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Emergency Information Apps

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by thegrouch314, Dec 23, 2017.

  1. thegrouch314

    thegrouch314 Loaded Pockets

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    Does anyone use an app to provide emergency information for paramedics etc?

    I have a lot of health problems and I take quite a lot of meds that interact with other drugs. I'm currently testing one out but it's not ideal.

    I'm hoping someone knows of an app that can be accessed from the lock screen without needing the password and has a way to contact ICE contacts, preferably free or cheap.
     
  2. dRo0G

    dRo0G Loaded Pockets

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    iOS has this feature out-of-the-box ;)
     
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  3. thegrouch314

    thegrouch314 Loaded Pockets

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    Alas I have an android, forgot to say that in my first post
     
  4. AlteredMentalStatus

    AlteredMentalStatus Loaded Pockets

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    What android OS are you you running? ICE is built into android N under "users".
     
  5. CBRNE

    CBRNE Loaded Pockets

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    As a former 12-year paramedic, do not get too caught up in those apps. I have never heard of a colleague anywhere in the US ever using one to get information. Honestly it is unnecessary 99.9% of the time, if you are unconscious or otherwise unable to give us the information we need, we will figure it out other ways in short order. We do not need to know you take cholesterol medication and that you have an allergy to strawberries.

    just my .02
     
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  6. Stuart Mantel

    Stuart Mantel Loaded Pockets

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    What about things like penicillin allergies? My wife has that and sulphur allergies as well. The EMT may not need it but the teams in the ER will.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
     
  7. thegrouch314

    thegrouch314 Loaded Pockets

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    The main reason I use apps like this is because I take some pretty strong painkillers and if the paramedics aren't aware, I risk an overdose. Is there a better way to make them aware then?
     
  8. McNasty

    McNasty Loaded Pockets

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    You would be much better off using one of the medical alert bracelets some come with an USB embebbed.
     
  9. CBRNE

    CBRNE Loaded Pockets

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    The likelihood of needing antibiotics that early in the game of being unconscious are pretty slim. I cannot speak for hospital systems and if they look for that sort of information, but again from an EMS perspective I certainly did/do not; if you are having an acute allergic reaction I do not care what it was to, I am going to fix it the same way. If I do not know what medications you are on, it honestly does not matter in the short term in most circumstances. As mentioned above being on "Strong pain killers", if I am in a position to that I need to give you pain medication in any circumstance (opioids), naloxone is readily available if I see you having an adverse reaction (decreased respiratory drive).

    I am not saying not to have the information in the app, but I am saying do not rely upon anyone looking at it. Again as mentioned above, bracelets are the best option. I HAVE read and treated patients accordingly based on them, although I if the patients did not have them (diabetics) it would have only taken seconds longer to figure it out; I am going to check your blood glucose level regardless.
     
  10. TransportJockey

    TransportJockey Loaded Pockets

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    We look at it at My service, but we also give abx in the field so allergies are nice to know

    Sent from my LG-LS993 using Tapatalk
     
    #10 TransportJockey, Dec 27, 2017
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2017
  11. nolaradio

    nolaradio Loaded Pockets

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    I wear a RoadID bracelet all the time. Don't know if a first responder would bother to call the number or pull up the website, but I fell better having that than relying on whatever is in my phone.
     
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  12. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

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    Honestly if you are in any state where you are unable to communicate you'd be better off with the first responders and doctors working on you instead of messing with your phone/usb drive stuff. The best place if any to have an allergic reaction is with a bunch of medical professionals standing over you, they actually do this for a living so you don't have to tell them what they should and shouldn't do.

    It doesn't hurt to keep track of medical stuff somewhere on your person but don't rely on it and don't trust that anyone else will.
     
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  13. Journo

    Journo Loaded Pockets

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    I have a set of dogtags which have my blood type on. I wouldn't expect any first responders to take those as gospel though they are more for identification after death. I don't trust the apps, while I always have my phone with me I cannot guarantee if something bad happens then someone else might not end up with my phone, or I with theirs...
     
  14. AlteredMentalStatus

    AlteredMentalStatus Loaded Pockets

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    EMT for 5 years. All I care for is your ICE contact. Usually allergic reactions, such as rash, closing airway, etc., a medical professional will treat that like any other sign.
     
  15. Outbound

    Outbound Loaded Pockets

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    EMR here. As with the EMT's above, I really don't care to or have time to look at your phone. I'll treat your signs and symptoms as they present themselves. The most useful thing, and the thing we're trained to look for, are medical ID bracelets, anklets, necklaces and tattoos during the primary survey. I'm not going go look at your phone if you're unresponsive.
     
  16. this_is_nascar

    this_is_nascar Loaded Pockets

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    Oh wow. I can't believe you just said that.

    Sent from my XT1635-01 using Tapatalk
     
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  17. Rob72

    Rob72 Loaded Pockets

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    Short-term: Unless you have a heart condition, and anaphylaxis to lidocaine, bi-carb, epinepherine, or a couple of other items, it really doesn't matter. Diabetics- wear the bracelet or tag, its what everyone looks for (including me, and I wear one myself).

    Once you're in the ED, people will be looking for other people to call. Here is where the app could come in handy. Allow your spouse/close friend/significant other/kids/etc., to have access, and they can read all that off to people asking. I don't know of any healthcare provider who gives a med list more than cursory consideration, without first-hand confirmation of its accuracy.

    Long term: If you're admitted in-patient, for more than 48 hours, and are unresponsive, most meds will be out of, or passing, in your system, and you'll be treated symptomatically. I.e., are you in an arrythmia? The ICU doc will prescribe.

    If you take psych meds, particularly the heavy metals, that may have withdrawal symptoms, a card from your prescriber, on your person, would be best.
     
  18. Jdjernigan

    Jdjernigan Loaded Pockets

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    I second RoadID and have one of their bracelets that I put on the band of my G-shock. I have the dog-tag version for each of my kids. I’m of the mindset that responders probably aren’t going to look at it but nothing ventured nothing gained. I have my medical issues listed on the band along with my ICE contacts. $20 isn’t going to kill me but it might help let my family know I’m dead.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  19. acropolis5

    acropolis5 Loaded Pockets

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    Medic Alert necklace( in my case) or bracelet. Old, tried & proven effective. Well known in the EMS/Police/Fire community, First Responders know what it looks like and to look for it. A not-for-profit emergency & medical information network. My necklace medallion has my name, blood type, important medical issues, drug allergy, ID number & an “800” number that can be called to supply more detailed information, insurance info & ICE contacts. Can be updated by phone or internet. It is especially useful if you go running, walking , hiking, or exercise away from home, without taking your wallet or other ID.