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First gun-stories and tips?

Discussion in 'Handguns' started by USA^3, Feb 3, 2014.

  1. Saffa2

    Saffa2 Loaded Pockets

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    Great responses guys. Makes me think about my own situation as a young guy who has grown up around guns and regularly works with guns. Maturity is a big factor and its the odd case when someone else except an older self can tell you whether you are mature enough to carry or not.
     
    USA^3 likes this.
  2. Slipjoint

    Slipjoint Loaded Pockets

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    I would not recommend a 1911 for your first gun. Personally, I like them, but they *are* a finicky pistol. They require a lot more attention, devotion, and maintenance that more modern pistols do. You need to change out springs and extractors regularly. Also, a lot of them are a bit out of spec off the shelf, which can lead to the pistol battering itself to death.

    But understand that a 1911 is going to cost you a serious chunk of money. You can get a nice one and then have a 1911 smith give it a once over just to make sure it's ship-shape. Or you'll get a cheap one that will require lots of gunsmithing to be a serious carry pistol. Or you can go cheap and take your chances on a gun that might very either be unreliable or will shoot itself into scrap. Even under optimal conditions the 1911 will have a much shorter lifespan than modern auto pistols.

    The 1911 is also huge and heavy. This makes it more difficult to conceal and it also makes it less likely that you'll be carrying it when you need it. It weighs about 2 and a half pounds empty and those spare mags of fat .45 acp will start adding up fast.

    For your first gun, I would suggest something that's versatile and rock-solid reliable. The Glock 19 is considered to be one the greatest pistols of all time because it's incredibly rugged and reliable. It conceals nicely, and packs 15 rounds in a package that is light, compact, low maintenance, and easy to shoot. Glocks regularly survive abuse that would render most other pistols into scrap (Google Glock torture test sometime).

    For the guy who only owns one pistol, this would be my recommendation.

    I'm not saying you should never own a 1911, but I would recommend that you get something more practical first. There's an old saying: "1911s are what you show your freinds, Glocks are what you show your enemies."

    :bounce:
     
    Lou_G likes this.
  3. Slipjoint

    Slipjoint Loaded Pockets

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    For me, it's all about having options because carry conditions can change from day to day. I generally roll with a smaller gun these days. A J-frame .38 is my preferred daily CCW pistol (unless I have reason to expect trouble). It's relatively light and compact, but comes in a capable caliber. I also find that it's much easier to check the status of a revolver than an auto (something I do every time a handgun comes on or off my person).

    If I'm expecting potential trouble (bad neighborhood/city, or some kind of unrest) then the Glock (or something similar) is my choice. Probably with a couple of spare mags.

    On the other hand, I also have smaller guns, just in case I want to lighten the load a bit. I have been known to carry an NAA mini-revolver or mini-auto for those times where lighter clothing is the order of the day, or when I'm at a very low threatcon. As a bonus, these smaller guns make nice backups when you want a little something extra.
     
  4. tmedina

    tmedina EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Free gun tip:

    When dealing with a semi-automatic handgun, clear the magazine first - then the chamber.

    Trust me, do not reverse the process.
     
    USA^3 and MedusaOblongata like this.
  5. Lee Bradbury

    Lee Bradbury Loaded Pockets

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    I don't have a massive amount of experience with firearms, restrictions in the UK used to be tough and are so tough nowadays that nobody (except the Police, Military and street gangs) can own a pistol except an air-pistol.

    However, I used to own shotguns before I gave up shooting and I can say this;

    1. Think what you want it for.
    2. Draw up a short list, through research, of what you think you'll like.
    3. Handle each weapon. Strip them down and rebuild them to see how you get on with them.
    4. Think for a bit longer.
    5. Buy the one you've now got at the top of your 'Want' list; if you can't afford it then wait until you can.

    The first shotgun I bought was a 2nd hand Aya side-by-side 12 bore after seeing it at a gun shop but found I just couldn't get on with it.
    Funnily I ended up with a Baikal over-and-under 12 bore and although it's the AK47 of the shotgun world (the sound and recoil of their cartridges let you know you're alive!) and cheap as chips it was lovely to shoot with.
     
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  6. MedusaOblongata

    MedusaOblongata Loaded Pockets

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    That's great!
     
  7. randylahey

    randylahey Loaded Pockets

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    I think there's alot of good advice here. I have 3 guns currently but have owned about 8. My first gun was a Springfield xdm 9mm. I didn't shoot any handguns before buying my first one and my biggest advice is to shoot at least 10 different guns of differing calibers and operation prior to buying. I decided that In preferred the 45 acp to 9mm for my own reasons (not starting a caliber war) so that lead me to buy a 1911 which I loved. Once conceal carry became an option in Illinois I decided I would never actually carry a 1911 (size as well as single action), so I traded that for an HK 45c, once i decided that the only way I personally would feel comfortable carrying is with a DA/SA decocked safety off.

    There's so many variables. The more you shoot and research prior the better you'll be. Trading in guns is not fun. You lose your #$@ on them financially. Plus, as someone mentioned, the gun is only part of the hobby. Holsters, spare mags, sights, ammo, etc, all play in. I bought my 9mm, a stockpile of rounds, new sights, 2 holsters, 5 spare mags, and then a year later decided I didn't want it anymore lol. I still have 9mm rounds sitting around and don't even own one. Go to a range, rent a new gun a week, research, join a local IDPA or some training classes, and then buy. That is, unless you have money to lose:)
     
  8. randylahey

    randylahey Loaded Pockets

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    One more piece of advice: Don't always rely on the gun salesperson to "talk you into" a gun. They sell based on bonuses from the manufacturer. I can guarantee you that if you walk in a store looking for a Glock, they will show you a Springfield xd as well. Happened to myself and everyone I know who owns a gun.

    Get what you want, what you like shooting, and what feels good to you. Specifically, Glocks are fabulous first owner guns cost and function wise, if you are comfortable with single action only. I agree I wouldn't recommend a 1911 for a first gun. If you have the money, I'm a big fan of HK's and Sigs. Also, don't discount a revolver. They're not "cool", but they are much more reliable, easy to maintain, and many are chambered in both 357 and 38, which covers both self defense and practice.
     
  9. Weko

    Weko Loaded Pockets

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    Talk to people who will let you try their firearms and try as many as you can before you decide. At a minimum, 50 to 100 rounds of factory ammo is not unreasonable (you provide the ammo if you can and extra for the owner will make you a lot more popular) If there are any clubs in your area that will let you participate in their events, ppc, ipsc even cowboy will give you an idea of what it is like to carry, draw and shoot safely. I hated the M9 when I shot for qualification but really liked a Hi- power. Also did not care for the feel of a S&W .45 auto but could shoot it well at 50 yds. Each gun will feel different to you and you will find some will fit you better than others. Also, do not neglect to practice with whatever load you decide to carry. Once met a woman who could consistantly put 50 rounds of .38 +p ammo into a 2 " circle with a 2" revolver at 50 yards one handed. Not someone I would want to be on the receiving end