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Insulating a flashlight?

Discussion in 'Do-It-Yourself & Gear Modifications' started by vivek16, Dec 4, 2011.

  1. vivek16

    vivek16 Loaded Pockets

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    Hey all,

    I've been commuting with my bike a lot recently (in minnesota) and I have a 4sevens Quark aa2 mounted on my helmet for night time. There's been some nights with the temperatures down in the low 20's (F) where the beam intensity seems to drop drastically. This will go back up once I'm indoors usually. Am I just imagining this with the streetlights? I can still see things with the light it provides when this happens but it seems so much brighter when I start riding than 10 minutes in. What could I do to keep it warmer if that is the problem? I'm thinking about making a tyvek and fleece sheath for it.

    Any ideas?

    -vivek
     
  2. RonReagan

    RonReagan Loaded Pockets

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    You could make a neoprene sleeve pretty easily. You could buy a cheap bottle insulator and use the neoprene from that.

    What batteries are you using? Some chemistries don't jive well with certain temperatures.
     
  3. vivek16

    vivek16 Loaded Pockets

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    Just standard alkaline batteries. I already have a bunch of tyvek and fleece lying around so I might try and rig something with that. Maybe I should just spend some money on a bike-specific light.
     
  4. adimag

    adimag Loaded Pockets

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    Your best bet would be to switch to lithium batteries. They have a much better tolerance for low temperatures. I'm not quite sure how well insulating the light is going to work.
     
  5. vivek16

    vivek16 Loaded Pockets

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    Ok, I'll try that. A diy light insulation sheath would look a bit goofy anyway. Not that a light ziptied to my helmet doesn't. :p
     
  6. Mcameron

    Mcameron Loaded Pockets

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    well making a fleece insulating sleeve wont do too much......as the flashlight isnt putting out any (significant) heat to get trapped in the insulation........


    what WOULD work is if you made a sleeve for the flashlight.....and then made a small pocket for a handwarmer.......those should get plenty warm enough to keep the flashlight at an 'optimal' temperature.
     
  7. Valerian

    Valerian Tea-powered admin

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    Switch to Eneloops or Recykos or other LSD NiMH cells and there won't be any need to insulate it. Lithiums will also work, but will be more expensive in the long run.
     
  8. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

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    This is the way to go, alkalines are baaaaaad anyways but they suck especially hard at lowered temperatures.

    For electronics the general rule is; the lower the temperature the better.... for most chemical reactions higher temperatures are better but some reactions just run better under a wide temperature range.

    I myself cant wait for it to start freezing... this will give me a chance to run my crazy lights for a bit longer when im outside :D