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First Look: Tasmanian Tiger Mil OPS 80+24

Discussion in 'Gear Reviews' started by Thehunt, May 3, 2022.

  1. Thehunt

    Thehunt Loaded Pockets

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    Or: The new heavyweight champion
    End of September 2021 Tasmanian Tiger was (finally) again on roadshow to present the upcoming novelties and two then still top secret products. It was pretty clear that there were a few real firecrackers on the way.
    The Mil OPS 30 I have already presented.
    Now I can follow up with the Mil OPS 80+24.
    Short version for the lazy readers: A monster, in the truest sense of the word.
    Absolutely not for ounce-counters and ultra-light fetishists, but for those who must endure under imponderable conditions. For people with space requirements.
    That's why we're talking about 80 liters (and even those are still expandable) and twice 12 liters as "hidden asset".
    Already in use by our colleagues in the Rapid Forces Division (German army that is), we have here a heavy-duty backpack whose carrying system can easily withstand 50 kilos.
    (Disclaimer: In the pictures you see contents with a weight of honestly weighed 22 kilos). I'm more than twice as old as the guys and gals who have to hump that pack, so bear with me.
    So what does this look like?
    Like this:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    As you can tell from the differing outfits I've been testing the backpack for some time, such a feature-rich product isn't something you can test in a single weekend.
    Hard facts, as usual, before we get to the exciting part:
    - V2 carrying system
    - Separation between main and bottom compartment
    - Snow guard with drawstring and zipper
    - Load control straps
    - Height adjustable chest strap
    - Redirected hip belt pull
    - Circumferential bottom compression
    - Sturdy handle
    - Height adjustable lid with zippered compartment
    - Hydration system preparation
    - Large zippered front opening into main compartment
    - Removable zippered side pockets with a volume of 12 liters each
    - Side pockets
    - Two loops for ice tool, poles or gear
    - Equipment holder for PRC 117, TRM 6020/21 or SEM 70 (German made military radios)
    - Helmet holder
    - MOLLE system
    Dimensions are 83 x 34 x 21 cm, which adds up to a hefty 4.2 kilos of empty weight.
    As I said, not for ultralight fetishists.
    Sure you can build it lighter, but the Mil OPS is supposed to have a long service life, Lycra just doesn´t cut it, pun intended.
    Let's start with the "+24". These are two removable side pockets that can be variably attached to the main body thanks to ample Molle.
    [​IMG]
    Fixed Molle straps, outlet for cable, drinking tube or antenna.
    Also included, a sturdy carrying strap, if the bag is used as a ammo carrier, very handy.
    [​IMG]
    That's how I'm going to go with it:
    [​IMG]
    3 liter water bladder, 1 liter Platypus, 0.5 liter Nalgene and plenty of room for more.
    The water bladder is held in place at the bottom by a half-height mesh pocket:
    [​IMG]
    Also built into both bags, a Velcro tab along with a loop for attachment at the top.
    Speaking of the loop:
    Hydrate or die, especially in the field you can neither have enough water or ammo.
    Both heavy AF, but unavoidable.
    That's why the Mil OPS has velcro tabs and loops in the side pockets as well as some in the top of the main compartment:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Attached to the top right and left of the side walls is here so even more space for the cool wet.
    Here in the picture a Thermarest, my long-time companion when it's rather cool to:
    [​IMG]
    Unfortunately rather bulky, but good sleep is important.
     
    RogerStenning likes this.
  2. Thehunt

    Thehunt Loaded Pockets

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    This is how it looks in comparison, water on the right, air mattress on the left:
    [​IMG]
    ...Quasimodo the hunchback sends his regards.
    Since there is enough Molle, you can mount the side pockets closer to the back and thus to the center of gravity when carrying a heavy load, very practical!
    [​IMG]
    09503204krg.jpg][​IMG][/url]
    Now let's take a look at the "sleeping bag compartment".
    Whether you use it as such or stow gear there for quick access, if it's too small, you're in for trouble.
    The compartment is protected and supported by circumferential straps that allow bulky items to be mounted on top or, if needed, on the bottom.
    Foam mats, inflatable small boats, fins, that sort of thing.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Good to see the two lower loops for ice, ski or shooting sticks. An axe fits as well, of course.
    Lockable zippers may also not be missing:
    [​IMG]
    Of course, also here the short version to the bottom compartment:
    How is it with the Defence 4? (Standard issue Military sleeping bag in the German army)
    No issue, fits easily.
    But that would be too boring for me (and in this case also too warm), so here is a complete sleeping setup:
    At first glance:
    [​IMG]
    And then here are the actual contents:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Defence 1 (intermediate bag) with liner in stuff sack, mesh bag with cord, pegs and bungee cord, 3x3 meter tarp, pillow (I said it before, sleep is really important), Goretex bivvie bag, spare underwear. And again, plenty of room for even more.
    And the wild ride continues, on to the main compartment. I got lost in there once, it's so big....
    Joking aside: To get to the main compartment there are three ways.
    You open the partition from the sleeping bag compartment and reach in from below.
    Known, practical and long proven.
    Open the lid and reach in from the top.
    Snow skirt and separate drawstring included:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    (Very cool, by the way, the small toggle, if the backpack should be emptier occasionally, so you can also compress the top part)
    Thoughtful, the extra zipper that lets you quickly reach into the inner compartment:
    [​IMG]
    Spot on!
    So, these two options are great and really thoughtfully implemented in detail, but not really new.
    This one is:
    [​IMG]
    Detach the front flap on both sides (for helmets, ammo cans, wet gear, etc.).
    To reveal Extra-Molle and Shockcord, as well as the upper straps for the already mentioned sticks. If you like you can remove the helmet flap, just undo the Velcro straps.
    [​IMG]
    At the bottom, loosen the front flap:
    [​IMG]
     
    RogerStenning likes this.
  3. Thehunt

    Thehunt Loaded Pockets

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    Now the tactical user has direct access to the main compartment, never seen it done like this before.
    Here in the picture both side pockets, packed crosswise.
    [​IMG]
    However, one more special feature hides under the pockets:
    Four adjustable and, if necessary, removable straps to attach cargo.
    Here on the example of the "water bag":
    [​IMG]
    Meant initially for radios, hence the zipper to engage from above. Somehow you have to get to the controls, this is how.
    Very clever.
    Since the sum of equipment quickly adds up to quite a bit of weight, there is a comfortable handle above the helmet flap to maneuver this beast:
    [​IMG]
    Let's move on to the backpacks side.
    On both sides we find very generously sized pockets, the Nalgene Oasis disappears completely, the 42 Oz Klean Kanteen fits easily!
    [​IMG]
    Directly above we find, also on both sides, two straps, the upper one for compression, the lower one (removable) to mount skis, long guns, spare tubes or similar without loss.
    [​IMG]
    Since it is well known that all good rings come in twos, the counterparts are found on the top of the main compartment:
    [​IMG]
    Again, compression is fixed, mounting straps are removable.
    On to the lid compartment.
    The lid is height adjustable, the entire backpack can be overpacked with it, and how!
    [​IMG]
    The upper buckles are for height adjustment, next to them are the two pass throughs for cables, drinking tubes and the like.
    Below that the buckles of the upper load control straps.
    Quite classic with handle:
    [​IMG]
    Another special feature is the three mounting points for the load control straps.
    On the one hand, they serve to bring the center of gravity to the carrier in case of extreme overloading upwards.
    On the other hand, the carrying system offers such a wide height adjustment, that from very small back lengths to very large an optimal setting is guaranteed.
    [​IMG]
    Now we take a look at the lid.
    In addition to two Velcro areas (back and front) for name tapes and the so popular patches, we find a small zipper pocket.
    I actually hadn't noticed this one at first.
    [​IMG]
    Here Tasmanian Tiger hides a small repair kit, with cord and buckles. Great!
    [​IMG]
    I have my headlamp in here, fits great.
    [​IMG]
    The top lid compartment is basic, but generous in size:
    [​IMG]
    A carabiner for keys or similar, that's it.
    The inside compartment is big enough for a first aid kit, or as in my case extra power bank, cables and small stuff. Good to see the elastic on the sides to keep the lid snug.
    [​IMG]
    Next stop, the carrying system.
    From my point of view, the absolute most important thing on any backpack. And if you have to carry 50 kilos through the bush, then all the more.
    [​IMG]
    This is the proven V2 system, but with a few improvements.
    For one thing, the hip belt is firmly attached.
    I can absolutely understand the fans of the Warrior Belt system, remove the waist belt, equip, on the stalk we go.
    For my use case nothing but superfluous, so from me the thumbs up for the fixed belt!
    [​IMG]
    Super comfortable the pads, I had no pressure points or sore/hot spots.
    But, as I never tire of emphasizing, please try it out for yourself!
    It must fit you, like the proverbial glove.
     
    RogerStenning likes this.
  4. Thehunt

    Thehunt Loaded Pockets

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    Another innovation: the hip belt is double sinched:
    [​IMG]
    Thus, you pull forward and can apply more force than when you pull backward:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Very wide and firmly padded, the waist belt:
    [​IMG]
    The lower load control straps are also well placed.
    For me, it wouldn't have needed the three Molle loops, but better to have than to need.
    Here you can see parts of the load transfer system, inside the pack two complementary aluminum struts are doing their part.
    [​IMG]
    Of course, an adjustable chest strap must not be missing:
    [​IMG]
    Supplementary a loop for small to medium carabiners, I have my gloves on it.
    On the right side there is a flat strap at that point:
    [​IMG]
    And of course the shoulder strap is fully adjustable and well padded:
    [​IMG]
    I'm really having fun with the Mil OPS 80+24.
    Very variable, very large when needed, and highly modular.
    Once again the detail solutions convince me.
    Certainly not a lightweight, but that is not the focus.
    Here it is about maximum endurance time and that the Mil OPS can provide very well.
    I'm very happy with the backpack and that it helps make our guys and gals life in the field and their mission a little easier.
    [​IMG]
     
    RogerStenning likes this.