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Infant First Aid

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by Tromba, Jan 16, 2015.

  1. Tromba

    Tromba Loaded Pockets

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    Parents out there. I have a 1 month old. I have been looking to build out a small baby first aid kit for my daddy diaper bag. Does anyone have recommendations on what to include? I have a well stocked diaper bag so I am just looking for first aid suggestions.

    Off the cuff I was thinking:
    a few bandaids
    infant tylenol
     
  2. goosefacer
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    goosefacer EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Wipes, wipes, wipes. Most times there isn't much you can do medication wise for an infant so keeping clean hands and wiping runny noses is the most you can do. Maybe you can find a small bottle of Pedialyte - my kids both love that when they're sick and it's great for keeping them hydrated.
     
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  3. Eagle Scout
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    Had tailored my FAK for our newborn as well. Couple of recommendations...

    Do a search on Infant CPR and/or choking, there are printable cards with visuals you can drop in your bag. Good reminder to see them each time you open your kit. Different processes for infants.

    Amazon has forehead thermometer strips for taking temperature when out and about. Very thin, small, and light. If you're carrying infant tylenol, would strongly recommend these.

    Hand sanitizer, for the adults. We are picking up way more nasty stuff on our hands than baby is typically exposed to. No sense in causing illness inadvertently.

    Good luck, and congrats on your little one. :)
     
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  4. iangineer

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    Congrats! I'm a new Dad, too. My son is six weeks old. I've actually been meaning to create a similar thread. If you don't mind, I'm gonna expand your question a little bit.

    I have a very small boo-boo/relief kit in the back zipper pocket of my Chums wallet and the other day I was thinking the Chums wallet might be a nice format for a more complete boo-boo/relief/FA kit for my infant. Something nice and small but could still be decked with some essentials if it didn't have cards and cash taking up most of the room. My wife is carrying a small diaper bag and we're trying to keep it nice and efficient, so I don't see anything larger than a Chums wallet making it into the bag.

    So, to be more specific to Tromba 's question: What would you guys fill up a Chums wallet with for an infant focused FAK?
     
  5. Water-Rat

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    Well, I don't have much experience in the dealing with little ones department, but:

    At least one pair of nitrile gloves... good for handling anything yucky, plus you can always blow them up with air to make a balloon if the baby gets bored.

    Bandaids, especially smaller ones.

    Gauze, thin med tape, and scissors (slip-n-snips should fit in a wallet) so you can make your own bandages as larger bandaids might not always work.

    +1 for the aforementioned wipes, though for a bag carry, a washcloth or other larger soft cloth might be a good idea in addition.

    Something to attract the baby's attention and keep them distracted while you inspect them.

    If you have CPR training, maybe a pediatric sized CPR mask, though not for a wallet FAK obviously.

    If you don't already carry a flashlight, it might be a good idea. Especially one that isn't so bright. Good for inspecting baby's hair, eyes, teeth, etc. Also, good as a toy to distract the baby, just not a bright flashlight, or you'll have a blind baby to deal with.

    Congratulations to you for 1. embarking on the great journey of parenthood and 2. being smart enough to plan ahead.

    PS If you or your spouse don't have CPR/first aid training I recommend you find a class, especially one geared towards infants.
     
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  6. geekandwife

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    My youngest is just out of the Toddler stage, but honestly the only thing I carried for infant first aid was one of the syringe nose things and stickers. Everything else can be handled with my adult kit..
     
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  7. Orlando Marquez

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    [​IMG]

    For ours... hand sanitizer, digital thermometer, infant Tylenol, baby wipes, bandaids, blanket, keychain flashlight (capture baby's attention), blanket, CPR/First Aid card.
     
  8. cowsmilk

    cowsmilk EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Congratulations on your little one!!

    Some problems that come to mind that you can solve yourself will be:

    - Diaper rash
    - light fever
    - small boo boos from movements or from fingernail scratches.
    - stuffy noses (excessive buggars)

    Some items to have to "fix" these problems
    - disposable wipes (already mentioned by goosefacer)
    - a small bottle of corn starch, for diaper rash.
    - a small tube of diaper rash ointment.
    - small band aids.
    - a small tube of triple antibiotic ointment
    - a small pair of grooming scissors for the fingernails. They grow fast and are surprisingly sharp.
    - infant fever reducer medicine. (Already mentioned)
    - a thermometer. (Already mentioned)
    - one of those bulb doohickys for cleaning out your infants nose to help with breathing.

    Too much more than this and you really should evaluate professional medical attention, as needed of course. We're not talking hypochondriac based reactions here, just a good common sense decision. I say this because it's something we experienced with our first child. If you have a good pediatrician, ask as many questions as possible. Many have a call in service to help you evaluate the severity of symptoms over the phone, prior to or instead of making an appointment.

    There will be changes to your kit as your child develops, for example when your child starts to become mobile.
     
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  9. toork

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    Mylicon! By the truck load!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk. Iii ni a
     
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  10. bleh

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    Benadryl. It's not recommended for kids under 2, but if you're out and about and suddenly find out that your kid has a severe allergy to, say, nuts, having it on hand to give a dose quick can literally be a life saver. We carried an unopened bottle in my wife's purse for 2 years just in case. The 911 operators should be able to give a dosage to help control the reaction until you can get to a care facility.
     
  11. munkynut454

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    Having read all of the replies above I cannot add a great deal.

    Lots of wipes.

    Make sure you know how to deal with a baby that is choking. Properly sure.

    If a baby is choking, you as the parent need to realise that they are robust little f**kers and can withstand back blows and chest thrusts. Google it, watch the video and ensure your partner is familiar.

    Babies most common cause of concern is choking. Or anaphylaxis - Benadryl/Epipen.

    Apart from that, congratulations... Your life (and sleep) will NEVER be the same again.
     
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  12. Paulie Walnuts

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    Being an Urgent Care instructor, I get asked this question a lot from expecting parents. I would recommend a basic CPR class and in addition to that a Standard first aid class. It is more the knowledge of what to do sometimes instead of what you carry.

    Best of luck to you!
     
  13. chaosmagnet
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    This was mentioned by cowsmilk but I have to second it: you need a bulb syringe. Infant CPR certification, appropriate OTC meds and a bulb syringe are the key components that go on top of a FAK that you would use for an adult.
     
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  14. VinceRN

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    The first things that go in any kit are training and knowledge. Hopefully you have taken infant CPR, if not do that ASAP.

    When a baby that young gets sick there is little you can do on your own. You can treat a fever with weight based doses of tylenol or ibuprofen, but a fever in a kid under about 2 months is a medical emergency and you should go to the ER after treating it. Even up to three months a fever is serious and requires a visit to your pediatrician or a clinic or ER.

    Dehydration can be deadly serious and happen quickly in babies that young too. I always carried oral re-hydration fluid, which can be given in very small amounts by syringe. There is a lot of information on the internet about oral re-hydration protocols. If you find yourself having to do this, you have to go to the ER as soon as possible.

    A bulb syringe, as others suggested, is a must. You can use that to clear the airway.

    I also always carried a tiny pair of curved iris scissors and some tiny tweezers. Sometimes strings or hairs get wrapped around little toes or fingers.

    Beyond that, little ban-aids, tape, 2x2 gaue, A&D ointment, and any medications specific to your baby that your doctor recommends.

    We carried all that in a small pouch on the side of the diaper bag, with duplicates in the stroller when our girls were little.
     
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  15. CrezyMunky

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    I have a 9 month old that has had the flu, boo boos, and so on. The always at hand kit should have a copy of the health insurance card, primary care contact info with emergency contact num, as well as all the other emergency numbers like poison control and local hospital. Those are going to be more useful than the fak, though you should have that. Cpr class is a must, but knowing what to do for allergies and other situations is helpful. I keep a sak in the diaper bag, as well as a battery op charger for our phones. Congrats and good luck!


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  16. Luis J

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    Baby oralgel or another teething pain reliever when your baby starts teething.
     
  17. chaosmagnet
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    This didn't work for beans with any of my kids.
     
  18. Tegan's Dad
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    It actually made things worse for Tegan. We tried to use it very sparingly, but a lot of the numbing affect goes in the rest of their mouth, not just the gums. With Tegan, this caused her to have trouble swallowing which made her gag and spit up. I think we tried to use it twice and gave up.

    I would recommend saline drops. Kids under a certain age can't process regular nasal spray, but if a nose is clogged with a crusty booger, a few drops of saline can help loosen it up. Then the bulb syringe can suck it out easier. They also make saline wipes (boogie wipes) that are nice if your baby has sensitive skin. Less harsh than typical baby wipes, but way more expensive.
     
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  19. karandras

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    I realise this is a bit of an old thread but,

    I don't use teething gel, as the gel spreads and numbs their tongue and whole mouth,i get the liquid version. In the uk we have anbesol & dentinox that both come in a liquid form.

    I also carry a couple of sachets of dioralyte as it's really helpful to rehydrate the little one, when they are feeling unwell / have a temp.

    Other than that we just carried the usual, nappy cream (burts bees is amazing stuff), calpol sachets (or other suitable paracetamol product), wipes, thermometer, nappy sacks, hand gel and the rest of the standard diaper bag load out.

    Andi
     
  20. Luis J

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    The teething gels worked good for my kids, but I guess everyone is a bit different.