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Emergency kit foods- Shoebox pantry challenge

Discussion in 'Other Every Day Carry Items' started by madkins007, Nov 10, 2009.

  1. madkins007

    madkins007 Loaded Pockets

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    Lots of good ideas and discussion- enough that I think that 'foods and drinks/cooking' should be considered as a new category.

    As for the winner, I think TacticalChef was overall closest to my original plan and offered what looked like the most real foods available from the local store so congratulations!

    Thanks for playing!
     
  2. zuixro

    zuixro Loaded Pockets

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    I'm pretty sure I could live off of Top Ramen and beef jerky for a couple of days at least... :lolhammer: Beef jerky can be pretty pricey though. If you found some way to buy in bulk, it would be better.
     
  3. FRagman1967

    FRagman1967 Loaded Pockets

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    Ask any college kid if you can live off ramen, it can be done if you know who to improve it. Canned or fresh mushrooms, some green onion, kamaboko fishcake... (Yummms!)
    The jerky available these days has so many additives and salt that it would be unhealthy to use it as even a day-or-two food supply.
    There are awesome recipes for making your own jerky and pemmican (ground jerked meat, ground dried berries and rendered fat) that would be far cheaper and far more wholesome. Try googling some recipes....
     
  4. yam350

    yam350 Loaded Pockets

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    Jerky recipe for those without a dryer http://isurvivalskills.blogspot.com/2009/10/survival-skills-meat-preserving-jerky.html#more
     
  5. Urban Hermit

    Urban Hermit EDC Junkie!!!

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    We live in a great technological age. (a little sarcasm here) but really, food packaging these days is really efficient, and with the push for quick and easy, there are lots of options one can use for their Emergency kit. Power and granola bars are in abundance. There are also the cup o soup packs, ramen noodles, bouillon powder in small packets, lots of seasoning packets from companies like McCormick that will last for a couple years if need be. And now, you can buy spam, tuna, and other meats in Mylar single serving packs! Although I go for the new half can sized spam myself. It's a lightweight still, small and you get more than just one slice.

    Another little gem I found was in the Hispanic section of My local grocery. small 7 oz packages of elbow macaroni and other pastas for about .20-50 cents. These are the perfect size for a meal for two and give you lots of options. They're prepackages, but I would recommend maybe double bagging them in a ziplock to ensure freshness and keep the bag from breaking open in your kit. The product names i've found are Yemina and Moderna.
    I also did a little exploring in our local asian market and found what seemed like a hundred variations on the often bland ramen noodles. I've tried several and found them very tasty and quite cheap. Just in case you want a little variety. Ramen gives you chicken, beef and Asian. But I found Curry, teriyaki, mushroom, hot and spicey and alot of others.

    I also like to keep some of those single packs of kool-aide, gatorade and such in my bag. they take up little space and you can make just a little at a time when you want.
     
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  6. J4C3

    J4C3 Guest

    I'd help with uk too USA posting if required
     
  7. FRagman1967

    FRagman1967 Loaded Pockets

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    I recently found WWW.Bestglide.com, they have emergency ration packs that seem very well thought out. I like to have a prepackaged unit with me when I roam, and they make a great unit. It's called the Emergency Ration Pack.
     
  8. jegrundh

    jegrundh Loaded Pockets

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    being a college student i'll try and help you out. Limited budget and ease of cooking etc. along with limited space should be pretty easy to work around. As stated, a couple packets of ramen are a neccesary staple, yes they have salt but depending on what you are doing you might need that salt back! Spam is a good option for meat, i would suggest bringing along a camp pan and a small travel bottle of olive oil and frying them! definitely helps! Kinda gross but works in a pinch but powdered eggs also help, can throw in potatoes and veggies that you have lying around. Also would include a few spice containers, can find at a local camping store. Usually can hold multiple types of spice, would throw in: garlic powder, onion powder, basil, oregano, cajun seasoning and any other specific seasonings you like, this can often make a simple meal much better, and as always bring a little salt and pepper. Remember you need starch so noodles or instant rice works out really well and compliments any meal well. You can also throw in some kraft mac and cheese packets! Drink packets also really help, i usually have lemonade on hand. If you want to be cheap about it, buy in bulk and then spoon into "dime" bags. You can also use this as a seasoning if you really need too, aka ghetto lemon zest. peanut butter and whole wheat crackers also really help. You can also use pepperoni in there. throw in a few fruit cups, candy bars, granola bars, tea bags, "dime" bags of sugar, powdered creamer and you should be good to go. Can also add nutella, LOVE that stuff! I know that the skillet might be hard to get, but you can usually get a really lightweight camping one and it can turn a drawn out snack into a meal :) Also grab a couple of extra condiment packets next time you are in a gas station or fast food chain. Again, if you have access to a kitchen, grab veggies that will hold up well and a couple of apples. Here are a few recipies using really minimal stuff that will help make a meal but will require a few containers and a cutting board usually, but ingenuity can help with everything.

    (now that i think about it here are a few other things you can add that will expand your cooking horizons: Homeade jerky (can make a super sketchy soup with just it and water but works in a pinch), dehydrated milk, flour/corn meal, hikers chocolate (wrapped in wax), m&m's are awesome, just remember, pack nutritious but also multi-use)

    Tuna Salad! - canned tuna, elbow macaroni, celery, thinly sliced carrots, peas or other vegetables, some mayonaise packets, honey mustard packet and relish packet. Again try and find an amount of each that works for you!

    Super scrambled eggs - does require fresh veggies but they're pretty transportable and you can probably get them canned (but won't taste as good) - few russet potatoes, onions, peppers. Dice those all up thinly and saute in pan with oil until soft, then put in powdered eggs. When i make them i throw in cajun seasoning to spice them up, you could also cut up the spam and throw that in.

    Campfire Baked potato - wrap a baking potato in foil and put it in embers of fire. Add butter, etc. Forgot to add foil to list but i figure thats more like a part of cooking utensils.

    Rice and dogs - buy one of those terreyaki instant rice packets and cook that in one pot. Take vienna sausages and fry in the pan and then dice up and add to cooked rice. Can also substitute baked beans for rice and works just as well :)

    hors deurves (sp?) - simple simple simple, crackers, cheese, pepperoni. I know there are cheeses that are wrapped in wax that are ok for no refrigeration.

    Simple Soup - saute any vegetables in a pot, you can use any number of canned vegetables here! throw in water and boulion cubes along with spices (oregano and basil is a good combo), throw in a can of crushed tomatoes to make minestrone, add noodles and salt and pepper and you should be good. Optional is frying up small cubes of spam or vienna sausages. Can also add potatoes, rice, lentiles, etc.

    if you want more recipies (or if people want more) i can probably make one up for people and pass it around (and/or come up with some new ones?). But yeah, hope this helps and/or spurs some experimentation of your own! Remember, with a few basics and some ingenuity you can whip up some REALLY nice stuff.

    Stay frosty.
     
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  9. tool amour

    tool amour Loaded Pockets

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    This thread has really made my trips to the grocery store more fun! I wander around looking for emergency-kit foods. Today I even found small flat packets of baby food--made by a company called "Sprout". Baby food of any kind usually tastes bland and nasty, and I'd guess this stuff does too, but if you need to keep baby food on hand, it would be a lot handier than the little jars.

    I'm working on a car kit, and so far have a packet of dried bananas, apples, several foil packs of cooked rice, a couple foil packs of tuna, coffee, tea, sugar, cup & bowl, a jar of peanut butter, a few small cans of fruit, and a couple p-50s.

    I've also got a few cans of Sterno in the kit, but I've always heard that Sterno is a lame substitute for a real stove. I've been looking into the alcohol burning beer-can style stoves--anyone have any experience with this type of stove?
     
  10. Urban Hermit

    Urban Hermit EDC Junkie!!!

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    Every time I go to the store these days, I look for something to add to my EDC or BOB. Doesn't matter if it's grocery store, hardware store or local superstore. It doesn't have to be much, even if I just spend a couple bucks. But alot of times it's the search for new items that's the most fun.


     
  11. OhCanada

    OhCanada Loaded Pockets

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    This is not a EDC food kit but at work I have a shoebox size box in case the weather gets bad enough to make me have to spend the night or the bus stops due to the same weather and forces me to walk home in 2-3 hours.

    2 Mini-cans Fruit Cocktail
    2 Mini-cans Peaches
    2 packs of Peanut Butter Crackers
    2 packs of Cheese Crackers
    2 cans of Sardines
    2 cans of Herring
    2 bags of Cashews
    2 bags of Almonds
    2 bars of Bittersweet chocolate
    4 pre-wrapped Plastic Forks

    If the pop-top cans fail on any of the above cans I have a can opener on my multi-tool.

    I also have a 24-500ml bottles of water under the counter where I keep my food box. Individual bottles means I can carry what I need or share with co-workers.

    A tip if you want to store more food: Next time you are visiting the local village hooker ask her to save you the box next time she buys a pair of thigh high boots :p
     
  12. jegrundh

    jegrundh Loaded Pockets

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    wulfhermit.... looks like i am going to have a new hobby when i go shopping or am at any store! :highfive:
     
  13. Urban Hermit

    Urban Hermit EDC Junkie!!!

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    You'll be amazed how quick you can build up your kit, or add to your stores after just a short time. The trick is to keep a small notebook with a list of things you need. if you see something you need and the price is right at that time...get it and check it off the list.

    Tonight I went to the store for bread, lunch meat and one or two other items. I added a couple boxes of onion soup packets because they were on sale for .99 cents. alone they make a good warm soup broth, but also good for base for a heartier soup, and packed in Mylar coated pouches and will keep for a couple years. (always check the sell by dates.)
     
  14. tacticalchef

    tacticalchef Loaded Pockets

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    I carry an early version of an alcohol stove made by Mini Bull Designs in Maine. He makes ultralightweight, compact alcohol stoves. These work great and cook very hot. Right now he is working on a trail oven. I will be upgrading to this equipment as soon as it is released.

    Remember to use appropriate precautions carrying, storing, and/or using alcohol as a fuel source.

    TC
     
  15. Urban Hermit

    Urban Hermit EDC Junkie!!!

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    My one regret when setting up my BOB pantry is the cooking utensils. I have a light messkit that can be cooked in. But If I had to bug out and weight was an issue...I'd definitely miss my cast iron. Guess I'll have to hope for a bug out that includes a vehicle so I can at least bring along My small dutch oven and skillet.
     
  16. FRagman1967

    FRagman1967 Loaded Pockets

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    Ahh, man! there is nothing like cast iron for preparing food! I have about 9 sizes of skillets, lots of griddles and a fine no-legs dutch oven.
    I want a "legged" African Potjie dutch oven, though. I even bought one of those sandwhich irons that are two-part clamp together types, and it makes awesome camp jam buns and other such quick camp delectables.
     
  17. Urban Hermit

    Urban Hermit EDC Junkie!!!

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    Oh no doubt, cast iron is the way to go. People get impatient with it, or intimidated by using it. But once you get the hang of it, there's really nothing you can't cook in it.

    I have 3 skillet sizes, a 5qt legless dutch oven, two fajita plates, a small sqaure sandwich size griddle and a small sauce pot. Still a small collection but it's a start. next I think I'll get a meatloaf pan and a griddle pan. I asked for a cast iron griddle for Christmas this year....ended up with a Nordic ware griddle which is coated aluminum. Also wouldn't mind at least trying the lodge cast iron Hibachi grill.
     
  18. FRagman1967

    FRagman1967 Loaded Pockets

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    Oh Hibachis are the way to go! I need another one, my old one got jacked! A cast iron sauce pot? very nice.
    I will not cook with teflon coated pans. When they flake in yer food they can make you sick or give you cancer or soemthing.
    Try yard sales! I have found tons here in Tucson, but ya gotta look over used stuff VERY carefully to make sure nothing bad was used in/on them. I almost bought one until the guy told me he melted lead in it!
    I forgot to mention I also have a cast iron Wok! I scored that, and have loved it ever since.
     
  19. Urban Hermit

    Urban Hermit EDC Junkie!!!

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    Yeah...Teflon can be a problem. This will make folks laugh, but I actually used to sell cookware at a Farberware store outlet. Back then I still preferred cast iron, but as a second choice I'd push stainless steel. What most don't know is when you use Teflon, you shouldn't use non stick sprays or citrus based dish soaps, they break down the Teflon faster. If you need to use a nonstick spray of some kind, get a spritzer bottle and put regular cooking oil or olive oil in it and spritz the pan with that. It won't have the chemical propellants the sprays have and won't harm the coating. But best yet, use cast iron or stainless steel then you can use all the non stick sprays you want......of course for cast iron i'd still not use dish soap. lol.
     
  20. Urban Hermit

    Urban Hermit EDC Junkie!!!

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    I'd love to get a cast iron wok...they have them at a local restaurant supply store pretty cheap. But my stove is electric, not the best for Wok cooking.