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Entry level watch purchase

Discussion in 'Watches' started by KAMM, Jun 12, 2012.

  1. KAMM
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    KAMM Loaded Pockets

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    Just saw it. I don't know much of anything bout watches. So if you have anything to tell me please do!
     
  2. Monocrom

    Monocrom Loaded Pockets

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    Got it.

    Most watches use springbars to hold straps and bracelets in place. Seiko and other Japanese brands tend to use fat springbars. If you have the right tool, it's easy to remove and re-attach the two springbars that most watches have. Some watches have lugs which are drilled all the way through. This allows you to pop the springbars out by using a straightened paper-clip to push through the openings of the lugs.

    With a traditional bracelet or 2-piece strap, if one springbar should fail, your watch will fall right off your wrist. However, with a long single-piece strap (including the Zulu variation) or with a NATO strap, if one springbar should fail; your watch isn't falling off your wrist. It stays attached to your wrist thanks to the strap design and the one springbar still left on the watch. Your watch will flap around. But it won't fall off. You get the springbar replaced right away when you have time.

    On some watches though, very few actually, they eliminate the possibility of springbar failure completely . . . They don't use any. Instead of springbars near the top and bottom of the case. The watches use fixed lugs that are actually part of the case. Two solid bars built right into the case itself. Those are not coming off, ever! This means that once you strap on the watch, it's not coming off unintentionally from your wrist. However, not being able to remove those lugs the way you can a pair of springbars means that you're very limited as to strap options. You can use a Zulu strap or other one-piece straps that go through one of the lugs and then out the other one. Or, you can use a NATO strap as well. Two-piece straps are out of the question. Once again, you can take a very thin leather strap that comes in two pieces. One piece goes through the bottom lug just slightly. You then fold over that same amount of leather onto itself, then sew it shut over one of the lugs. Repeat the process with the other piece of the strap through the top lug.

    Honestly though, fixed lugs are meant for NATO or single-piece strap designs (ex: Zulu, or RAF straps.)

    Regarding titanium . . .

    Earlier I posted that under $300 is realistic for a titanium-cased watch. Let me clarify. It's realistic for a high-quality titanium case. Titanium cases will either be extremely difficult to scratch, or ridiculously easy to scratch. I have a Citizen BM7080-03E model. Have had it for nearly two years. It literally looks brand new. I don't baby it, yet it looks as good as the day I first saw her. That's what you get with a high-quality titanium case. With other titanium cases, they're going to be scratch magnets. It's like trying to stop a 3-week old puppy from wanting to play. Good luck with that! You still get the advantage of light-weight and yes; it's real titanium. But realistically, most Ti watches end up looking less than ideal after a couple of months.
     
  3. KAMM
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    Wow. Thank you do much. I really want to get into watches and this info helped me a lot. Thank you!
     
  4. KAMM
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    So is bertucci not high quality ti?
     
  5. Monocrom

    Monocrom Loaded Pockets

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    You're Welcome. Happy to help. If you want to learn even more about watches, the various brands, movements, dirty politics involved, (sorry, very hard to avoid that last one; even if you try) check out the forums over at Watchuseek.com

    Huge watch forum where veteran members tend to be very helpful. (Just be sure to use the search feature first though.) Also, yes; you will run into a great deal of pretentious snobbery. Though the "Affordables" forum contains less of that.

    As for Bertucci, the price speaks for itself I'm afraid. I've seen Bertucci watches with Ti cases that looked as though the cases went through a chipper shredder. But if you want a very good EDC watch that you don't have to worry about babying, the Ti Bertucci models are still a good choice. If you're worried about looks, then they're not the best choice.
     
  6. KAMM
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    Alright sir. So what would you suggest for a to watch with a cloth or resin strap that I don't have to baby and won't get scratched up?
     
  7. Monocrom

    Monocrom Loaded Pockets

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    My first choice would be a G-Shock.
     
  8. KAMM
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    For a titanium watch? Oh my phone auto corrected to "to".
     
  9. SecretMember

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  10. Monocrom

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    For a Titanium watch, I'd have to recommend any model from Citizen with a titanium case. There are quite a few. Not just the BM7080-03E model That I have. Citizen knows how to make titanium cases properly. Plus, their exclusive Eco-Drive technology is excellent. Unfortunately, Citizen does a poor job of advertising it. Basically, you get all the advantages of quartz movement without the biggest disadvantage of the battery dying on you at any moment. Usually anywhere from 1 to as much as 5 years down the road. With 2 or 3 years being the most common.

    Despite what Citizen claims, yes; you will need to replace the battery inside a Citizen Eco-Drive model. However, it'll be anywhere from 5 to 10 years before that'll realistically happen. The battery itself is a solar-powered one. Sunlight or artificial light hits the dial to keep the battery charged up. The technology is a bit more advanced than simply having a solar-powered watch. Power reserve of the battery is 6 months when fully charged. You still enjoy the accuracy and toughness of a well-made quartz watch though. In about 5 to 10 years when the battery is completely dead, you simply contact Citizen and make arrangements to have the watch shipped back to Japan for a new rechargeable cell. Doesn't sound ideal. But when Citizen replaces the cell, they'll pressure test the watch as well so that it maintains its water-resistance rating.

    Since Citizen is the single biggest watch company in the world, it also means that they'll very likely be around a decade from now. So, you will be able to get your Eco-Drive model serviced properly.
     
  11. KAMM
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    Thanks for all the wonderful info! I'll look into those watches.
     
  12. jzmtl

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    I don't buy the idea of solar watches, they sound cool on paper but offers little practical advantages. Like you said they need to replace the battery in 5~10 years, well the regular battery in mine last 5 years and there are models that last 10 years. And when the time comes it's $5 and 10 minutes at walmart for a new one, or if you so desire there's the service center.

    This is my watch, titanium casing, sapphire window, 5 year battery and warranty, $145.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. KAMM
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    What's that watch?
     
  14. powerring
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    You're right. Eventually the rechargeable battery in a solar watch will die. I think the cool thing about solar watches is that it often allows a watch with a higher power draw and more functions to go longer between battery changes. A Casio Pathfinder with extras like a compass suck down a bit more power than a watch with fewer functions. If you've ever changed the batteries in one of these, with all the waterproof grommets, etc. you don't want to do it again for as long as possible. ;-)
     
  15. jzmtl

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    Momentum Atlas, large size.



    In the case of pathfinder, the rechargeable cell has such small capacity (18 mah, cr2032 is 240) that frequent compass use can quickly suck it dry which will take literally days to charge again, so for a full function ABC watch solar is a pretty bad choice. Not sure about other watches but my Suunto core use a 2032 and change battery is as easy as unscrew the back cover with the new battery you are about to put in.

    Solar watch just isn't good until we have more efficient panels and better batteries
     
  16. powerring
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    I've never drained it in my use. I'm on year six now with the same battery. A Suunto Core (which is a beautiful watch by the way) supposedly lasts 12-18 months on a 2032. Hopefully, by the time I have to replace the battery in this watch solar panels and rechargeable batteries will have improved to the point where we never have to worry about it anymore. :)
     
  17. KAMM
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    I member just posted this and I fell in love! Anyone else own one?

    [​IMG]
     
  18. mooshi
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    Junkers Cockpit large date? I think they changed out the wrist strap.
     
  19. KAMM
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    Yah he changed it to a Zulu strap. The face is just so pretty but I've only found one review on it via amazon.
     
  20. Monocrom

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    Wal-Mart is good for strap changes. As for battery replacement, no way. Not if you want the watch to keep its water-resistance rating. Also, the vast majority of quartz watches don't come close to 5 years of operation before a battery change is needed. And, those that do, often suffer from inaccurate time keeping issues. My old Timex Expedition is pushing 4 years on the same battery. Still runs. But not consistently. It runs slow, and sometimes stops. Starts up again eventually. I mean, if the vast majority of quartz watches had long-life (non-solar) batteries that were good for half a decade or a full one; then Citizen's Eco-Drive line would not nearly be as successful as it is.