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EMT tapped me on the shoulder in Walgreen's

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by GregGates, Oct 22, 2008.

  1. GregGates

    GregGates Empty Pockets

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    Have been picking up a few new things in order to form up a better FAK. I was in Walgreen's last night, I needed a jar of ibuprofen and noticed a sale on gloves. I was thinking of vinyl due to mentions of latex allergy and so I was looking at a box. A young woman customer stopped by and asked why I was going to buy those vinyl gloves. I explained my first aid kit and concern for anyone I was potentially helping with it and she seemed impressed by the thought. She did go on to say that they used latex for fit and dexterity and warned me of the lunch lady fit and tear risk of vinyl. In addition I asked her about the seriousness of a latex reaction and she didn't seem too worried about it. I ended up saving a few bucks and taking her up on an offer for some free ones she had in the car.

    I saw in another post someone mentioning Nitrile, which I suppose may be the best of both worlds. My main concern with gloves is keeping a helper safe from blood or fluids. So anyone that may need use of my FAK in the future, be warned I am packing latex!
     
  2. ddashner

    ddashner Loaded Pockets

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    It would seem to me that in a situation where you needed gloves to help someone with your FAK (presence of blood) the possibility of an allergic reaction to latex would be of minimal importance compared to the initial trauma.
     
  3. BillCurnow

    BillCurnow Loaded Pockets

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    That's all I carry. As you pointed out, great protection without the worry of allergic reactions. The Purple Nitrile I use are a little thicker than most and feature textured finger tips to help with grip.
     
  4. jag-engr
    • Administrator

    jag-engr Semper Bufo!
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    The purple nitrile gloves are readily available, tougher than latex, and provide a better chemical barrier. The chemical barrier may not be an issue for first aid, but it could come in handy with other emergency uses.
     
  5. DaveT

    DaveT Loaded Pockets

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    Costco has two boxes of 150-count nitrile gloves for about $15. I now have them in all my first aid kits and also use them for painting, gluing, and various jobs around the house where I'm dealing with something nasty. A great buy at the price.

    Dave
     
  6. VVR41TH

    VVR41TH Empty Pockets

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    Granted, it's not an in-person source, but you can get a 100 box for $7 online if you shop around... cheaper if you buy in bulk (i.e. a 6 pack for $30).
     
  7. ScottAW

    ScottAW Loaded Pockets

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    Not really a good deal..but cool... I was at lowe's today and they have 12 packs of mr clean nitrile gloves, in neat little vaccum packed ziploc bags for $2. It didn't say anything about medical on the bag, but since most gloves aren't sterile anyways...it's a great packaging to throw in a bag.
     
  8. Corporal Punishment

    Corporal Punishment Empty Pockets

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    I don't have a problem with the performance of the old Latex gloves. If that's what was available (for free) that's what I grabbed. They're handy for jotting down patient care notes, and playing "Rooster Man". But my thing with Latex gloves is the smell. Hours after I've worn them, even after most thorough scrub-up with lots of suds and soap, I can still smell the rubbery Latex smell on my hands. I don't know if it's just me, or maybe it was a borderline sensitivity to Latex. So I was an early adopter of Nitrile, light blue, purple, and black.
     
  9. Rémy

    Rémy Empty Pockets

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    Allergic reactions with Latex may happen when you
    1. use powdered Latex gloves
    AND 2. wear gloves nearly all the time at work

    If you are concerned that the guy you're helping might have some "diseases" then do what the Pro does.
    In such situations where you have to deal with lots of blood we wear 2 pairs of gloves (a pair on top of another one).
    Heavy Nitril gloves usually are used in laboratories with some high risk material. No need to use that one in a first aid situation.
    You're not going to put some injections/infusions on someone so the no.1 reason why Paramedics get infected with HIV etc. is not going to happen.


    Latex gloves are just fine. The Pros still use them...
     
  10. Bubba

    Bubba Loaded Pockets

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    I always assumed the reason to not wear latex gloves was if YOU had the allergy to it.. not the patient

    As it was said the reason you put the gloves on was to fix something that's a lot more serious than the potential for allergic reation to your gloves for a few moments

    I always buy the purple nitrile too (unless I can find the OD green which are also around at times)
    The boxes of purple I buy at walgreens are on sale 2 for 1 fairly often.. that give me 100 (two boxes of 50) for $5 at the walgreens a few blocks away
     
  11. spiritof76

    spiritof76 Loaded Pockets

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    Sounds good. I'll have to stop by Lowe's. Having them prepackaged in pairs would make it worth that price, which isn't terribly unreasonable. Aside from first aid, I like to have rubber gloves for when I have to do unexpected dirty work, like working on my bike. Ever try scrubbing that black chain grease off your hands, even with lava soap?
     
  12. davidt1

    davidt1 Loaded Pockets

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    I found some food-handling gloves at work.

    [​IMG]

    I put a pair in my wallet. Are these OK for rescue work?
     
  13. edcer

    edcer Loaded Pockets

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    I have not been happy with the nitrile gloves from Costco. I have only used about a dozen so far and three or four have ripped when putting them on.They are sized correctly,I have used disposable gloves for years.I bought two boxes so I hope the rest of the gloves are better.
     
  14. Charles1198

    Charles1198 Empty Pockets

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    Nitrile gloves hold up MUCH better in the heat, which is a consideration if you are keeping your gloves in a car FAK.

    When I was helping a friend parkerize gun parts, I could go several hours before the gloves started to break down -- less than a quarter of that with latex. They tell you not to carry condoms in your wallet for a reason!! ;)
     
  15. Claren

    Claren Loaded Pockets

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    That'd be an incorrect assumption; if you had a latex allergy, you wouldn't need to be -told- not to wear them. ;D

    It's for the patient; it seems like every time I'm in a room at work that's out of my size nitrile, and I go to grab latex, the patients ask for me not to (the conscious and responsive ones, anyways).
     
  16. madkins007

    madkins007 Loaded Pockets

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    As a First Aid and bloodborne pathogens instructor and an employee at a rehab facility, I know many places have stopped carrying latex because of the allergies, but there are a few things you should know about them...

    - Frequent wearers or people who work around the stuff are the most likely to have the allergies
    - Most 'lay people' are not allergic, but often request non-latex because they mis-understand the whole allergy bit- they seem to think they can get the allergy by casual contact with latex
    - If you are not allergic, and would only rarely wear them, there is not a major reason to not put them in a FAK
    - If you have a latex allergy, you usually just get mild symptoms, like sneezing or a minor skin rash- 'contact dermatitis' (type 4 allergy)- although a very few people can go into full-blown anaphylatic shock- a life-threatening condition (type 1 allergy, rare)
    - If you are 'type 4 allegic' and touched by a latex-wearing care-giver, the rash is usually a minor nuisance
    - If you are 'type 4 allergic' and have to wear latex gloves a lot, it is a major annoyance
    - Cheap gloves of ANY material rip more easily then better gloves of the same material- thickness and material quality counts

    I prefer Nitrile in my kits, but I would not greatly sweat using latex in an infrequently-used FAK. If you were a frequent rescuer, I would definitely go non-latex though.
     
  17. theotherphil

    theotherphil Loaded Pockets

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    Just a point to note, Vinyl gloves are not rated for the hazards of coming into contact with body fluids. At least, not in the UK. Latex or Nitrile are the ones to get. I personally like the Latex gloves but am finding it more difficult to get hold of. Most Ambulance Services and Hospitals now only carry Nitrile.
     
  18. Rémy

    Rémy Empty Pockets

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    I fully aggree.
    There's some great misunderstanding out there. People who wear powdered Latex gloves during their whole working shift might get a latex allergy.
    But in reality there are lots and lots of units (paramedic and hospital) out there which use powdered latex gloves only.
     
  19. stilus

    stilus Empty Pockets

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    We have at work Latex gloves (i'm working at EMS in Germany) and no one of us is allergic, cause the gloves are not powdered!
    At home i have Latex and Nitril gloves. I like Latex more, cause they are not so thick as Nitril and you have more sensibility at the fingers for working with first-aid equipment.

    You should definetly NOT choose Vinyl, they are too breakable and not elastic.
     
  20. murphquake

    murphquake Empty Pockets

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    NYC Paramedic says: Vinyl gloves sucketh mightily. Use different gloves for different things. My current favorites are light blue nitrile. XL are easier for me to get on, large are snug and make it easier to do delicate work like start IVs. FDNY used to get a brand called Uni Seal's Hi-Risk unpowdered latex gloves that I liked mucho. They were replaced by another brand and now they're going between 3 or 4 suppliers. I only like the older ones. Many people refer to them as "P2's" after another manufacturer/brand of high risk gloves. I like regular latex exam gloves but hate powdered gloves with a passion. I have biggish hands and in many places where a high proportion of the staff is female there are rarely large or extra large gloves available. I always carry plenty of extra gloves on the job and a few pairs on me all the time off. There is a glove dispenser by MicroFlex called the Cuff First that is pretty nice. I got a free sample of it with a pack of each of the types of gloves they offer. I liked the gloves and wore the dispenser on my duty belt for about 2 months before an electric stretcher attacked and killed said belt. Was a handy way to carry gloves and might not be bad for a small pack of gloves that are protected for EDC in larger bags and cases. If I had access to the refills for free I'd use it full time. http://www.microflex.com/Products/Cuff-First-Dispensing-System.aspx The refills are around 4-5 bucks each depending on which ones you get. They have regular glvoes in 20 packs and extended cuffs in 10 packs, the extended cuff model meets NFPA standards if that's an issue for you (won't be for most).
    -bill