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First Aid kit organizational question

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by kdunnett, Mar 25, 2009.

  1. kdunnett

    kdunnett Loaded Pockets

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    I have a medimum sized homemade first ait kit for the home thats kind of organized by objects (in one ziplock there are 4"x4", in another there are bandaids, etc).

    I've seen some kits where there are packaged items for a purpose, say one labelled 'burns', and have items related to treat that purpose just in those packages.

    Is there some thing somewhere that I can use as a reference point to build up this packages? I can see something like 'trauma', 'burns', 'boo-boo', 'protection', 'meds', 'splinters' type of packages in a first aid kit. But I'm at a lost at what to put into each package to cover all what the package label requires of it.

    Any ideas?
     
  2. Synaptic Misfire
    • In Omnia Paratus

    Synaptic Misfire Loaded Pockets

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    Modules help when folks not familiar with you kit have to use it. My disaster kit is being redesigned and I am still considering whether or not to go this route. I'm not sure if this would slow you down in an extreme trauma situation where you may consume the module quickly or you have a bleeder and one or two sponges is insufficient.

    I keep some basic divisions. In my IFAK I have one of each wound care item in a ziploc to prevent damage or contamination under adverse conditions to my other wound care supplies. I have a meds module and one for non emergency care.

    This list is just shooting from the hip.

    Wound care - 1 each Telfa, 4x4 gauze, sponge, betadine prep pad(2 ea), kerlix roll, steri strips and trauma dressing.

    Non-emergency - Moleskin, Sunblock, A&D Ointment, baby wipes, tweezers, benadryl spray and chap stick.

    Meds - Self explanitory

    Burns - Beyond my IFAK capabilities short of a few packets of burn gel.
     
  3. JIM

    JIM Loaded Pockets

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    If your main goal is to quickly control blood-loss, you could place a pair of gloves, some 4x4's, an ABD-pad and a roll of Kerlix in a ziplock bag to form a 'Heavy bleeding' module.
     
  4. chmsam

    chmsam Loaded Pockets

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    The average family would do better to have training and practice in first aid. Cannot stress that enough and I ought to work harder on practicing what I preach (I'm wayyy outta date). As part of and/or after that there are courses and publications from the Red Cross that cover what to carry/have on hand. Good place to start. Also, ready.gov can get people started.

    That said I find that for FAK's especially but any EDC in general, it is a tough call as to spend time, space, and money to make things accessible for anyone or just stick to what works for me. From experience I can tell you that no one wants to learn how someone else does it unless it is in "formal" training. Hey, does an "FAK's For Dummies" exist? Wow, that's a really scary thought...
     
  5. kdunnett

    kdunnett Loaded Pockets

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    Good idea Jim.

    I'm looking at others possibly using the first aid kit, including my wife. Its just easier for her to grab the 'trauma' (or 'heavy bleeding') module and have what you need for the job instead of hunting around for what you need in an unfamiliar kit.

    'heavy bleeding' is an easy kit... but what about 'burns'?

    'protection' is an another easy one... gloves, n95 or higher masks, etc.

    Is there other common modules to consider?



    Chmsam,

    This is more of a home first aid kit. I know, its an 'edc' forum, but the best spot I know of where I can post a question like this.

    Training and practice is one thing, getting to the stuff you need to do the patching up is another.
     
  6. JIM

    JIM Loaded Pockets

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    The problem is that organisation adds bulk. 'Treat first what kills first', in a FAK that would be bleeding control and cardiac arrest. If you have a seperate bleeder-module and a CPR-mask that is easely pulled from the FAK, it should be possible to have all the other FA-stuff not organised by injury, but by how it fits in your FAK.
     
  7. chmsam

    chmsam Loaded Pockets

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    JIM makes a good point.

    Also, the earlier point I was trying to make is that since other people read these posts, the average person with just basic training will do better, and if need be they can make do even if they have less supplies. "Be prepared" also means "be trained." Of course more accidents happen in the home than anywhere else. So even a basic first aid course is going to help more than having gear and not truly knowing how to use it. Add to that the fact that doing something with all the right intentions but wrong or no training can be bad.

    No reflection on anyone here but the reason I say this is that I know too many people who have a lot of stuff and just because they have it (and even worse, because some of them spent a lot of money on it), they figure they know how to use it, maybe through osmosis. Not just FAK's but tools, cars, firearms, etc. Most people I know like that are untrained are bloody dangerous. Giving untrained aid in a trauma could be as dangerous as an untrained driver or "marksman." Heck, I know people with huge FAK's who wouldn't know enough to call 911 before trying to treat a severed artery.

    All I am saying is that first aid courses are cheap & easy, and while someone might already know everything they'll be teaching you, I'd be willing to bet that there are a lot of people who have some dangerous misconceptions about minor stuff, let alone serious trauma.
     
  8. kdunnett

    kdunnett Loaded Pockets

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    Good point.
     
  9. Andy_L

    Andy_L Loaded Pockets

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    All my first aid kits/medic bag are set up so that I come to things in the order that I or someone else will need them.

    In a house/car FAK you could have a roll where you travel from one end to the other

    My medical bag goes
    gloves/gauze and wound cleaning
    dressings
    burns
    sports injuries treatment (support bandages, cold packs)
    triangula bandages/tape
    clean up

    In the pocket is stuff like space blankets


    In a small kit you wont have stuff so seperated but gloves and CPR mask will be the first thing followed by something to stop the bleeding
     
  10. mercurial

    mercurial Empty Pockets

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    Ours are organized by space savings generally, to make the best use of space, and to present easily.
    That said, the Ambu CPR mask and a bloodstopper are on top, followed by most used items, like Dora bandaids and antiseptic wipes.

    mercurial