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FAK for dogs?

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by Spyderco1116, Sep 13, 2011.

  1. rocketdog

    rocketdog Loaded Pockets

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    Never...ever...put ketchup on a hot dog. It's just wrong.
     
  2. MTFire

    MTFire Loaded Pockets

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    One thing I haven't seen mentionEd is a powder they use for cuts on a pad of a dog's paw. I can't remember the name of it but it works wonders. I have also used it for nails that are broken too.


    John
     
  3. el chupacabra

    el chupacabra Loaded Pockets

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    Steptic powder?

    Not sure if I'd use it on a cut pad though...
     
  4. MTFire

    MTFire Loaded Pockets

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    I don't know if was styptic powder or not, anyway got it from the Vet and it worked wonders for the pads.

    John
     
  5. aaronu

    aaronu Loaded Pockets

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    Especially without mayonnaise.
     
  6. aaronu

    aaronu Loaded Pockets

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    Yep -- styptic powder. Most pet shops sell it in the grooming section next to the doggie nail clippers. For obvious reasons.
     
  7. aaronu

    aaronu Loaded Pockets

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    The term "hot dog" didn't throw me, but I did get confused when you referred to a Dachshund as an actual dog...

    LOL just kidding!

    There are some dedicated canine first aid kits and several good books out there. Just go to amazon.com and type in "canine first aid" and you'll get a ton of kits, books, etc. I think you'll find that much of the aid stuff for humans will work well with dogs as well. I suggest one of the "Well Fed" kits plus the American Red Cross doggie first aid book. QuikClot makes a pet version called PetClot that would be a good addition as well. I'd make sure to have enough gauze for splinting, a tick/splinter remover, some sort of shaver for hair removal around wounds, a lampshade collar (Comfy Cone or Kong Cloud) and a leather glove to help you handle a possibly panicked dog.

    Just like with "people" first aid kits, knowledge is the most important part. No matter what else you do, pick up a good veterinary first aid book.

    Assuming you are like the rest of us mortals and not rolling in a huge pile of large denomination federal reserve notes, build up your kit a bit at a time. Buy a book, use it to inform your choice of a basic kit (prefab or DIY) then slowly add the other bits as your lunch money builds up.

    And all jokes aside -- pets are companions but they are also a responsibility. It is refreshing to see someone taking that responsibility seriously.

    Cheers,

    Aaron
     
  8. jnsn

    jnsn Loaded Pockets

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    myfriends dog got attacked by another dog and had some pretty nasty bite wounds on his face, they 1st used peroxide and that caused the dogs face to swell up like a pumpkin. im not sure if all dogs are that way but it would be worth investigating. i use betadine for any of my dogs wounds. also hot dog dogs tend to have long flappy ears, i would keep a small amount of ear rinse on hand, we have a lab and try to rinse her ears at least once a month to avoid infections.
     
  9. Spyderco1116

    Spyderco1116 Loaded Pockets

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    I appreciate all the input. I will definitley check out amazon and the books and everything else you mentioned. Very interesting stuff!!
    I hate to see my dog in pain or hurt. Thank God nothing ever serious has ever happened to her. (knock on wood)...
     
  10. Spyderco1116

    Spyderco1116 Loaded Pockets

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    I clean around the outside and dont go that far in. Now should I actually squirt some of the solution in there that I use to clean her ears?
     
  11. Jbum

    Jbum Loaded Pockets

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    Not unless there is a problem. The drier you keep the the less likely hood of infection.
     
  12. CatherineM
    • In Omnia Paratus

    CatherineM Loaded Pockets

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    My new puppy had better leave my shoes alone, or he's going to need the first aid kit.
     
  13. jnsn

    jnsn Loaded Pockets

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    when we use the rinse we squirt it in the ear, close the "ear flap" (for lack of a batter term) and massage the rinse solution in well, then go back with cotton balls removing as much as possible. he told me i wouldnt be able to get my fingers in far enough to hurt anything while using minimum pressure and it worked great, the reason we started in the 1st place is because our pup had a minor infection. he's the one that told me to continue to rinse once a month or so as a precaution. personally i would only worry about dogs that have floppy ears that retain moisture or dirt. please note that i'm im no vet so your results may vary but it worked great on our black lab.
     
  14. aaronu

    aaronu Loaded Pockets

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    +1 jnsn.

    That's the same advice the vet offered for my goldendoodle. Pour it in, massage around the ear opening, then swab carefully with cotton.
     
  15. Shike

    Shike Loaded Pockets

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    I am a vet tech. the doctor that gave Ibuprofen to her dog should have known better. Aspirin and ibuprofen can be given in rare cases and only if your vet recommends it, the dosage is different for dogs than for humans, usually about 2 milligrams /pound of body weight, since the average ibuprofen pill is about 200 milligrams you have to do the math. IMO the risks are too high ( they can cause bleeding ulsers in dogs and a very high risk of kidney failure). Bottom line..........why use it then? Rimadyl is the usual pain med recommended for dogs. And don't even consider giving Aspirin or ibuprofen to a cat, it will be a fatal mistake. Best bet for FAK for your dog is to ask your vet what he/she would recommend.
    Just a side note, veterinary medicine can be more complicated than human medicine, remember as a human doc. you are dealing with only one species:)

    Shike