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How to charge NiMh-batteries with hand-crank?

Discussion in 'Electronic Devices' started by Dan2, Sep 20, 2017.

  1. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

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    If i can buy nimh batteries then i sure as hell can buy alkalines there also. I won't bother with hauling cranks or chargers with me. My bug out bag already had a decent number of lithium cells.
     
  2. Dan2

    Dan2 Loaded Pockets

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    True about alkalines, but lithium batteries are often not interchangeable with alkaline and nimh batteries.
     
  3. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

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    Good primary lithium's are closer to alkalines than ni-mh's are. Secondary Li-ion cells are a whole different story, are you sure you are not mixing those up?
     
  4. EZDog

    EZDog EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Lithium primaries are interchangeable with leakers.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  5. Dan2

    Dan2 Loaded Pockets

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  6. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

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    Laptop batteries and such are li-ion, not lithium primary. Might be worth reading up on stuff before making decisions and scaring yourself.

    Energizer ultimate is what you want. AA and AAA sized 1.5 volt batteries with 20+ year shelf life. You do not want 14500/18650 and the likes li-ion cells, they max out at 4.2 volts and if like to many people you buy the cheapest ones you can find i can guarantee things will not end well, possibly even with a bang.
     
  7. EZDog

    EZDog EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Not only that but the real difference is that Primary Batteries are disposable and thus Alkaline and L91 Energizers are not Rechargeable.

    The Lithium that are catching on fire are all Rechargeable models and the ones in Laptops are simply 18650 cells as are used in Flashlights and Power Tools all the time but like said above are twice the Voltage or more and need to be recharged carefully.
    Each has a place in my emergency gear but you really should know the differences and understand the limitations and liabilities of each to make the best decisions about them.
     
  8. SOS24

    SOS24 Loaded Pockets

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    Even though a small solar panel requires light and time, I would go for that over a hand crank for emergencies. I have used hand cranked radios and lanterns, and it may not seem like a lot but the effort required to yield results can add up.
     
  9. dml24

    dml24 Loaded Pockets

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    Dan2 is correct. Many people, think older, small men/women cannot carry heavy loads. Everyone who has an EDC/GHB makes compromises based upon needs and ability. I can easily carry 45lbs. So that gives me a few options. Keep mind that everyone is different.
     
  10. Dan2

    Dan2 Loaded Pockets

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    Some people who are old or disabled, can carry just one pound.
     
    #30 Dan2, Oct 4, 2017
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2017
  11. Dan2

    Dan2 Loaded Pockets

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    https://www.teamknowhow.com/discover/discover/why-do-smartphone-batteries-explode
     
  12. EZDog

    EZDog EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    And can you picture those people more easily carrying a few Lithium Primary Batteries or Cranking the charger long enough to give usable output?
     
  13. Dan2

    Dan2 Loaded Pockets

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    Those people can use the fm radio and flashlight, that are built in there smartphone or old school mobile phone. And they obviously need help and care in case of a disaster.
     
  14. EZDog

    EZDog EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    For some reason you seem determined to not understand or admit the differences between the different battery types available and your comments clearly reflect your ignoring the experienced replies we are trying to give here?
    Cell Phone batteries are in the same group of rechargeable batteries as computer and 3.7v flashlight batteries that are known to explode or catch fire and are not the same batteries that we are talking about here really for the hand crank charging.

    The NiMh batteries like Eneloops are not this type of battery and neither are the L91 Lithium Primary batteries.
    Neither are Lithium Rechargeable Batteries.

    If I had ever found a decent hand crank battery charger I would be the first to endorse it and would have a few of them myself but so far the only crank type chargers that I have been able to try are cheap and ineffective in general and poor excuses for preparedness and should really not be advertised for this use.
    I have a few radios and lights with charging cranks and each feels like it will not actually even survive the cranking long enough to be useful and much less become a valued part of my emergency gear.

    On the other hand Lithium primary AA batteries for example are so light weight and reliable that I don't think I have ever heard stories about the downsides of them other than initial price?

    I carry several and rely on the to be there when needed with no issues or further planning required and very little burden to carry as they are so light too.
     
  15. Narcosynthesis

    Narcosynthesis Loaded Pockets

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    There seems to be some confusion here about battery types...

    Single use lithium cells like the Energiser AA and AAA batteries, CR123's and others are very stable and long lasting - so there is essentially no risk of explosion or leakage, and as they typically have a shelf life far longer than alkaline single use batteries and rechargeables, are a great option for storage/backup use - obviously you will need to make sure you have appropriate batteries for your devices, but keeping a 4 pack of AA lithium single use batteries is a good option for emergency power for AA devices.
    In AA format you also get more traditional options like alkaline, and rechargeables like nimh batteries that again are also safe and reliable.

    The batteries that come with the warning are the rechargeable lithium cells typically found in things like mobile phones, laptops and high power gadgets - these are a completely different chemistry from a single use cell, and are the ones you will see horror videos about swelling up and/or catching fire. Generally they are specific to these devices and so are not much use outside of their specific gadgets.

    In terms of keeping yourself supplied with power on the move, I have yet to see any hand cranked options that are really worth considering - generally they seem to be slow and inefficient, and take a surprising amount of effort to get any meaningful charge from.
    Instead I would definitely look to options like solar panels - a couple of small panels and charging unit/battery can be pretty practical to use, and will easily give you the power to recharge things like USB devices or recharge things like AA Eneloops, camera batteries and the like. There are many options out there for camping, hiking and suchlike that would be well worth looking into.

    What makes most sense to you is hugely dependant on your situation and needs - a fit, younger person that is looking to be entirely self sufficient for long periods in an emergency is a completely different case from an older person just wanting some handy supplies or that is making a get home bag to carry in a car that is only aimed for emergency use and not carrying more than 24 hours supplies... So it is worth considering the exact situation you are aiming to prepare for, and then looking to find the best option.