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Gun Lube

Discussion in 'Handguns' started by RAMBOCAT, Mar 11, 2016.

  1. DCBman

    DCBman Loaded Pockets

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    Another thought on the subject of lubrication...

    There's a school of thought which suggests it's actually better to clean a firearm before using it, rather than after. Even sitting in a safe, a firearm will collect dust and debris regardless of what you put on it. The logic goes, taking a firearm out of the safe to the range and firing it without first cleaning it works all that grime, lint and crap into the inner-most recesses and workings of the action. Cleaning and lubricating the firearm prior to use avoids this problem, plus it removes any fouling out of the barrel which will marginally improve accuracy.

    Yes, it's a hassle; when you want to go shooting, you want to grab your gear and GO. You don't want to sit there for an hour and clean every firearm you want to shoot before hand. Consequently, I am guilty of not always doing this except on certain firearms. If I'm going to go shoot an AK, for example, I usually just throw it down in a mud puddle to rinse it off and then grab a handful of sand and rub it down to dry it off and tighten everything back up. If I'm going to shoot one of the match pistols or rifles at distance, they get thoroughly cleaned before use. Shooting one of the AR's, sometimes I'll field strip and clean them before use, sometimes not (but always after). After shooting one of the AK's on the other hand...just toss it back in the mud puddle again, cycle the action a few times underwater, grab an old rag in the garage and dip it in a pan of used motor oil, wipe it down and throw (not toss, but "throw") it in the bed of the truck and carry on (use and repeat).
     
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  2. Caleb

    Caleb Loaded Pockets

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    Remoil for me. My rifles don't get shot as much as a lot of AR's, AK's etc. They do a lot of hunting though. They might get shot 2 or 3 time a trip, but I usually clean them before I put them back up because they are a lot more dirty than when I pulled them out. For the exterior of my rifles, etc I use Obenauf's leather oil, lightly. I finished a stock that I had stripped with it and it turned out awesome, so I've been going crazy with the Obenauf's lately. I do make sure the rifles are fairly dry before I take them out.
     
  3. Ssouth

    Ssouth Loaded Pockets

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    Been using mobil1 5w20 for the past several years with no problems on my gamer guns which get used, abused and are seldomly cleaned. I also add a little squirt of clp into the action of the ar's and a thin coat of slide glide to the rails of my pistols.
     
  4. Glock Doc

    Glock Doc Loaded Pockets

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    We've been using the Lubriplate products for a few years now, and I am never going back, they are superior.

    Have a cabinet full of gun oils and greases, sad to think how much dough I wasted! Ugh!
     
  5. Durandal64

    Durandal64 Loaded Pockets

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    I used FireClean last year for the first time at a Costa Ludus Premier Handgun Class. 3 days and a bit over 2k rounds rolling around in the dirt and dust, racking the guns off everything. No jams, FTF/FTE and no cleaning after we got done each day. My pistol pretty much wiped down after I got home. I'll keep using it until something else provides a better easier solution which is hard to imagine in my current experience.
     
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  6. RogerStenning

    RogerStenning EDC Junkie

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    I served in the Territorial Army - now called the reserves - here in the UK; I was also an Armoury Storesman for the unit, and later a qualified Range Control Officer and Shooting Coach. The regulations we had back then said to only use gun oil - OX18, which was a mineral oil with the usual semi-synthetic additives for low and high temperature use in temperate environments; after using your weapon, you'd clean it thoroughly, including all metal-bearing surfaces, gas parts, et all, before storing it in the unit armoury. On drawing the weapon the next time, you'd perform what was called "Normal daily cleaning" - basically a quick relube of the metal-bearing surfaces, and wiping down on oil-free areas, plus a quick pull-through of the barrel and chamber. As DCBMan said, better to clean it beforehand, so as to make it easier to clean it later; plus, it makes sure that all the required parts are oiled or dried before use, and all dust and other unwanted muck is removed before you park it pointing downrange and feed it the bang bits ;) The regs also made it quite clear that the Army didn't hold with synthetic cleaning agents such as CLP and the like. Annoying for some, but given the methods the army used worked well, not that surprising :)

    I used the same methodology on my target rifle back then - I was also a civilian shooter - which was a Walther KKM UIT .22"LR; lovely rifle, and using oil only, never hurt it one bit. I was sorry to give it up, but that's another story ;)
     
  7. jdindadell

    jdindadell Loaded Pockets

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    I feel that the amount of foreign debris that can enter my handgun when stored inside the safe to be equal or less than the amount that will likely invade the action in the short interval between the unboxing and firing at the range, so see no need to reclean a properly stored clean weapon.
    Also atf was designed to function in a much harsher and more demanding environment than a firearm will ever encounter. I do see the merits of dry film lube for a carry gun as it will be subject to the environment continuously. However dust and fluff do not pose any significant issue to most firearm actions, the tolerances are just to big. If you have a gun that will cease to function when dust is introduced you might want to examine other options.
     
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  8. trfkcop

    trfkcop Loaded Pockets

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    Shell Rotella T. Diesel oils are designed for carbon etc. AR bolts almost wipe clean after a day at the range. $.02
     
  9. Buckeye Jake

    Buckeye Jake Loaded Pockets

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    Lps 1 or mineral oil .

    Jake
     
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  10. RogerStenning

    RogerStenning EDC Junkie

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    True, but it's still a good habit to get into, especially if you go, for example, hunting, as many Americans do, of course.
     
  11. Telstar

    Telstar Loaded Pockets

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    I do not consider ATF as practical or needed. Generally speaking, I think the conditions where ATF performs well or is needed is not likely to be achieved with a firearm. If this is a money saving endeavor I would ask what effect does "time" have one a motor oil or a transmission fluid that sits on a shelf for years. Does it degrade? does it become acidic? will the add-pack chemicals react with gun cleaning solvents? To me its just not worth a couple of bucks to try and Frankenstein a gun lube when there are dozens of scientifically formulated gun lubes already out there. Its not like they are expensive.

    I purchase a bottle of MPro-7 lube every couple of years.. its not likely to break the bank or anything.
     
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  12. cityofthesouth

    cityofthesouth Loaded Pockets

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    Whether I agree with the suggestion or not, my car's manual specifically states that the transmission fluid never needs changed. So regardless of whether it breaks down or not from sitting on a shelf, it seems to do ok sitting in a transmission for decades. Plus, unless you are having transmission issues, that one quart we all keep in the garage for 50 years is usually fine when we do finally crack it open.

    Gun oils are more likely than not a diluted and familiar type of oil, and scientifically formulated to separate gun owners from their money. Ounce for ounce they are very expensive and those individual ounces have less value on top of their cost. If science is in question then the millions or billions of hours of automotive racing and testing far and away (like light years) exceed any science behind gun oil.

    So really it's not about pinching pennies. It's more about not wasting money on products which either offer almost nothing for their cost, or are specifically designed to cost more than they should. I'd rather be buying ammo.

    There is an "open" range near me where I shoot - you have to bring everything you need and you are free to do as you please - and I see this a lot. The guy has bought his gun and 50 rounds of ammo and is ready to shoot. No one told the poor bastard he had to also buy this special lube and other cleaning supplies, bags, pricey hearing protection, memberships to this organization and that organization, targets, target stands, holsters, mag carriers, slings, belts, safes, and only the most expensive tacticool brands will suffice .... and the list goes on and on. In fact, it never seems to end. At least with motor oil you can scratch a little something off the list that costs more than it needs to, and be using a superior product in the process.
     
  13. grayman

    grayman Loaded Pockets

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    If the cabinet over my work bench is any indication, I've tried dozens of lubricants over the years for my firearms. Everything from mineral oil to stuff made for desert warfare; oils and greases too. It wasn't until I had my first 1911 built for competition shooting (IDPS/USPSA). My gunsmith, who was also a good friend and shooting partner, built me a fine high-capacity .38 super. When he gave me the pistol he also gave me a small bottle of oil and told me to use it liberally. He also made me shoot the gun "in the white" for three months in case something had to be changed. For those that don't know, that means the gun is an unfinished carbon steel. I put several thousands of rounds through the gun in that time. I never rusted and ran flawlessly. When I ran out of oil I asked him where to get more. He told me to go to Autozone and pick up a quart of Quaker State SAE 30. After looking at him for what seemed like 20 minutes. I just said, "OK" and went a bought a quart. The only problem I ever had was finding a decent oiler bottle that would eventually bleed through or deteriorate.

    I had loaned people oil like it was going out of style at the range. Everyone that ever asked where to get looked at me much the way I'm sure I looked at my buddy when he told me. I've had a few people who new more than everyone one else try and tell me it had things in it an engine needed by not a gun. The fact is the proof is in the pudding as they say. So if you want to run ATF, then do it. If it meets your needs great, if not, try the next thing.
     
  14. whoppo

    whoppo Loaded Pockets

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    SLIP2000 EWL and EWG on everything. Stored well, runs just a great at 15 below zero as it does at 100 degrees.


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  15. chanroc

    chanroc Loaded Pockets

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    For years, I've used either Hoppes Gun Oil or Break Free CLP on all my firearms and never had any problems with either. I just recently tried Lucas Gun Oil on my pistols, and I really like it.
    For long term storage in the safe, e.g. certain hunting rifles, I run a patch of Rig Gun Grease down the barrel and a light coat outside. I'll run a patch of Hoppes #9 back down the barrel right before I go hunting or the range.
    But back to lubes for pistols, my biggest thing is that I want to make sure whatever I use, is safe on all materials/finish. If I lived in extreme cold weather (like Alaska), I might rethink what I used. Where I'm at now (Central Ohio), my current lube is just fine for the environment here.

    Sent from my KFTHWI using Tapatalk
     
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  16. E.D.C

    E.D.C Loaded Pockets

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    I use hopes no complaints what so ever
     
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