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EDC tips for motorbikes?

Discussion in 'General EDC Discussion' started by phaserrifle, Jun 5, 2010.

  1. phaserrifle

    phaserrifle Loaded Pockets

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    In a few weeks time (my basic training is this coming friday) I am going to be the proud rider of a 124CC moped/motorbike. having practically no knowledge of this form of transport, can anyone give me any tips on changes to my EDC that may need to be made?
    spesifically, I'm wondering:
    are there particular places to avoid putting stuff? for example I assume back pockets are a bad idea.
    are there any items, apart from the obvious (lisence, insurance docs, keys, helmet, lock ect) that I might need?
     
  2. fropstar

    fropstar Empty Pockets

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    I myself have recently passed my CBT (compulsory basic training) and brought a Yamaha YBR 125
    Get yourself a decent motorcycle jacket, mine is Gore-Tex with elbow and shoulder armour to protect you from any accidents and works great in the wet. Most motorcycle jackets come with loads of pockets; mine have four quite big ones on the front (big enough to put an Xbox game inside), a big one in the zip liner for a mobile phone, and two very big and deep pockets inside. This makes for great EDC potential.

    Don’t scrimp on safety it will save your life

    I never carry any documents with me, the worst that will happen is that a police officer will give you a 7 day wonder, and you will have to prove your documents and your local police station in seven days. Police can now check MOT, insurance and Road Tax just by looking at your registration number and if you have got your licence in the past few years it will be a photo licence that you can keep in your wallet.

    I also carry a rucksack with me when travelling with me to and from work, and I have that bungee tied to the rack on the back, just make sure straps are tucked in they can get caught in the wheel. You could try a top box, which you can get various sizes and colours, and put anything inside that. I will be getting one soon when I can afford one so I can my waterproof trousers in.

    Apart from that have fun
    And don’t forget the left lever is the clutch on a manual motorcycle not the back break; I do keep stalling my bike because of this.
     
  3. phaserrifle

    phaserrifle Loaded Pockets

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    same bike I'm currently looking at!
    I'm currently looking at some police surplus motorbike jackets (unused) that are available locally, as they are fairly cheap but should be decent quality, and then upgrading when I have the funds.

    Sounds like a sensible system. I was allways under the impression that you where supposed to keep documents with you. the licence wasn't just issued in the last few years, but in the last few days.

    The bungees certianly sound like a good idea. I could probably do something simmilar using my shoulder bag, and that has less straps to get in the way.

    the real fun starts trying to get the thing from here (central hampshire) down to uni in cornwall. unless we can find a van or trailer to take it, it could be a long ride :green:
     
  4. Flight-ER-Doc

    Flight-ER-Doc Loaded Pockets

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    A properly signed donor card.
     
  5. phaserrifle

    phaserrifle Loaded Pockets

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    that's going to have to wait till the end of the month. far as I know I can't become a registered organ donor untill I'm 18.
     
  6. vegassprky
    • GITD Manix 2XL Owner
    • In Omnia Paratus

    vegassprky Loaded Circuits

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    Buy the best helmet that you can afford, three people here in Las Vegas died because they were wearing "novelty" helmets! Protect your brain!!!
     
  7. phaserrifle

    phaserrifle Loaded Pockets

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    helmet has allready been bought, from a reputable motorbike shop, and produced by what is, as far as I can tell, a company with a reputation for making good quality mid-priced (£150 ish) helmets.
    advice from the bike shop was that honestly, anything much more expensive isn't really worth it on the kind of bike I'm riding.
     
  8. fropstar

    fropstar Empty Pockets

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    My helmet cost me £130, full face opening, great for filling up with petrol and shopping, don’t have to take the helmet off.

    By the way if you are interested in a YBR 125, I believe Yamaha are still doing 0% finance, this is what I have got, check with your nearest dealer.

    And I would say ride your bike down to Cornwall, but I remember how long a drive it is even in a car.
    I live just outside the M25 in surrey and used to work for Burger King, and had to do 10 weeks training in Ilminster which is about 10 miles away from Taunton.
    That drive in a car used to take forever and I could use motorways, no such luck on a 125.

    But I will be doing that drive again next weekend and further, I am taking my sister and nephew for a cheeky little week in Polperro.
     
  9. phill

    phill Loaded Pockets

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    You can rent a van for around £25 a day. Given you will want to cart some other gear its gotta be worth it.

    Ive always wanted to get a bike but never really had the cash for it. Perhaps later this year, early next...

    Whatever you do be safe when you ride and dont do anything dumb.

    Also thats a really nice looking bike. Exactly the kind i would go for if i ever get around to scraping up some cash for one, lol.
     
  10. robrit13

    robrit13 Loaded Pockets

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    Congrats on the bike. I have been riding my Aprilia 250 for at least three years now. I am a minimalist when carrying gear while riding, but I do keep a few things on me at all times. I like the idea of a durable jacket in case of accident, but I just couldn't spend the money on one. I use a Scottevest jacket with the pockets throughout. This allows me to keep my blackberry inside my chest, and my ipod on the other side. (i do sometimes listen to my ipod when I ride...my wife hates it, and it probably is stupid).

    I carry an Oakley Backpack with me when I ride for work papers, and my basic edc stuff. The key for me is keeping my knife with the clip on the shoulder strap. I like it there because I am exposed on the bike, and who knows when some idiot may want to jerk me around when I am sitting at a red light. My bike has a topcase too, and it works for shoes, hats and other stuff.

    Good luck and enjoy.
     
  11. phaserrifle

    phaserrifle Loaded Pockets

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    your helmet sounds a lot like my one.....are you me, from the future? :lolhammer:
    and yes, they are doing 0% finance, or free insurance (or atleast they are at my local yamaha dealer) but the bike itself and the insurance is going to be my 18th birthday present from my parents, I don't have to worry about that bit.

    I may end up using my pleather jacket, atleast at first. but upgrading (or getting some pads to put under/over it) is, I'm thinking, a priority as soon as I have the cash.

    the knife isn't a good idea for me. the police would be pulling me over as soon as they saw me, even if it was a legal model.
    the top box is certainly an interesting idea. the only reason I'm not so sure about them is that they look like a prime target for theives, who might attempt to bust it open for whatever is inside it.
     
  12. Wes_Siler

    Wes_Siler Loaded Pockets

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    Get a bungee net, they're cheap and you'll be able to strap all sorts of things to your pillion seat or tank. Think about putting a least a tank of fuel's worth of spare cash under your seat so you never have to worry about getting stranded if you lose your wallet ir whatever. Sticking some cable ties, duct tape, a few spare fuses and a couple other odds and ends under there as well. The tool kits that come with the bike tend to be rubbish, replace/add some decent tools and stick a small flashlight in there incase you break down at night.

    In terms of safety: avoid carrying disc locks or other metal items on your body, they can really hurt you in a crash. Being prepared for the weather is also a good idea. At a minimum, a balaclava and some glove liners will keep you functional if it suddenly gets cold.

    Just get out there and ride, you're young, learning is part of the fun. Also, read Hell For Leather :)
     
  13. H2O

    H2O Loaded Pockets

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    Up to date life insurance.
     
  14. Dr Jekell
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    Dr Jekell I had fun once, It was awful.
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    They are doing you a dis-service by telling you that.

    What brand, price, type of helmet you buy has almost nothing to do with what kind of bike you are riding.

    Helmets are designed for one thing only - Protecting your head from severe injury in an accident.
     
  15. yam350

    yam350 Loaded Pockets

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    +1 on the bungee net. As far as safety is concerned base your clothing on the fact that with normal denim jeans IIRC if you come of at thirty MPH you only have to slide 3ft to get down to bone. No such thing as a helmet that is too good!
    For luggage I always used to use the Oxford basic tail pack which has back pack straps that tuck away and attaches to the bike with bungees, mine doesn't get much use now but is about 10 years old and still in good nick, for weekend trips I just added the tank bag from the same line, you would be amazed at the amount of stuff you can get in the two together.
    In the '70s I used to go 90 miles to the Isle of Wight from London every weekend on a 200cc Durkopp scooter 60 MPH max, it was all I could afford (20 quid plus 25 quid insurance) but it that or not seeing my girlfriend.
    Enjoy your bike it will become a way of life.

    Get a Haines Manual and learn your bike then if you do have a breakdown you have at least half a chance if you have any kind of tools with you. Most Jap bikes need 8mm, 10mm,12mm, and 13mm spanners plus whatever the wheel nuts are for tightening the chain occasionally, 3,4,5,and 6mm Allen keys `plus phillip's screwdrivers no2.
    There are loads of compact tools around for you to put together a kit Screwdriver bit kits come in a decent handle with a long enough extension for most jobs, Witte is one make. Halfords do loads of tools including the combination bicycle tools which are useable. If you do go on a run take one of the emergency puncture repair aerosols it will save you a fortune on a recovery truck.
     
  16. Mr. Balaclava

    Mr. Balaclava Empty Pockets

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    A set of custom made earplugs, it's pretty expensive but well worth the money. At any speed above 60mph you will suffer hearing damage after only a few minutes, and the faster you go the more damage you suffer. I suppose with the kind of bike you're looking at it won't be that big of an issue, but if you do regular highway riding it's definitely a must.

    I would also suggest to buy a full set of protective gear, not only a jacket/helmet/golves, but also some pants and boots.

    Also make sure you are a member of some AAA kind of club, and keep the membership card with you along with a cellphone.