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Going on a camping trip in about a month. What to bring?

Discussion in 'Travel' started by ?uesto, Nov 23, 2010.

  1. ?uesto

    ?uesto Loaded Pockets

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    I'm going camping in about 4 weeks with some friends, and I'm not much of an outdoorsman, but I'm definitely the most well prepared amongst allthat are going. What would you recommend I bring and learn for the trip?
     
  2. DaPro

    DaPro Loaded Pockets

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    All depends in the type of camping, tent or RV.....campground with amenities (toilet, shower)........recreations

    I personally hate to go to campgrounds, but my wife love it, so I bought a small pull behind camper.
     
  3. ?uesto

    ?uesto Loaded Pockets

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    It definitely won't have the amenities. We plan on roughing it for the night. We'll have tents.
     
  4. jehan60188

    jehan60188 Loaded Pockets

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    a mattress pad. i don't care what kind of camping you're going to be doing, a mattress pad is essential! especially if it's cold (adds a layer between you and the cold ground)

    i do mostly car camping. some things I pack-

    spare underpants and clothes
    headlamp (essential)
    bug spray (not needed in the winter)
    sunscreen (needed all year round; I've got a dark complexion, but still use it to avoid skin cancer)
    fire starting materials. it's fun to play with different kinds of methods, but always pack a lighter

    also, don't leave your campsite without these: http://www.seattlepi.com/getaways/216076_essentials17.html I throw some form of them into my camelbak whenever I go for a hike. It's not hard to get lost on a hiking trail, but it is easy to overestimate yourself, and end up hiking longer than you expected.

    and a camera!

    if you're going backcountry style camping, then bring a small trowel, or an aluminum tent stake.

    edit: clean socks! change your socks out ever 6-8 hours for maximum comfort
     
  5. LivingUpNorth

    LivingUpNorth Loaded Pockets

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    First off, good for you! I think camping is something everyone should experience, at least a few times, if for no other reason than to learn to appreciate the comforts of home. I've always enjoyed it.

    Next, a few questions: How long will you be out? What will the weather be like? Do you plan on cooking (on a camp stove) or eating ready-made meals? A lot of stuff to figure out, but this will help determine what and how much you need to bring. It's pretty easy to over-pack. I still have to make a conscious effort to trim unnecessary stuff.

    For fun and learning, bring a few methods of fire starting and practice them. That way, if you ever decide to EDC a fire kit, you'll know how to use it.

    +1 on Jehan60188's suggestions.

    I would also bring something to wear in the rain, even if the weather forecast doesn't show it. Nothing's worse than being soaked to the bone all weekend.
     
  6. Mad_Maxx

    Mad_Maxx Loaded Pockets

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    a few things I have when I go camping
    not everything is listed!

    good backpack
    tent
    sleeping bag
    self inflating mattress (avoids sore back ;) )
    FAK
    fixed knife
    folding knife
    multitool
    folding saw, axe or 6"/7" blade
    flashlight+ battieries+ diffuser tip (hangs in the tent)
    work gloves (to gather wood and the like)
    fire starter + cotton tinder
    spare underwear
    spare socks
    raincoat
    fleece
    cooking pot

    maybe you can read some survival/camping manuals and practice making fire, fuzz sticks, poles, and other things

    hope this helps
    Maxx
     
  7. Geargrrl

    Geargrrl Empty Pockets

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    In addition to some of the stuff other folks have mentioned, I would throw in a lightweight hat and gloves, hot drinks for around the fire at night (chocolate, cider, tea -whatever you like), snacks for the trail, water bottles/bladders, and sunglasses. Binoculars can be handy. but not necessary. I also find having a real pillow makes car camping a lot more comfortable than trying to wad up your clothes in a stuff sack. Have a great time!
     
  8. wonderingson

    wonderingson Empty Pockets

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    here was my gear list last weekend. might not make any since but. thought id reply

    walls of jerico
    3 day trip
    55-34 degrees little rain
    pack:
    granate gear

    shelter :

    poncho tarp


    poles hikeing
    sleeping bag/ pad/ground cloth/bivy
    cloathing:
    mt harware primoloft

    capiline pants and shirt
    2 smart socks
    soloman shoes
    beenie
    patagonia pants
    hardware tights
    tarnua gloves

    food/water
    3 dinners from enertia
    3 breakfast bars
    3 raman lunch?
    snacks/ drink mix
    aqua mirra frontier pro/2 liter platapus/ 1 gatorade bottle

    tools/kit
    headlamp/ micro lamp/ batteries
    work gloves
    first aid kit
    leatherman juice
    stove and pot and fork/ fuel
    paracord
    kukri gurka
    book?
    fire startersx3 with wet fire
    izula?
    pipe?
    bandana/shamagh/buff

    hygene
    dr bronners in a nalgene ,mini
    contacts and solution and glasses
    toothbrush and paste
    deo?
     
  9. carrot

    carrot Loaded Pockets

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    Car camping or backpacking? My loadout changes significantly depending on the kind of camping.

    If I'm car camping, a few extra amenities make life convenient, such as a large tarp and folding chairs. In the warmer months I'll bring a lightweight hammock to lounge in.

    Don't forget to bring a poop shovel.
     
  10. DBR

    DBR Loaded Pockets

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    That is absolutely the most important question and until you answer that one, everything else is meaningless.
     
  11. Cobra 6 Actual

    Cobra 6 Actual Loaded Pockets

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    Here's a starter list that has some of the above items listed, plus a few more: http://www.backpacking.net/ten-essl.html Also, that website has some other lists that are built around what time of year you're going. Just as an example, if it will be cold weather I swear by those little heating packets: put one in the foot of your sleeping bag and have a good night's sleep, and so on. Have fun!
     
  12. ?uesto

    ?uesto Loaded Pockets

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    Okay, it's settled. We just made our reservations. We're getting an actual camp site through Everglades National Park, staying one night, and we'll have two cars at our campground, and two tents. We'll be sleeping in the tents, and there will be between 7 and 9 of us. We were convinced out of completely roughing it, given the group's collective lack of outdoors experience.
     
  13. jehan60188

    jehan60188 Loaded Pockets

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    you can still pseudo-rough it. you just don't have to dig cat holes!
    car camping is a lot of fun, bring lots of firewood!

    go nuts with what you bring, since weight isn't a huge concern- get a good mattress pad. you probably won't need any serious hiking boots, but make sure you have a good pair of sneakers in case you do go hiking.
    cinamon rolls, and bacon are my favorite car-camping breakfast. put the rolls near the fire, and the bacon on a stick over the fire!
    as far as food goes, bring a cooler full of your favorite winter-time treats. canned chill with beans, cheese, diced tomatoes and crackers for me. others prefer clam chowder, or burgers, or whatever.
    oh, also a FAK, just in case!
     
  14. Sharpdogs

    Sharpdogs Uber Prepared

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    TP and baby wipes. Spare no expense on a good sleeping pad. Quality headlamp (I like the Petzle Zipka) and a little keychain light like a photon or SL Nano. Bic lighter, duct tape, paracord, hand sanatizer, a bandana or two, first aid kit and all the stuff mentioned above in the other posts. I love camping, partly because I get an excuse to carry more gear. Have fun.
     
  15. JonSidneyB
    • Administrator

    JonSidneyB Uber Prepared
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    You are going to be in large tents it sounds like. This will not be so bad. When you are ready to rough it you might not even put up a tent unless the weather calls for it. Roughing it can be abandoning your car and going in at least 25 miles on foot and using just what you can carry. To others what I described is mild then to others it is extreme.

    I almost hate the word camping as it means such different things to different people. Because it varies so much you will get a very wide range of opinions on what to have. I know in Florida there are a couple of wilderness clubs. I would get with them sometime so you can see what it is like being truely in the middle of nowhere but have a hand full of experienced people around you. When roughing it one of the things usually not covered is engergy conservation while moving. Sometimes in the roughest trips the gear count actually goes down a bit rather than goes up.
     
  16. JonSidneyB
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    JonSidneyB Uber Prepared
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    Oh...on the subject of fire. Have fun but be safe.

    You will probably build a fire much larger than you need but that is ok, you are going out to have fun.

    On the Osage the Indians kind of make fun of people on their lands. They say "Red man build, little bitty fire, White man build great big fire"

    Of of the reasons they building a fire just the size as you need can be a bit of a surprise. Great big fires sometimes burn too hot and consume fuel much faster, a small fire can provide all the heat you need, you just set closer to it and put up things to reflect the heat. Too big of a fire means more time spent gathering wood.

    If the weather is good many people that are packing might go days without ever starting a fire, the will eat things as they are.
     
  17. hatchetjack

    hatchetjack EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Since you're car camping, you can pre-cook some pasta and prep some veggies etc and zip lock them. You'll be able to re-heat quickly and use the time saved for more fun stuff. don't forget the hootch.
     
  18. CDavisJK

    CDavisJK Loaded Pockets

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    Part shovel, part machete:
    [​IMG]

    The Cold Steel Soviet Special Forces Shovel.

    Mine arrives on Saturday but all of the youtube reviews sold me on it. You can use it to dig and to chop wood. It's small enough I plan on leaving it in my Jeep.
     
  19. Narcosynthesis

    Narcosynthesis Loaded Pockets

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    Some basics to consider...
    Food and drink - An appropriate selection of food and water to last you, plus all the kit you will need to prepare it, which can be anything from energy bars and ready meals that can be heated up on a stove, to pretty much normal cooking (which can easily be done on an open fire with a bit of planning) - so the food itself, bowls, mugs, whatever you feel you need to prepare it, whatever you need to cook it and whatever you need to clean up after it.

    Somewhere to sleep - so tents, sleeping bags, mats, etc... A basic roll mat of some form is definitely recommended to insulate you from the ground (I love me thermarest for this, though probably a bit expensive for one trip), and a basic foam one should be pretty cheap. Suitable sleeping bag and whatever gear you feel appropriate to wear (remembering not to wear what you have been wearing outside - it is easy to get a bit damp bumbling about outdoors and not really realise until later on when you are failing to be nice and cosy in your sleeping bag)

    Appropriate clothing - Plan for the worst and take appropriate clothing, so remember to pack some decent waterproofs if you are going to be stuck outside and suitably warm clothes to last you - I always take at least one full change for normal camping just in case. I always wear a pair of comfy hiking boots too, as I find I am on my feet a lot, and doing a lot of stomping about in muck or breaking down branches and the like and appreciate some solid, waterproof and warm footwear, though you can probably get by with trainers fairly easily.

    Lastly, something to do - do you plan on sitting round a fire relaxing, then perhaps a responsible amount of drink and a guitar. If you want to practise your woodcraft then a nice blade and appropriate tools or supplies. If you like hiking then the relevant maps and compass, etc...

    A few odds and sods that should probably be basic to most guys here would be things like torches for when it gets dark, a basic FAK, appropriate methods of emergency contact, and make sure that if you are going anywhere off the beaten track that someone at home knows where you are going and when you will be back to call in the cavalry in case of a problem.
     
  20. oldsarge

    oldsarge Loaded Pockets

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    Ground cloth under the tent, so that sticks twigs etc dont poke holes in the floor
    Reflective one sided "space blanket" tarp goes inside the tent under the mattress pad.
    shiny side up.
    sleeping pad or foam mattress
    Sleeping bag.
    if your tent is tight and well pitched this system will keep you warm down to 0 F
    The better quality the sleeping bag, the lower the temps you can handle.
    Keep your shoes and boots out of the bag.
    Wear your socks and base layer to bed. This can give an extra -10 F
    I always take a pair of crocs or slippers. If you have to get up in the middle of the night for a pee they are much easier to put on in the dark without waking everybody else.
    Buy yourself a propane "tree" it attaches to your standard 20lb propane tank and has multiple outlets. You can hook up a lantern a stove and whatever else and run them off of the one tank. Dont Need a big fire with a setup like this.
    Bring chairs, standing around or sitting on rocks and logs wears thin fast.
    Stay away from the hooch... too much booze in the cold makes you do stupid things based on stupid decisions.
    Have fun