ring that holds this board in place does so up against that very outer ring and thus provides the electrical connection between it and the flashlight body where the power continues its way through the threads of the tailcap (also part of the path, make sure thats not too filthy either) all the way up into the business end of the light.

    Honestly, all parts on the back end of the light can be fixed by cleaning or sanding apart from the switch and that's like i said a one dollar part (if you buy in bulk like i do that price goes down to 12-20 cents depending on switch type). To check the functionality of the light itself just bypass the switch like suggested before; Remove tailcap, insert battery (orientated correctly) and grab a paperclip of key or anything metal really and give the battery a little push down the tube while also touching the side of the flashlight body at the same time. That metal object now functions as the switch, if the light works the problem is in the tailcap for sure.

    Other things to do while tinkering with lights are;
    -Cleaning! Rag, elbow grease.
    -Lube! Put some love on the threads, non-acidic greases are best for this.
    -New o-rings?
    -New different color tailcap boot?

    All optional really. Im a firm believer of the dont fix whats not broken philosophy.
     
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  16. reppans

    reppans Loaded Pockets

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    If you own a DMM, you can use the continuity function to test and zero in where along the electrical path (as Westerdutch mentions) the connection is breaking down.
     
  17. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

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    This works fine for low current applications, however i would not bet my life on these readings for high power lights. DMM continuity will give a good indication on a fully properly broken electrical path but if it passes continuity it's still no guarantee that its actually solid.
     
  18. ItJustDiz

    ItJustDiz Loaded Pockets

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    Shortened quote simply for a tag... This is all so helpful, thank you.

    The light is at work and I'm currently at home, but what if I function test by bypassing the switch and get nothing? Issue would be in the head of the light?

    There doesn't seem to be any corrosion at the head but that's almost a little hard to believe considering the corrosion on the tail end. I also can't seem to figure out how to further disassemble the head beyond unscrewing it from the body. There is, I think, two other seams but they don't want to unscrew.

    I have cleaned everything visible in the tail cap, board, spring, threads, etc. so if the issue is not the switch, it must be in the business end of the light. I'm assuming that means I have a bigger problem as well?
    Thanks again.
     
  19. reppans

    reppans Loaded Pockets

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    Well with what must be a half dozen connection points through the tube and clicky, if they all pass, then the OP is really no worse off than now. However, if one leg does fail, then he will have his answer.

    As Jabe also suggested above, I'd also do a full tube/clicky bypass test to see if the head is fully functional (just head, battery, and wire).
     
  20. reppans

    reppans Loaded Pockets

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    You got this post in while I was typing. Yes, do THIS bypass test with just the head, test all modes, if that works, then do a similar test with the head and battery tube connected. If that works, then it's definitely the clicky.
     
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