1. Are you a current member with account or password issues?

    Please visit following page for more information

    Dismiss Notice

Home/Outdoor Defense Gun

Discussion in 'Handguns' started by WildEMT, Aug 31, 2008.

  1. indabayou

    indabayou Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2009
    Messages:
    326
    Likes Received:
    0
    Okay, I was told at one time to use a shot gun in the house for an intruder,because of very little chance of missing said target and by chance if you did you would not send bullets flying threw several walls of your house and the way my house is built if i miss with a handgun in the hallway i would for sure fill my cars full of bullet holes in the garage.lol Just my opinion,and i quite aware that there are some who would disagree.
     
  2. SnWnMe

    SnWnMe Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2008
    Messages:
    478
    Likes Received:
    2
    Unless you are within punching distance of your target, you can still miss with a shotgun. And those pellets will efficiently chew up anything that happens to stop them. If you live in a typical SoCal drywall McHouse like I do, you will also get a bit of through and through penetration. But back on topic:

    Lots of good info here. Big animals = big revolver. If you do consider a Mtn gun in 44 Mag... Make you sure you try one first. They are nasty with the typical proven 240 gr 1500 fps loads and your second shot is just as important as your first.
     
  3. 0dBm

    0dBm Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2006
    Messages:
    5,443
    Likes Received:
    3,870
    I'm not, necessarily, disagreeing with you. I just wanted you to elaborate on WHY you feel that those two particular Remington products would provide "less collateral damage to your home" since you did not specify the ammunition that will be used in conjunction with them.

    If one were to use it as a club in lieu of discharging a handgun, what would be hit around a typical homestead with lamps, porcelain, glass, etc? If it were loaded with a one-ounce lead slug, the projectile would MOST certainly create a larger hole than any handgun bullet. If it were loaded with 00 Buckshot, depending on the distance the target is from the firearm muzzle, the pellets AND pattern create destructive, often devastating cavities on many common household items. Were it loaded with #5 or #7 Birdshot, the pellets would be smaller, however the damage may, invariably, BE equally destructive ceteris paribus with 00 Buckshot.

    Have you actually SEEN the effects of a shotgun splatter pattern on a typical residential room?
     
  4. parawolfe

    parawolfe Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2008
    Messages:
    616
    Likes Received:
    0
    A pump shotgun is the best weapon for home defense. It isn't going to do less damage to your home, but is less likely to kill the neighbor. Especially compared to a rifle or high velocity handgun like a .357. I use #1 Buck primarily, but have also been using the reduced recoil 00 Buck shells. I really like the reduced recoil shells. I, fortunately, do not have neighbors that live within 50 yards in any direction. But I still use a pump shotgun.

    Parawolfe
     
  5. indabayou

    indabayou Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2009
    Messages:
    326
    Likes Received:
    0
    10-4 OdBM I should have been more clear about what i was saying,I have a rem870 and 1187,sorry i was not trying to imply that is the best to use. I load mine with 4shot. Oh i'm sure a shotgun makes and creates massive damage to drywall,i'd rather replace sheetrock than having to fix my cars riddled with bullet holes.
     
  6. 0dBm

    0dBm Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2006
    Messages:
    5,443
    Likes Received:
    3,870
    NOT necessarily. It depends on the location, type of home, and the circumstances. Don't discount the fact that there are homes in other countries that are built differently from the gypsum drywall and wood dwellings that we as Americans have now become accustomed to.

    Friends of ours have rather well-to-do family preferring to reside part of the year south of the border. In that country, there have been wave of abductions of family members held eventually for ransom.

    This family apparently live in a compound where the home itself is barricaded within a stone, concrete, and stucco composite wall reaching as high as 12 feet depending on the location.

    The preferred home defense weapon is a short assault rifle loaded with lead soft point .223. The carbine length allows the sentries to carry these weapons and move about more effectively. The rifle cartridge allow for greater penetration when the bad guys try to hide and then run between the external partitions of the building; built of the same stone, concrete, and stucco composite. With the exception of the solid lead slugs which do not allow for a faster rate of fire and adequate recovery times due to the massive recoil, shotgun ammunition penetrates inadequately if at all though those solid walls. The .223 apparently penetrates just enough to hit the bad guys and the high rate-of-fire provides a greater probability of hits.

    The family is grilled to hit the floor pronto when the alarm sounds as gunfire is sure to erupt.
     
  7. parawolfe

    parawolfe Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2008
    Messages:
    616
    Likes Received:
    0
    OdBm,

    I've lived in Europe and know that the walls in residential buildings are very solid there too. But, I doubt most people live in a compound, barricaded from Cartels. That scenario brings a different meaning to home defense. If I lived in a compound I would have security with weapons that were legal to use in that area.

    The beauty of a pump shotgun is it's simplicity of use and the ability to fire so many different types of ammo. You can get the type of ammo you think you need depending on your situation. I also own an AK-74, not 47, and a CAR-15, basically the AR version of the M4. Both are the last weapons I would want to defend my home with. In the US once an intruder leaves the residence you can't continue to give chase or shoot at them. Just while they are in your home. So I don't want a high velocity weapon regardless what ammo it being fired. If I were living in the Alamo, then that is a different story.

    Parawolfe
     
  8. 0dBm

    0dBm Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2006
    Messages:
    5,443
    Likes Received:
    3,870
    As I stated in my previous, I'll underscore it in this one, it depends on the location, type of home, and the circumstances. I'll add that no one weapon is "best."

    You have echoed that sentiment in your last post.
     
  9. seeker_two

    seeker_two Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you haven't bought a handgun already (looking at the date, you probably have), I'd recommend either the 4" Ruger Redhawk or the 2.5" Super Redhawk Alaskan in .44 Magnum. Easy to carry, and plenty of good ammo for home defense (.44SPL) to bear defense (.44MAG hardcast) is available.

    You could also look at some of the lightweight .44MAG revolvers from S&W or Taurus, but those can be hard to shoot w/ magnum loads.