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In your own opinion what are some items every First Aid Kit should have?

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by dudepal1510, Jan 27, 2012.

  1. muttsnutts

    muttsnutts Loaded Pockets

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    Though factually correct (2nd intercostal space, above the rib, etc)... this is absolutely RECKLESS!
    Without a Chest XR or CT, you will have no idea if the patient has a pneumothorax or even tension pneumothorax (the life threatening kind).
    Oh wait, yes you will, because you just caused it by stabbing the "victim" in the chest with that tube!!!
    You should get rid of that tube and instructions. First do no harm. This is of course directed at the manufacturer not the original poster :)
     
  2. SAKplumber
    • In Omnia Paratus

    SAKplumber EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Got it on here. Last pic is for you. Tried to get it aas focused as possible. First line is the hardest to make out so I typed it out.

    http://edcforums.com/threads/sakplumbers-edc-fak-so-far.95000/
     
  3. swatpup102

    swatpup102 Loaded Pockets

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    The number 1 item I use in my EDC FAK is......Sudafed. I can't tell ya how many times myself or someone else has had congestion for illness or allergy that makes them miserably congested, and a dose of sudafed helps out a bunch. I usually keep a separate sudafed and allergy pill (such as claritin) dose so that you aren't giving someone medicine they don't need in something such as claritin D. Not that it would hurt much, but some people react different to that stuff.
     
  4. VinnyP
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    VinnyP Loaded Pockets

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    I am not saying the treatment card is responsible or sensible but it's perfectly possible to diagnose without an Xray or Cat scan, in some circumstances and protocols it's a prophylactic treatment.
     
  5. Ted Andkilde

    Ted Andkilde Loaded Pockets

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    I have fairly limited first aid skills (basic 1st aid & CPR courses, both outdated) and rarely find myself outside cell range so my selection is pretty bare bones.

    Portable:

    -tweezers
    -bandaids
    -ibuprofen
    -tegaderm
    -steristrips
    -betadine ointment

    Sports (above plus):

    -vetwrap
    -athletic tape
    -kinesio tape
    -capcaisin (bingo dauber applicator)

    The tegaderm is really versatile as a wound dressing, can be applied directly to the wound, sticks well and removes pretty painlessly, it is fantastic for trail/road rash. Betadine ointment (generically known as povidone iodine ointment) is hands down the best disinfectant ointment I've used, polysporin is a joke in comparison, cheap too. The capcaisin is sold as an OTC arthritis treatment, burns like heck but is an amazing pain deadener for strains and sprains if you "need" to finish the game or walk/ride yourself out injured.

    Cheers, Ted
     
  6. Flight-ER-Doc

    Flight-ER-Doc Loaded Pockets

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    I perform needle and tube decompressions without CXR based on signs all the time. So do entry level medics (at least the needle decomp) in Afghanistan and Iraq, every day.

    Classic signs of tension pneumo include decreased breath sounds on one (the injured) side, tracheal deviation, and jugular veinous distension. A sucking chest wound might also be a sign. Treat the patient, not the chart or films (actually DICOM or PACS files).
     
    surgicalcric likes this.
  7. surgicalcric

    surgicalcric Empty Pockets

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    A little on the "reckless" treatment of a tension pneumo.


    To add to Doc and VinnyP's comments: Needle Decompression (ND) of suspected tension pneumothoraces are commonly performed in the field in Astan, Iraq, and other places where conflicts arise around the world by personnel with far less formal training than a military line medic or civilian paramedic for that matter. It is a skill that is easily taught and performed with varying degrees of success but one that has saved countless lives on the battlefield as unrelieved tension pneumos account for 1/3 of all battlefield deaths. ND's along and surgical crics are two of the more advanced skills that I teach to and expect every member of my team to be proficient in - being the only SF medic on the team I put my life in their hands daily. With the exception of piercing the heart and inducing cardiac tamponade or the subclavian vessels (neither of which are likely in an adult with a 10ga 2-1/2" cath properly placed) there is very little associated risk involved in performing a ND. If nothing more the ND can be used to rule out the presence of the tension pneumo thereby removing it from the diagnosis/differential dignoses and allow care to be directed towards other differentials and while not used in common practice it has been used in the field and clinical settings for years. Tube Thoracostomies are also performed in the field when evac times are going to be delayed or the treating SOF medic is running out of appropriate sized (10-14 ga) catheters to continue treating the patient(s) through more conservative means (NDs).

    As for the tension pneumo itself, the only signs/symptoms necessary to warrant a ND are thoracic trauma (penetrating or blunt) or penetrating abdominal trauma with a high index of suspicion for diaphragmatic and thoracic involvement and progressively increased Work Of Breathing (WOB). Increased WOB can be confirmed by the patients statements of such if he is conscious, comparative analysis of the depth and rate of breathing since injury, or resistance if the patient is being ventilated (manually or ventilator.) Auscultating breath sounds or percussing the chest wall is often difficult at best even in the most controlled environments (good hearing, good stethoscope, quiet room) and JVD and tracheal shift are late findings - if using those as justification you may as well add apnea and pulselessness to the list; they will follow shortly.

    However I wholeheartedly concur that CXR, FAST, or CT are gold standard(s) for confirming the presence and/or efficacy in treatment of a tension pneumo. They are however luxuries the patient doesn't always have time to wait for

    All that being said, if the patient in the civilian world is in close proximity to a medical treatment facility (ER not MD office) the best course of action would be to transport them there. While in the backwoods hunting or hiking that isnt always an option and so one must weigh the pros and cons of performing such interventions while "in God's country." To each his own, but I would take my chances rather than watch a friend die...
     
    Last edited by surgicalcric, Jun 9, 2012
  8. medic2807

    medic2807 Loaded Pockets

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    Waiting for a chest x-ray to confirm a tension pneumo is tantamount to gut tubing a patient and not recognizing it, and will result in a verbal bitch slapping by your state trauma review board. That's why they invented stethoscopes.

    Sent from my SCH-I405 using Tapatalk
     
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  9. Dok J

    Dok J Loaded Pockets

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    Well yeah, emergency professionals can diagnose and treat a tension pneumo with a stethoscope and a needle, battle medics too.
    I'm just a nurse and I can do it... :rolleyes:
    But for a civy, in an urban-suburban enviroment, with EMS at 20 minute call-arrival... I wouldn't let them puncture me.
    Any other situation... Well, dead is dead and a (slight if untrained) chance is better...
     
  10. B_H_

    B_H_ Loaded Pockets

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    tourniquetS, 2in (wide) tape, gauze, shears, small bandaids, some antispetic.
     
  11. B_H_

    B_H_ Loaded Pockets

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    that actually scares me most -having a tension neumothorax and someone doing it wrong or not doing it at all. its bad all around in my opinion... :cry:
     
  12. Artifice

    Artifice Loaded Pockets

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    Antiseptic, Band Aids, Guaze or Quik Clot,Various Meds, Tape and ProtecX Poison Ivy Wipes if you out in the woods.
     
  13. Chuck Norris Light

    Chuck Norris Light Loaded Pockets

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    I've never heard the ’snake oil' expression before. Funny. :)
    Thanks for it.
     
    Last edited by Chuck Norris Light, Jun 13, 2012
  14. Urban Hermit

    Urban Hermit EDC Junkie!!!

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    I carry Acetaminophen for myself because of a heart condition (not supposed to take NSAID's). But also carry Alieve for others. I carry Zyrtec, Antacids, triple antibiotic, burn gel, Anti itch pen, quick clot, Gauze bandages, medical tape and shears.
    But 3 very important things that I use often and have to keep replacing are Benadryl, Imodium and Veterinary Balm (also known as Riley's Salve.)
    I've used the Veterinary Balm on my own scrapes and rashes as much as on my dogs, and it works. And as per my Vet's suggestions, I have to sometimes use Benadryl and Imodium for my dogs. Benadryl helps when they get summer hot spots and rashes and might otherwise scratch themselves bloody. And a child's dose of Imodium helps when they get a little diarrhea.
    I actually started carrying the Imodium after watching many episodes of Survivorman and Dual Survival. Les, Dave and Cody are often talking about how a bout of diarrhea in a survival situation can dehydrate you and prove very dangerous, so it just makes sense to carry a few in my FAK.
     
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  15. SAKplumber
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    SAKplumber EDC Junkie!!!!!

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  16. Senserazer

    Senserazer Loaded Pockets

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    I have no experience with quick clot, 25g, how much is that? Sufficient for a "regular" stab wound or?
    And the thing I like about it is that I will only have to add a sheet of plastic and my heart/lung rescue mask, maybe a pair of scissors as well. What do you all think?
     
  17. sungame

    sungame Loaded Pockets

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    Looks good to me. However, as a former Norwegian boy scout, I am a big fan of what we call enkeltmannspakker, which are pretty similar to Israeli dressings and other battle dressings. Even with all the other bandaging material you've got there, I would still add one, as they are very quick and easy to apply, takes up relatively little space and can be used to treat a large variety of wounds and injuries.
     
  18. SAKplumber
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    SAKplumber EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Having never used it I just don't know:/
     
  19. Senserazer

    Senserazer Loaded Pockets

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    @ SAK and let's hope none of us ever will!

    @ Sungame, I live in Denmark, so do you maybe have a link to a norwegian site where I can buy those?