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EMT tapped me on the shoulder in Walgreen's

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by GregGates, Oct 22, 2008.

  1. MacGnG

    MacGnG Loaded Pockets

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    when i took bio and chem lab we only used the purple nitrile ones. and im pretty sure they used those too, last time i donated blood. i liked the nitrile over the latex for better feel and they werent all dusty.
     
  2. nezza1694

    nezza1694 BST/Marketplace ban

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    I am a Mountain Rescue member,so i get Nitrile gloves and medical supplies for free ;D
     
  3. grimm_kaosboy

    grimm_kaosboy Empty Pockets

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    +1 on purple nitrile gloves. I got them in my FAK as well as a bunch sitting in my desk at work for when I'm dealing with the messy stuff. Hydraulic fluid, 140wt gear oil, lithium grease, etc....
     
  4. Dr Jekell
    • Administrator
    • In Omnia Paratus

    Dr Jekell I had fun once, It was awful.
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    Here is the definitive answer to it all.

    The gloves are there to protect YOU!!!

    They provide a bodily fluid barrier to reduce the risk of YOU getting infections/virus's etc from your patients.

    Here are my thoughts:

    Latex - 99.99% of Pt's are not going into anaphylatic shock because you use latex gloves.

    Pros - Cheaper to buy, mold to you hand (when sized correctly) allowing for greater sense of touch
    Cons - They degrade with time after the box is opened (increasing the risk of the gloves ripping) so they are better used if you use them regularly (eg Treating Pt's, working on dirty jobs etc)

    Nitrale - These are becoming popular with EMS due to increased resistance to rips & tears (there by reducing the chances of the medic getting a infection from the pt), also for the shelf life & resistance to chemicals.

    Pros - Will show rips & tears better, & last longer when stored
    Cons - They tend to be thicker reducing your sense of touch, they are more expensive, they can be harder to get on due to reduced stretch in the gloves.

    Personally I mostly use nitrale due to the environments that I work in but I also have a supply of latex gloves that I use when I need a finer touch.

    Each persons needs are different eg if you work in an office building latex glove would be fine, but if you work around machinery nitrale would be a better choice.

    These are just my 0.02 Lumens & YMMV
     
  5. Claren

    Claren Loaded Pockets

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    When they need a fine, discriminative touch (hunting for a vein to stick), most of the the nurses I work with just rip the index finger open on their non-dominant gloved hand, exposing the distal phalange. They obviously won't do this if the person is a HIV-er or is known to have Hep C.
     
  6. ccpmedic

    ccpmedic Loaded Pockets

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    Not very smart. ALL patients should be treated with universal precautions when the need is warrented. This protects the care giver from exposure, as well as protecting the patient from the care giver. You should be proficent in your skills wilh PPE in place. I don't think a Surgeon would remove their gloves during surgery to allow for better dexterity.
    Roy
     
  7. Minotaur

    Minotaur Loaded Pockets

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    This is a very strange thread.

    First do no harm.

    So using latex, and finding out that the person has a class 1 reaction is not a good thing.

    If you want some really nice gloves, find yourself a car worker. The gloves they use for break pad fitting in the factories are brillant. A lot like the police neddle stick gloves.

    If you have to wear them a lot, stop washing your hands, and use an antibacterial gel. They really dry your hands out, and provide a hot enviroment for disease. I have taken a pair off in just above freezing conditions, and my hands were soaked in sweat.
     
  8. Edwood

    Edwood Loaded Pockets

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    I use nitrile gloves primarily for dealing with nasty chemicals, paints, etc. So keeping extras in case of first aid use is a no brainer for me.
     
  9. Arkansas_Ranger

    Arkansas_Ranger Empty Pockets

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    The risk of a latex allergy is rather minimal. I carry nothing around but latex gloves. Nitrile is nice so that you don't have to worry about the latex issue, but in past experience on the ambulance the issue never came up. Usually I think we forget to ask if people are allergic to latex, but in all my patient encounters I only met one person who said they didn't want me using latex gloves. Maybe just keep a pair of nitrile around for safety sake, but if you're going to buy some personally for a kit then get thick latex.

    Try www.galls.com
     
  10. lexmedic157

    lexmedic157 Loaded Pockets

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    Being in contact with patients everyday I would be more than willing (I can't see why other EMS providers wouldn't do the same) to give someone several pairs of gloves off my truck if they came up to me asking for some for a FAK. That's just me, it doesn't cost me anything, and it's advocating pre-pre-hospital patient care. Feel free to ask!
     
  11. Chinaman

    Chinaman Empty Pockets

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    I would say use what you have. And in the end anaphylaxis is treatable and death isn't.
     
  12. csogbk

    csogbk Empty Pockets

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    I'd like to recomend North American Rescue Products excelent Nitrile Bear Claw Glove Kit. This is a low cost "bag" of 25 pairs of gloves packaged in pairs, great for BOKs, FA Kits, your man purse, etc. The gloves are strong, free of allergens, allow great dexterity. My BOK is currently packed with Black Talon gloves from NARP. I also carry them as a street cop in Washington DC and carred they as a Combat Medic. I have yet to have a pair tear under any circumstance. Link is:
    http://www.narescue.com/Bear_Claw_Glove_Kit-CN54EEBF698F12.html?BC=64393C540AB3
     
  13. Chinaman

    Chinaman Empty Pockets

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    those are great gloves but my only qulam with them is that during a heat of the moment situation the gloves are very difficult to open. They are especially difficult to open when they have been in a bag through changes in temp.

    Although my experiences with these gloves were in the Afghanistan. Probably the worst environment to work in next to arctic conditions.
     
  14. weeneldo

    weeneldo Empty Pockets

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    With the British Red Cross here in Scotland, and I'm pretty sure all over Britain, we only use nitrile gloves. In fact, with any ambulance, first aid or pharmacy service I've ever worked for, we've only ever used nitrile gloves. I guess its just to absolutely 100% avoid any risk of killing a patient with them and to avoid any risk of sensitisation of workers (which can lead to sick days, legal problems, compensation, requires health and safety investigation, loads of paperwork etc). Nitrile gloves over here are about the same price as latex gloves (both ~£5/$7 for a box of 100). Even if you don't cause anaphylaxis in a patient, you still stand a chance of them coming in to the first aid post with a blister and leaving with a horrible rash. For that reason I'd only use nitrile gloves unless I really had no choice.