1. Are you a current member with account or password issues?

    Please visit following page for more information

    Dismiss Notice

Forcing Patina on Opinel #6

Discussion in 'Knives' started by mktsc, Nov 5, 2009.

  1. mktsc

    mktsc Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2009
    Messages:
    58
    Likes Received:
    0
    So I just picked up an Opinel #6 and have been reading about forcing a patina with white vinegar to prevent rusting on the carbon steel blade.

    Really basic question: Will soaking the whole knife in white vinegar harm the wood in any way, or can I just toss it in the pot, and boil the whole thing?

    White vinegar seems to produce the most consistent patina, although I've heard of several methods ranging from rubbing it down with lemon juice, to leaving it sticking out of an apple for a few days. Citric acid seems to be the common denominator. Any personal experience?

    Thanks,

    -MK
     
  2. Hannibal Lecter

    Hannibal Lecter Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2006
    Messages:
    179
    Likes Received:
    24
    My Dear Friend,

    I doubt the vinegar would have a detrimental effect on the wood, but not sure I would do it. Residual vinegar in the wood could continue the etching process, as well as smell badly for a long time.

    I used a rag soaked in white vinegar, wrapped around the blade, to attain a patina on an O-1 steel custom camp knife - it only took about an hour for a dark patina to develop. Rinse thoroughly, dry and oil - then touch up the edge and prepare to cut things.

    Mustard is also often used, as you can spread it into patterns and create a faux hamon if you so choose, or 'camo stripe' your blade.

    -----------
    Hannibal
     
  3. mktsc

    mktsc Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2009
    Messages:
    58
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the advice, that's the route I'll probably take. I just want to make sure I get an even patina (no tiger stripes for me please).
     
  4. VT-aroo

    VT-aroo Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2006
    Messages:
    908
    Likes Received:
    167
    I have tried this for my carbon steel kitchen knives with some sucess. Cook some donuts, after you are done dip the blade in the 300 degree oil and then let it drip dry and cool. Then wipe it dry.

    Seems to last through washings.
     
  5. artaxerxes

    artaxerxes Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2009
    Messages:
    717
    Likes Received:
    566
    Vinegar is not good for lacquered wood.The lacquer disolves and the wood is left bare.
     
  6. crossroads

    crossroads Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    Messages:
    703
    Likes Received:
    4
    You could disassemble the Opinel; that's what I did. Remove the blade from the handle and just soak the whole thing. I put it in Coke. I don't recommend it, too many carbon dioxide bubbles put little circular patterns on my blade.
     
    Redneck Bear likes this.
  7. laurent

    laurent Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    464
    Likes Received:
    4
    I liked to cut apples with my Douk-Douk to get a strong dark oxydation on the blade. It takes some time, but i like apples.
     
  8. tlr

    tlr Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2009
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    7
    mustard and just about anything else highly acidic will help produce the reults you want.

    I used mustard and salsa to put a cool patina on a traditional boker once ;D
     
  9. dewildeman

    dewildeman Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2007
    Messages:
    1,292
    Likes Received:
    241
    Not sure how this would work on carbon steel but it works on silver. Hard boil and egg, take out the yolk, put the yolk in a zip lock bag with the knife and seal it up. The sulfur in the yolk will tarnish silver.
     
  10. liquidsunshine

    liquidsunshine Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    537
    Likes Received:
    1
    Hi,

    I guess some of the methods mentioned here can result in really nice looks. :)

    If all you're after is a long life for your Opinel, you might not need to do anything but use it though: I use the knife for whatever I happen to do (appropriate tasks for a knife of this size and class though, so no wood chopping!), including lots of kitchen work with fruit and veges. The blade becomes very stained; so does the handle; and the dishwasher adds to the "used look" appearance again. I have used them this way for years, they are among my favoured kitchen knives, and they've never failed so far.

    Finally, if they ever should break, they're cheap enough to buy a new one. If I would end up doing that every five to ten years, I guess that would be all right for a knife that I'm using several times a day all year round.

    Cheers,

    Matt
     
  11. mktsc

    mktsc Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2009
    Messages:
    58
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks a lot for all the advice guys. Last night I cleaned the blade with water and dishsoap, and soaked a paper towel in lemon juice. I proceeded to wrap the blade, and let sit for about an hour. What resulted was not exactly what I had intended, but I really like it nonetheless! I have no idea how the pattern turned out how it did, but it looks unique. :censored: did it stink when I pulled the towel off though! I washed it again, and put it in the oven at 200F to dry it quickly and thoroughly. I then oiled it using 3in1 oil.

    [img width=640 height=426]http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2750/4082954726_53db0f75cb_o.jpg[/img]

    [img width=640 height=426]http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2669/4082954872_be14ffbc5f_o.jpg[/img]

    -MK
     
  12. popedandy

    popedandy Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2007
    Messages:
    462
    Likes Received:
    143
    I got the same results you did using the same method. I wound up standing the knife on end in a glass of tomato sauce. However, it really doesn't take that long to get a natural patina if you use the knife to slice apples, onions, potatoes, etc.
     
  13. photomic

    photomic Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2006
    Messages:
    433
    Likes Received:
    4
    I think the blade took this pattern from the the paper towel "texture",
    that's one of a kind opinel now, I really like it! ;D
     
  14. liquidsunshine

    liquidsunshine Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    537
    Likes Received:
    1
    Wow, that's actually a very cool look! Now can anyone please do some comparison experiments with different textured towels or fabrics, and different acids / fruit / etc.?

    ;D

    Cheers,

    Matt
     
  15. Kenix

    Kenix Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2009
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    That turned out great haha. I'm tempted to buy half a dozen Opinels and make a collection of bizarre patinas :lolhammer:
     
  16. aguineapig

    aguineapig Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    May 10, 2009
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    I used a rag soaked in apple cider vinegar and rapped it around the blade and left it for a couple hours- worked well enough.

    I carry a #9 everyday, probably the best knife I've ever had, and thats up against some significantly more expensive knives.
     
  17. ddml

    ddml Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2009
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0
    this thread makes me wish i carried my opinel today (sorry caly!)
    my opinel blade looks like it was carried through the gates of hell on account of having been used to move around hot coals in my big green egg
    i should snap a pic...