1. Are you a current member with account or password issues?

    Please visit following page for more information

    Dismiss Notice

Good budget kitchen knives?

Discussion in 'Knives' started by C.Boland93, Dec 20, 2013.

  1. netcat

    netcat Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2013
    Messages:
    658
    Likes Received:
    754
    Easy to experience. Troy to find a Japanese cook with a non-chisel ground knife or try to find a chisel ground knife in a classical French kitchen. :p

    Actually, this terminology is what the better kitchen equipment dealers in Germany use. ;)



    --
    Urban EDC philosophy: Getting things done for yourself and others.

    "Inveniam viam aut faciam!" - I will find a way or make one!
     
  2. RichinVA

    RichinVA Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Messages:
    1,292
    Likes Received:
    7,281
    That explains a lot........



    <<< Even when the world is at peace, a gentleman always keeps a blade at his side.
    -The Strategies of Wu. >>>
     
  3. Adahn

    Adahn Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2013
    Messages:
    4,369
    Likes Received:
    14,490
    Hmm, I think you guys talk past each other. A traditional Japanese kitchen knife has a grind like a kiridashi, one side is flat, the other side ground. There is no second bevel as you can grind such non-rust-resistant steals down to a total of 10 degrees (most stainless steels can't hold an edge at such steep angles). You must use a grind where the use looks on the flat side (so there's right and left handed versions). This way allows you to get a very exact cut in a 90 degrees angle (if you have the experience, of course).

    European knives very usually ground from both sides, and then often with a second bevel with the never stainless steels.
    This grind is easier to sharpen, but doesn't allow the same precision which is also not needed as the dishes are different.

    I hope that helped a bit and that I didn't talk too much rubbish from misunderstanding :p

    But here it's maybe explained in a better language:

    >>>>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_knife

    Unlike western knives, Japanese knives are often single ground, i.e., sharpened so that only one side holds the cutting edge. As shown in the image, some Japanese knives are angled from both sides, and others are angled only from one side, with the other side of the blade being flat. It was originally believed that a blade angled only on one side cuts better and makes cleaner cuts, though requiring more skill in its use than a blade with a double-beveled edge. Usually, the right hand side of the blade is angled, as most people use the knife with their right hand, with ratios ranging from 70–30 for the average chef's knife, to 90–10 for professional sushi chef knives; left-handed models are rare and must be specially ordered and custom made.[2]

    [​IMG]
    (b) is angled on both sides, (a) and (c) only on one side, where (a) is for right-handed use and (c) is for left-handed use. <<<<

    Still don't understand why they say " It was originally believed..." but then don't make comments how much that's "true" or not.
    I can only say that for cutting leather or such on a surface a single grind gives more controll and a better cut then when both sides are ground.
     
    netcat likes this.
  4. usmchawk

    usmchawk Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2012
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    89
    I've had the Old Hickory (good general purpose knife), Wustenof (very good) and I've recently bought a Seto damascus and it is by far the best kitchen knife I've ever used. I purchased a Seto 120mm Petty Knife, it takes a scary sharp edge, holds it well, and resharpening is easy. I'm getting ready to purchase their Santoku Chef Knife, although on the pricey side (~$100-$125). I too like the carbon steel and I make my own out of D2, but I'm nowhere close to producing the quality of these Seto knives.
     
  5. RichinVA

    RichinVA Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Messages:
    1,292
    Likes Received:
    7,281
    Totally different animals.....a deba or a yanagiba are ground like your wiki pic, but gyutos are not. Debas are primarily used for fish or poultry breakdown, while yanagibas are usually for sushi chefs, altho' they also make decent slicers. The vast majority of Japanese knives are double beveled, altho' one side can be almost 0°. Let's not confuse sharpening angle with grind angle.........

    But this really has nothing to do with the OP's question. I'd rather have one Tojiro, which again, I consider a starter knife, than 50 Forschners, Wüstofs or Henckels. Those are very soft steels. Just my $.02..........



    <<< Even when the world is at peace, a gentleman always keeps a blade at his side.
    -The Strategies of Wu. >>>
     
  6. Elduka

    Elduka Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2013
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    29
    The Victorinox ones are very good for a budget
     
  7. blazinworm

    blazinworm Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2013
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    241
    i recently bought my mom a pair of opinel carbon steel paring knives with walnut handles for $17. blades came crazy sharp and she hasn't sharpened em yet as far as i know. I've used them a few times and was very impressed. with such a thin blade everything feels like you're slicing through butter. being carbon steel you have to clean and oil em a little more than SS but i prefer the edge they take for a paring knife.

    i agree with others that 90% of the work you'll do in the kitchen can be achieved with a paring knife and a bigger ~7"-8" knife. other than that the only other knife i use in the kitchen is a full serrated blade around 7" for cutting bread.
     
  8. parallax

    parallax Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2010
    Messages:
    611
    Likes Received:
    2,586
    I spent my money on a decent full tang Henckels chef knife and I probably use it for about 80% of the food prep. Blade doesn't stain and holds a great edge.
     
  9. C.Boland93
    • In Omnia Paratus

    C.Boland93 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,131
    Likes Received:
    12,831
    Awesome, thanks a lot for all your replies and info, I'm learning!

    Good point about not needing a whole knife block, I think what I'll do is spend it on two solid knives, maybe three if I get a bread knife. Haven't decided what yet but I'm going to get my parents some new ones too (then I can pretend they're a present for them, when really it's new toy for me haha)


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  10. Synaptic Misfire
    • In Omnia Paratus

    Synaptic Misfire Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2008
    Messages:
    1,228
    Likes Received:
    246
    I do most of my prep work with my big chef knife, but I buy a lot of meat in primal form and break it down my self so having a good slicer and boning knife helps too. I have fairly inexpensive knives, Wolfgang Puck brand but basically copies of the Henckel classic series cost me $40 with the block at TJ Maxx. Figured for that price they were worth a gamble. I treat them to a belt sharpen once a year-ish and constant steeling, the steel is a tad soft but with reasonable maintenance they are scary sharp.

    I made one mistake though, I recently bought a thank you gift for a friend in the form of a Tojiro Damascus 8" chef knife. Good lord what a fine piece of steel, gorgeous finish and an amazing balance, now I am wanting a full set and they are not even in the zip code of inexpensive!
     
  11. Varmitslayer

    Varmitslayer Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2013
    Messages:
    615
    Likes Received:
    758
    Old Hickory and victorinox are both very good.
    The Paula Dean knives are also pretty good if you can still find some.(also the paula dean cookware is great for a budget, if you can still find it.)
     
    warchild likes this.
  12. Foster
    • In Omnia Paratus

    Foster Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2013
    Messages:
    380
    Likes Received:
    348
    If you wait until Boxing Day you can probably score a nice set of Henkels on sale for half (or more) off. I got a set of the midrange priced Henkels, normally around $150-200 for about $60 last year. They usually come with a block as well, depending on the set.

    I also suggest you get a universal knife block (google Bodum or Kapoosh for some good models) so you can add in single blades you get. That allows you to mix and match your set with more expensive knives you might not want to buy all at once as part of a set, or knives you might get as gifts if Santa is good to you.
     
  13. Derek Bergstrom

    Derek Bergstrom Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2013
    Messages:
    172
    Likes Received:
    270
    lol so i got a knife from the dollar store. its a large santoku. i cannot get it to fail. funny that a hammer and some wood and throwing and chopping havnt damaged the blade at all.
     
    netcat likes this.
  14. C.Boland93
    • In Omnia Paratus

    C.Boland93 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,131
    Likes Received:
    12,831
    Now that all the New Year festivities are over with, I'll be ordering a couple of the knives you lot kindly recommended!

    Just as soon as I recover enough to move to the laptop…


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    AK Adventurer likes this.
  15. calebklyne

    calebklyne Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2011
    Messages:
    218
    Likes Received:
    120
    I second the Esee Becker set! They are excellent quality for the price and they have literally the best warranty out there

    Sent from my SGH-I317M using Tapatalk