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How to use the rotating bezel

Discussion in 'Watches' started by doggone, Feb 2, 2008.

  1. doggone

    doggone Empty Pockets

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    Can someone explain how the rotating bezel on dive watches are supposed to be used?

    Which direction do the bezels rotate? If it's a timing feature shouldn't the bezels be numbered backwards?
     
  2. karlito

    karlito Loaded Pockets

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    If it's a timing feature shouldn't the bezels be numbered backwards?


    [/quote]
    I've actually wondered about that myself.

    When using mine, I just set the 0 of the bezel at the minute hand and HOPE I remember how much time I have on the parking meter.
     
  3. Crocodilo

    Crocodilo Loaded Pockets

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    Dive bezels rotate only counterclockwise, so that if they slip the time count will be larger than reality, not the other way around, to prevent the diver from staying under too longer.

    At the beggining of the dive (or whatever else you want to time) just turn the bezel to put zero in front of the minute hand. From now on you can read elapsed time on the bezel scale. Of course, this only lasts for 60 minutes, and you have to keep track of hours mentally. Pilots also make extensive use of this device, by marking take-off time. This is a very simple, fast and reliable timing method, used when a precision of plus or minus one minute is enough. I tend to have this kind of bezel on most of my watches, and use it several times a day.
     
  4. NoName

    NoName Loaded Pockets

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    Oh, for counting down, I usually just set it such that there're X minutes to go before the minute-hand gets to the 0 (where X is the amount of time I have to spare, of course).
     
  5. karlito

    karlito Loaded Pockets

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    DOH! :doh: Why couldn't I have thought of that???
     
  6. maxray

    maxray Loaded Pockets

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    I have used mine almost daily for many years - more than I ever thought I would. Great for any kind of timing activity - i.e. I better check this pizza in the oven in 10 minutes, etc. etc.
     
  7. Sharpy_swe

    Sharpy_swe Loaded Pockets

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    I use it every day, it's a great and simple to use feature.

    For example when I took my 1h lunch break today, I just ''reset'' the bezel and I then know exactly when to get back to work.
     
  8. e206

    e206 Loaded Pockets

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    A rotating bezel is actually very useful. It rotates only counterclockwise, so if it is accidentally hit and turns it will indicate MORE elapsed time(if it indicates less that could be dangerous). I use it frequently on my Fossil Titanium watch.
     
  9. NoName

    NoName Loaded Pockets

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    Erm, there are actually some rotating bezels that are bi-directional (in older Submariners, for example).
     
  10. Crocodilo

    Crocodilo Loaded Pockets

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    Indeed. However, the unidirectional rotating bezel is standard issue for dive watches, for the reason above described. It also usually sports a 60-click detent to hold it still. Other bezels may even exist without detents, such as for directional scales, and circular computers.