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Emergency Escape Hoods

Discussion in 'Other Every Day Carry Items' started by AnObfuscator, Aug 17, 2012.

  1. AnObfuscator

    AnObfuscator Loaded Pockets

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    So, I'm looking for an emergency escape hood for smoke/fire, something that I can fit easily into a large cargo pants pocket, backpack, purse (for the girlfriend), etc.

    Any recommendations on brands or types?

    Are there any tests that have been performed on some of these? I don't really care much about a warranty on a 1 use item essential for a life-or-death situation; if I need the warranty, I won't be able to file it... ;) So, tested functionality would be nice.
     
  2. ChopperCFI

    ChopperCFI Loaded Pockets

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    Since no one replied with first hand experience, I thought I would pass on some information from other sources I found when researching this a while back. I used to carry an EVACU8 smoke hood, but they were recalled and withdrawn from the market a few years ago. I have no experience with any of the following products.

    From an article in Aviation Consumer in 2005 or 2006 reviewing smoke hoods for pilots, they said:
    "
    CONCLUSION
    Each of the hoods we tested worked well once on—which one you choose depends on your facial features (beards, long hair and glasses are complicating factors) and how quickly you can don it. If glasses, a beard or long hair are a consideration, avoid the COGO and go with the Parat-C or the Safe Escape.

    Otherwise, we think the Parat-C is the best choice, if cost isn’t a factor for you. It’s easy to put on and kept the smoke at bay. But at $69.95, the Safe Escape hood is less than half the price of the Parat-C and thus represents the best value of the three, even given its donning foibles. The work- around for that is to train a little on quick donning and learn to set the straps correctly.

    "

    More recently, I have been reading the book Preparedness Now by Aton Edwards. The author has a whole chapter dedicated to Personal Protective Equipment which mentions several escape hoods depending on budget. It looks like a couple might fit your size requirements. Here are hoods this book recommends:
    Technon Breath of Life
    Essex Plus 15
    Elmridge iEvac
    Xcaper My Xcaper Kit
    Drager PARAT C
    Aussie ASE30
    Avon Protection NH15

    Here is what I could find on CDC NIOSH certification of escape respirators which lists some other brands.

    Again, I have absolutely no experience with any of these escape hoods, but hope this info might give you some place to start your search. Let us know what you decide.
     
    Dan2 likes this.
  3. paaiyan

    paaiyan Loaded Pockets

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    Part of me wants to say this might be a little overkill, but at the same time I realize I have a client with offices on the 19th floor of what passes for a skyscraper in Oklahoma. Were there ever a fire while I was up there it could get hairy. Hmm.
     
  4. randal

    randal Loaded Pockets

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    The smallest one that I know of is the KIMI chemical escape hood which is also rated for smoke and toxic gases. Here is the link: http://www.duramproducts.com/duram-shop/escape-hoods/duram-kimi It

    It is vaccum packed and easily fits in a cargo pocket. l have carried one for years on my EDC bag in an outside MOLLE pouch. I'm not sure if they are sold in the USA or not. I work in Egypt and got mine through their Europe vendoe.
     
  5. Halligan

    Halligan Loaded Pockets

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    I would have to ask what your mission would be. I can see a small plane pilot needing something to land his plane, but for most of us not so much. In the US non residential fire deaths range from 75 to 100 per year (contrasted with residential fires at 2500 to 2700 deaths per year). Fire survival strategies when out of the home primarily involve being aware of exits and being aware of what is going on around you. When checking into hotels I drop my bags and go find the exit stairs and then the other exit stairs. When in crowded venues I tend to stick to the outside walls and my antennae goes up whenever anything gets a little crazy (Station nightclub fire for instance). Pay attention to fire alarms, listen to building announcements and react. Fire gases are loaded with carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide and poisons like acrolein. I know some manufacturers are marketing a back up filter that snaps into our firefighter SCBA mask if we run out of air, I have never seen one in use. I have no idea how these bags over your head would hold up and to what standard they are tested to so I can't say for sure whether they are a gimmick or the real deal. I do know that from a haz mat perspective we would not wear filter respirators for IDLH concentrations of any of those materials.
     
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  6. AnObfuscator

    AnObfuscator Loaded Pockets

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    Wow. No attention for over a week, then a bounty of responses. :)

    ChopperCFI, randal, thanks for the suggestions. I'll take a look at those.
    paaiyan, it may be overkill, but the cost both in effort and money is relatively low.

    Halligan, I really appreciate your thoughtful reply. Am I correct in surmising that you are a firefighter? I think that your tactics are good examples of the general principles "maintain situational awareness" and "have a plan". I do similar things, too... in hotels, I always check my exits and study the evac plan; in crowded buildings like restaurants and theaters, I pay careful attention to exit locations and my exit pathways. It's a good habit for more than just fires, IMHO. Also, I recognize that a "smoke hood" is not going to give me the survivability of your SCBA gear... however, I'm looking to use a filter respirator not for going into IDLH situations, but for exiting. I don't expect 100% protection, just an increase in survivability.
     
  7. MTFire

    MTFire Loaded Pockets

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    I know the respirators used by the minng industry could possibly work. They have been tested over time and work. They are worn on a small pouch on the miners belts.

    I too have seen the emergency filters for SCBA advertised But never seen one in action and would be skeptical of them. I have been a paid firefighter for 35 years now and know that 'filtering' doesn't really work and only gives you a false sense of security. But don't get me wrong, in the right circumstances it would save your life but in the fire business it seems like you are never in the right circumstances.

    John
     
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  8. Halligan

    Halligan Loaded Pockets

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  9. AeroNautiCal

    AeroNautiCal Loaded Pockets

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    One of the potentially unexpected consequences of donning one's smoke hood may be that you'll have to fight off every other person that doesn't have their own...
     
  10. indigo_wolf

    indigo_wolf AKA Breezy

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    I looked at this and my first thought was that it was hard to consistently find what kind of heat ratings these things have and also whether they outgas in high heat conditions. :frantic:

    ATB,
    Sam
     
  11. acropolis5

    acropolis5 Loaded Pockets

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    We use the Xcaper mask. It's the smallest and lightest mask that I could find that filters CO. We team it up with large lens swim goggles for smoke and dust protection. The better model has a 5 yr. shelf life. I envision its use in evac of buildings, train tunnels, etc.
     
  12. subwoofer
    • GITD Manix 2XL Owner

    subwoofer Loaded Pockets

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    This thread has really interested me, and I've spent hours now looking for something suitable (and not vastly expensive) that I can buy in the UK. My favourite looking one if the MSA W65-2, but this is £420. OK, not a lot if your life is at risk, but for the average person this is a lot considering the expiry of around 5 Years.

    Any suggestions for options in the UK?
     
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