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Hand Drill / Push Drill

Discussion in 'Do-It-Yourself & Gear Modifications' started by Rainy, Sep 15, 2013.

  1. Rainy
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    Rainy Uber Prepared

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    • Hot-linked image removed per Rule 3b!
    I like doing the occasional DIY mods and projects, but finding the right tools for each job is not always easy. Right now im looking for a manual hand drill. For small and simple projects id rather not whip out my large electric drill, so i figured id find something manual. I remember my grandfather had one way back in the day, but im hard pressed to find one like it today.

    Now, with all the modders and handy people around here im sure someone knows where to find this. To visualize what im looking for, ill add these pictures:

    http://www.garrettwade.com/images/330/89B0401.jpg

    or something like this:

    [​IMG]


    Needless to say, i need this to be a quality tool, but without a sky high pricetag. It also needs to be compatible with todays screws, drills and whatnot. Ive seen some items marketed as "vintage" etc on ebay/amazon, but im unsure of the quality of these. Any takers? :D
     
  2. indigo_wolf

    indigo_wolf AKA Breezy

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  3. Rainy
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    Rainy Uber Prepared

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    Have you tried any of their tools yourself?
     
  4. indigo_wolf

    indigo_wolf AKA Breezy

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    Not the manuals drills, but I have bought other items from GW that I have been happy with.

    If you can narrow your locale down to a country rather than continent, it might help people with suggestions.

    ATB,
    Sam
     
  5. kertap75

    kertap75 EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    I used to have a manuel drill for making models. It was more of a bit holder with a rotating butt so you could put pressure on and still be able to turn the bit. This might not work for you but any hobby modeling shop would have something similar
     
  6. yaniv glozman

    yaniv glozman Loaded Pockets

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    Working with them as a kid the one in the drawing is more of screw driver . For driling you better use the eggbitter type on the link or this type
    [​IMG]


    The best place to buy them in my opinion is the fleamarket.
     
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  7. Rockwell Torrey

    Rockwell Torrey Loaded Pockets

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    Ok, now I want one. Off to Sears to test drive a few,


    Strange thought of the week: Politicians and diapers have one thing in common. They should both be changed regularly, and for the same reason.

     
  8. Nick4305
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    Nick4305 EDC Junkie!!!!!

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  9. shmook

    shmook Loaded Pockets

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    The pic in the OP is also known as a Yankee screwdriver, if that helps :)
     
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  10. Sriracha

    Sriracha Loaded Pockets

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    I was issued a few as a telephone tech. Like Shmook said above, we called them yankee drills. If I find one, Ill grab it for you, sometimes you find old stuff in the back of decommissioned trucks and the like.
     
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  11. Sriracha

    Sriracha Loaded Pockets

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    Also if you want to go even smaller.... Check out jewelers drills. very cool.
     
  12. Exploriment

    Exploriment Loaded Pockets

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    The always terrific LowTech Magazine has an article on handpowered drills.
    http://www.lowtechmagazine.com/2010/12/hand-powered-drilling-tools-and-machines.html

    And the equally always terrific Lee Valley carries an assortment of hand drills.
    Braces, like the one yaniv glozman shows:
    http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=32300&cat=1,180,42337

    Jewellers drill:
    http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=32297&cat=1,180,42337

    An egg beater style hand drill. I have this one and use for kayak and canoe building, and like it a whole lot:
    http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=32294&cat=1,180,42337
     
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  13. shmook

    shmook Loaded Pockets

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    Yankee drivers were popular over here, but the reason they died out (at least the rumour I heard) was that they were dangerous on building sites. They are locked closed, and spring out when released, which can cause nasty puncture wounds...

    I'm guessing the rise of battery drills/drivers also contributed though :)

    I remember my dads when I was a child. You felt like some sort of ninja when you ran around and shot it out, it was cool! I always had to do it without him knowing though, due to the danger mentioned above :p I was lucky really!
     
  14. Swatsonia

    Swatsonia Loaded Pockets

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    Between my dad and myself, we have an electric drill, a wired hammer drill, and his dad's old manual drill. I've found myself to be using the manual drill more and more often for drilling wood, micarta etc recently. Egg beater style is definitely recommended.
     
  15. Rainy
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    Rainy Uber Prepared

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    Thanks for the helpfull tips! Still not sure what to get, the egg beater style hand drill does look a bit more sturdy than the yankee screwdrivers though so i might end up with that...
     
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  16. Blackheart

    Blackheart Loaded Pockets

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    The push drills were/are great for drilling holes for wood screws, no electricity required. I still use mine regularly. The "Yankee" screwdrivers were "meh". With slotted screw heads, they were hard to keep in the slot while pushing on the driver with the head spinning. Worked best with phillips head screws. I'm not surprised they fell by the wayside when something better came along. Still got one in the toolbox, mostly for sentimental reasons, though.
     
  17. nick nitro

    nick nitro Loaded Pockets

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    When I worked as a marine carpenter as an apprentice we used Yankee drivers because of the expensive and exotic woods we used. Power drivers were verboten because of the potential for runaway damage. As a young apprentice when I had purchased my first Yankee driver, the master shipwrights first instruction on the tool was to remove the spring to prevent an "accident" with very expensive wood. Still have all my tools stored away, and all the drivers are sans springs.
     
  18. shmook

    shmook Loaded Pockets

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    ^thanks, I didn't know that :)
     
  19. patrat

    patrat Loaded Pockets

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    I have the Schroeder Hand Drill (the 1/4in, I think). It is a good tool. The fiskars seemed to have mixed reviews for durability so I stayed away. It can drill holes closer to an obstruction (such as a wall, ceiling, countertop) than you can get with an electric drill. It is very quiet, I expect this will be my go-to tool for after hours holemaking jobs around the house, once I have kids. The hand crank speed is such that you have alot of time to catch and correct a mistake, relative to a power drill, but it is still efficient with a sharp bit. The ability to work with low clearance really helped when I was installing cabinet catch hardware, to keep the dog out of the pantry.