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Emergency Overnitght Bag Contents

Discussion in 'The Breakroom' started by Mark9117, Feb 17, 2017.

  1. Mark9117

    Mark9117 Loaded Pockets

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    Greetings all.

    December 26, 2015 I was stranded on a roadside in east central New Mexico during a raging whiteout blizzard. It's a long story but that's not the point. The point is that I was not prepared for that 12 hours or so in my stranded vehicle. I decided I should be more prepared.

    Consequently, I am papered to carry a concealed weapon, own appropriate weapons and regularly travel with at least one. I also put together an overnight bag. In instances where roads are closed, my employer gives sod all whether we make it home or not. There is a rumor that they will pay a hotel room for a night, assuming you can get to a hotel. The last 2 times such a thing has happened, employees were stranded in the building and left to cope. In either case - trapped in my truck, or stranded in a structure not my home, I have a bag for such a short-term contingency. I'd like to share the contents and maybe get some feedback.

    So, first the bag.

    [​IMG]

    Sorry for the color and hasty photography.

    Now, the bag empty.

    [​IMG]

    Here are the contents with notes:

    [​IMG]
    1. Snack food
    2. Space blankets (2)
    3. Cliff bars, chocolate brownie and cheap granola bars
    4. Hand warmers (6)
    5. Emergency radio/flashlight/usb charger (also solar)
    6. USB cable (there are a bunch of cables and a charger that didn't make it into the picture).
    7. Headlamp
    8. MRE, possibly edible, possibly not
    9. 500 feet 550 paracord, orange
    10. Socks and undies (2 pair each)

    [​IMG]


    11. Tactical Shemaugh, olive
    12. Short-sleeved T-shirt, orange (Cabo San Lucas)
    13. Long sleeve T-shirt, gray (sanitized)
    14. Leather work gloves
    15. Automatic blood pressure cuff (wrist model)
    16. Small fleece blanket, gray ("woobie")
    17. Water (2)
    18. Levis 501 jeans, clean
    19. Collapsable cup/bowl
    20. Chemlights (2 each yellow and green)
    21. Morakniv Companion, orange
    22. Dop kit (shaving equipment, toiletries, you know - dop kit)
    23. Moist towlettes
    24. Inexpensive lensatic compass, reasonably accurate
    25. Field notes, black
    26. Notebook for BP and blood sugar log
    27. Blood sugar test kit (with Pilot G2 pen, black)
    28. Zip lock bag, sandwich size
    29. Powerbank with cable
    30. Folding reading light
    31. Flashlight, big and bright
    32. Ganzo folding knife, forget which model
    33. Cell phone battery, extra
    34. Bic disposable lighter, red
    35. Lip balm, cherry
    36. pocket comb
    37. Sugar-free chewing gum
    38. Charms candy, individually wrapped

    And there is a boo-boo kit that didn't make it into the pics. I'll post it separately, but know that it supplements a much larger and more capable FAK that also resides in my vehicle. It's a 2-part kit - boo-boos in the front, blowouts in the back.

    Here is the small boo-boo kit with contents list:

    [​IMG]

    Pouch (from Walmart several years ago)
    Scissors
    Moleskin
    Adhesive tape
    Sunscreen (3)
    Insect protection cream (3)
    1.0% hydrocortisone cream (2)
    Burn cream (3)
    Lip ointment
    Hand sanitizer (2)
    Insect sting relief (3)
    Poison ivy, oak and sumac clenser (3)
    Quick Clean towelettes (lots)
    Adhesive bandages, assorted sizes (lots)

    Do you EDC any such bag?

    Oh, meant to mention that this rig weighs in right at 20 pounds.
     
    Last edited by Mark9117, Feb 18, 2017
    #1 Mark9117, Feb 17, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2017
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  2. Mark9117

    Mark9117 Loaded Pockets

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    Probably ought to show this as well. It's my "keychain" and I EDC it if I'm driving. As you can see, keys are kind of an afterthought. The two pill fobs are a morning and an evening dose of meds. It's sad when you have to carry 2 of these things. I also have a day's dose in my dop kit.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Weko

    Weko Loaded Pockets

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    I would increase your meds to at least 3 days worth as well as a tube of glucose tablets. you can also get a poncho made of mylar which is larger than the space blankets. Extra lighter, and a long sleeve flannel shirt. More food and water and a deck of cards. Also assuming you are already dressed for the weather. A multitool and a small stove with pot. Add a vehicle bag with extras and a sleeping bag. I keep a pool type air mattress in my kit as its cheap, disposable and keeps you off the ground. Even if you are indoors, concrete even carpeted gets cold.
     
  4. Mark9117

    Mark9117 Loaded Pockets

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    Those are not bad suggestions. I've deliberately avoided a "camping" scenario in favor of a much more limited application. I limited it to an overnight bag, not a Bug Out Bag, not a "Go" bag, nothing directed at a Stuff Hitting The Fan scenario. It's specifically aimed at making an overnight inconvenience a little more comfortable. Another assumption is that I will have access to my vehicle, if not actually confined to that vehicle. This gives me access to the Leatherman Rebar in the glove box, all of the goodies taking up space in my console and the aforementioned weapon.

    If it's going to be more than simply an overnighter, this bag is out of its depth. A stove? No, that's why I specifically went with an MRE with a flameless heater. I do anticipate being dressed for the weather and staying out of the weather. in the scenario I described above (The Great Boxing Day Blizzard of 2015) I wound up soaked to the waist just stepping out of my truck to try and get a bearing on where the road was and making futile efforts to get unstuck. Being cold is bad. Being cold and wet is thoroughly miserable. So, extra clothes and stay out of it.

    Investing in something to make sleeping a bit more comfortable might also be a good idea. But I'm thinking that a sleeping bag and air mattress (or sleeping mat, which I already have) under the back seat of my truck -- in addition to the lockboxes for my weapon(s), the big chunk of overnight bag and the not quite so massive first aid kit, and my folding entrenching tool, (nearly worthless) jack and tire tools -- is possibly a cubic foot too far.

    But this stuff is mostly seasonal. We have all 4 seasons here: hot as blazes, cool blowing sand, warm blowing sand, and winter. Winter lasts about 2 weeks. I don't know if it's global warming or what, but the past 2 years we've had one massive snow storm per year. I missed the bad weather this year because I just happen to be taking time off. We also have had one serious rain storm per year for the last several years. We get about 14 inches of rain a year and you don't want to be here the night that we get it (that's a joke). We are high desert. It's flat here and rain has no where to go. Consequently, flooding happens and roads get closed for hours if not all night. These are the occasions this bag is designed for. I suppose I could throw a sleeping bag and mattress/mat in the back seat in October and carry it around until April. That's an idea.

    And what you say about cheap and disposable is also a really important idea. There is nothing in this bag that I couldn't replace quickly and easily. I also think another thing I should consider is about $50 worth of cash in small bills. Vending machines and others can generally handle cash. As I look at this stuff, aside from the sleeping bag thing, I am well prepared for the overnighter scenario that I anticipate.

    I appreciate your looking at this and making suggestions Wako. Makes me wonder if I shouldn't consider altering the loadout for summer months, which I did not do this past summer.

    Still interested in hearing for others as well.
     
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  5. Tallboyjim

    Tallboyjim Loaded Pockets

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    I take a similar kit with me, not as in depth if I'm honest. My only question would be "why a pair of Levi's?" They won't pack down particularly small and once they're wet, they're going to stay wet. Cotton kills as they say. Oh and a sharpie.

    EDIT - and a few carrier bags. You don't need to be holed up in a confined place for very long before you are knee deep in wrappers etc etc.
     
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  6. ItsHardToKnow

    ItsHardToKnow Loaded Pockets

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    I have a similar bag in my car, a GHB of sorts
    And it is similar to yours
    That said, I'd some things if it were me,like do you really need 500' of paracord? I used to keep a bunch in my bag until I realized that if Im stuck somewhere for 12-24 hours the paracord wont do a whole lot for me, so I reduced it down to about 25', saving room in my bag.

    I'd probably add another MRE to it just to be safe
    And pick up a sillcock key, it could give you access to additional water if needed (get water purification tabs too)

    But I like what youve done here!
     
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  7. Mark9117

    Mark9117 Loaded Pockets

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    The carrier bags is a good idea. Will likely associate that with the truck.

    Meant to mention that I'll likely be wearing jeans, these jeans represent a fresh pair. The point is to stay inside and ride the storm out.
     
    #7 Mark9117, Feb 19, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2017
  8. Mark9117

    Mark9117 Loaded Pockets

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    Sillcock key. Check.
     
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  9. Adam Ng

    Adam Ng Loaded Pockets

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    Small gym bag in my car with: A change of clothes with micro fiber t-shirt, packable pants and short, long sleeve fleece sweat shirt, 2 pairs of socks and undies, toiletry kit with bottles of soap and shampoo from past stayed hotel room, battery operated OralB brush, razors, cologne, small first aid kit, sewing kit (also from hotel), 2 bottles of water, health bars. folding knife, small roll of duck tape, assorted zip ties, 50ft paracord, can opener and plastic forks, plastic cup, space blanket/ poncho. Out side of that I also have blanket, trenching tool, larger fix blade, 100ft of climbing rope, canned soups, portable propane heater ( double as stove) in a reusable shopping bag with zipper.

    Forgot to state 2 Micro fiber towels, bandanas, tooth paste and wet wipes in gym bag.
     
    Last edited by Adam Ng, Feb 19, 2017
    #9 Adam Ng, Feb 19, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2017
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  10. Adam Ng

    Adam Ng Loaded Pockets

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    To lock in the silliness!
     
  11. The Sixth Beatle

    The Sixth Beatle Loaded Pockets

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    I've got a duffel bag in the back of the motor and this reminds me I must get round to checking and updating it.
    My thought is what do I need if I'm stuck somewhere; If I cannot decamp to a hotel for the night (by far my preferred choice) I would head for the nearest telephone exchange where I would at least have warmth and shelter.
    I had two thoughts when putting it together, need and weight; I don't want to have to walk five miles carrying a load of gear I don't need, nor do I want to be left short.
    Inside it is :
    A change of clothes in one of those bags that you use a hoover to shrink.
    Bottle of water.
    500g bag of mixed nuts & raisins (last a long time and I like nuts).
    Brew kit - couple of tea bags, sugar sachets, UHT milk pods (no cooker though, these are in case I have the opportunity)
    basic toiletries - toothbrush/toothpaste, soap, shampoo (a lot of offices now have showers but, somewhat inconsiderately, don't supply smellies)
    A towel
    Leatherman
    Penknife
    Torch (& batteries)
    Paracord
    small FAK
    Disposable nitrile gloves
    lighter/matches
    tissues
    bag of coins for vending machines

    Looking at the OP's kit, I think I need to think about a space blanket or somesuch.

    Don't have, need or want a gun of any sort (ever if they were allowed here).
     
  12. Joe S

    Joe S Loaded Pockets

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    If you have blood sugar/blood pressure problems, if you take meds, have a dose with you. Glucose tablets, whatever you need. Make sure you rotate batteries and keep charged whatever you have to. (Just reread the first two posts: it's not a terrible idea to have 72hrs or even more worth of prescription meds. Just rotate every time you refill your script. Not only could there be disruptions to a pharmacy being open, it might be tough for a pharmacist to access your scripts.)

    I always like to have a little aspirin, ibuprofen, loperamide, cetirizine, etc. Aspirin is for heart attacks, one of the most likely lethal things you'll come across in any situation, ibuprofen lets you sleep if you've got a pounding headache/twisted ankle, the loperamide stops you up if you're in a situation where you can't baby your guts, the cetirizine is for allergies. They take up very little space and can make a big difference.
     
  13. mizedog

    mizedog Loaded Pockets

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    Subbed. Kudos to you for being prepared. Living in Colorado, I sometimes see all four seasons in one day. I've seen it go from sunny and 60s to single digits with sideways snow in a matter of hours. It can be so bad, that seeing the front of the car hood can be impossible. One time it took me over 2 hours to drive the 12 miles home. The snow from the north infiltrated the weather seals around the door, and blew in around the car speakers to accumulate at my feet. Last Spring, one storm stranded over 1,000 cars that day and I had to divert to my parent's house. I'm glad I had a bag like yours.

    We have friends that lost their house in the middle of the night to fire. Now they keep go bags ready.
    I had a plane crash into my house when I lived in Fullerton, CA. All I had was what was in my car. Almost everything else was lost to the fire/explosion.

    One of my challenges is handling the volume of clothes. I'm a BIG guy and clothes take a lot of space. Plus, carrying cold weather gear is needed during the winter. Comment on cotton: Have you considered replacing the jeans with something non-cotton?

    Thanks for posting.
     
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  14. Mark9117

    Mark9117 Loaded Pockets

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    K, I need some help here. I come from the dessert. It's dry here. What alternative to jeans are we talking about? I have ski pants. Would that be what we're talking about?

    Throw a brother a clue?

    Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
     
  15. Weko

    Weko Loaded Pockets

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    If you have a military surplus store in your area or thrift shop, they often get wool dress uniforms. The pants would be about the same bulk as your jeans, as others have stated cotton looses its protection once wet
     
  16. Mark9117

    Mark9117 Loaded Pockets

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    So, I'm looking for a heavy wool pair. That's helpful. There is no surplus store anywhere near here, but I do have Internet access.

    Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
     
  17. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    All good. But add to it: get a MedicAlert dog tag or bracelet. Grandfather of all the organizations that you see brochures for at the pharmacy. Provides (assuming you update your files) first responders etc with info on your meds, your conditions, etc. www.medicalert.org

    Don't leave home without this!

    Moshe ben David
     
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  18. Mark9117

    Mark9117 Loaded Pockets

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    Had a tag for a while now. Had to replace it when my doctor left his practice and I had to find a new one.

    New one even has my blood type. The tag, not the doctor.

    Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
     
    #18 Mark9117, Feb 20, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2017
  19. LivingUpNorth

    LivingUpNorth Loaded Pockets

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    I probably missed it in your list, but I always have a partial roll of toilet paper in my truck. It's been handy on more than one occasion, both going in the woods and also at a rest stop that didn't have any paper stocked.

    As far as a Levi's alternative, you could look (online) for a pair of poly/cotton or other poly blend surplus BDU pants. They don't have to be fancy, and if you don't dig the looks, just keep them in your vehicle bag for this one purpose.
     
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  20. mizedog

    mizedog Loaded Pockets

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    I lived 20 years in California (Orange County), and spent many, many nights in a tent in the desert; low, high, middle, and mountains. Some of my coldest feeling nights were in the desert. I've had, my breath snow down on my pillow, which had a cotton case on it. It was cold.

    Weko is right. The saying goes, "Cotton kills". This is because once it's wet, it holds the water (even vapor), and conducts heat away from you. That's why cotton is so good on a hot day.

    You don't have to spend much. I have a pair of synthetic undies, and some synthetic lined basketball pants that block wind. They were cheap at Walmart. If you stick to your car, you'll probably be fine if you have a sleeping bag over you. If your decide to walk to shelter, you need to get rid of the jeans.

    In the 80s, my family drove from Alabama where my Dad was stationed, to Northern Indiana. It happened to be during a killer winter storm. My Mom had just had surgery, and we were in a non winterized diesel car. North of Lafayette Indiana, the diesel froze and the engine quit. My dad and I walked 5 miles and 80 degree below zero weather with wind chill. I lost all the skin on my left ear and toes. 30 years later, I still don't have full feeling on my ears or my toes. So cold sucks.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
     
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