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EDC knife saves the day

Discussion in 'General EDC Discussion' started by ragr, Jul 21, 2009.

  1. Corbs

    Corbs Loaded Pockets

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    I have a life hammer in the car. Do you think, if I extend the philips driver (where there is often a corkscrew), palm the handle and poke the philips through the knuckles it could work?
     
  2. parawolfe

    parawolfe Empty Pockets

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    It would be too bulky to carry on your person or at least in your pockets but the SAK Rescue Knife would have definitely come in handy in that situation.

    Parawolfe
     
  3. Crash_Fistfight

    Crash_Fistfight Loaded Pockets

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    No, that hammer will most likely break causing you more damage then the window ( we tried a "life hammer" while drilling with the Hurst tool and found the so called life hammer shoddy and prone to breaking
    with the first smack) I would advise against that particular item.

    your best bet might be some sort of moderately weighted w/ a dull point on one end steel rod maybe 12" or so to give you some weight behind your strike.

    I don't know where something like that could be found, just a thought.
     
  4. Rich

    Rich Loaded Pockets

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    You might check the trunk of your vehicle by the jack and the spare tire... ;D

    Some tire irons actually have a superb pry-bar built in to one end too!
     
  5. Crash_Fistfight

    Crash_Fistfight Loaded Pockets

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    are we talking after an accident you are involved in requiring self extraction or an accident you happen across out on the interstate?

    if you need to get yourself out of a jam, the trunk and that tire iron are most likely out of reach. ;D

    on the other hand, a tire iron is a pretty good tool to break glass as well as a limited pry bar.
     
  6. fishwolf

    fishwolf Loaded Pockets

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    Thats funny, Im NOT a firefighter or a EMT and I have smashed many windows in junk yards with lifehammers, and have used a knife point to crack a window to the point that it could be knocked the rest of the way out. It was pretty easy too. :shrug:
     
  7. Mister Scribble

    Mister Scribble Loaded Pockets

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    "A Prudent Man Foresees the Difficulties Ahead and Prepares
    For Them; a Simpleton Goes Blindly On and Suffers the Consequences."

    -- Proverbs 22:3

    I wish I always remembered to live like that. It's the intelligent approach to life.

    I really admire people who have it all together.
     
  8. Rich

    Rich Loaded Pockets

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    Truthfully, I hadn't considered self-rescue :brickwall:

    I would be okay in the Tacoma because the tire iron and jack are in the cab behind the passenger's seat (with a full-size spare under the bed). With one or both of my legs out of service from a crash I'd be in deep trouble in anything else that ended up ON ITS SIDE like the SUV in the original post... *doh*


    I think that there's an important distinction to be made here between tempered glass vehicle windows and laminate glass vehicle windshields a.k.a. windscreens. The two types of material are VERY different. If a vehicle is upright then by all means break out the tempered glass windows. You can do this with a decent knife point, big screwdriver, collapsible baton, big flashlight, fire extinguisher or even a nice rock. It's a great approach and much safer than going at the windshield.

    The video phill posted doesn't really do most of the windshields I see justice. This is probably the Victorinox marketing team doing their job, and I don't blame them, that Swiss rescue tool won big awards fair and square, it is a great LITTLE tool.

    The windshield in the original post at the start of this thread has already been "softened" by the crash which is often not the case. But as a few folks have now mentioned, it still took some effort to get through. I think it's also worth mentioning that nobody cracks open a barley-pop at the end of that video.

    No gimmick I've seen is going to be perfect for removing every windshield, and most windshields can be left alone and sent to the junkyard. That said, the tools generally I prefer for a "professional" windshield removal are the pickhead (fireman's) axe and Glas-Master.

    If I could pick one and only one civilian tool to remove a windshield it would be a conventional axe or hatchet. I haven't used a lifehammer so I really can't comment on its effectiveness but based on it's 8 inch size alone I can't imagine it being particularly effective on a windshield so I'd really rather have a long fat piece of rebar or my trusty tire-iron in a pinch.
     
  9. Corbs

    Corbs Loaded Pockets

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    Something that I've heard is great for putting in a window, is an 'automatic centre punch'
     
  10. fishwolf

    fishwolf Loaded Pockets

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    The size and weight of the tool is not the only deciding factor on glass breaking. Life hammers and punches work because of the amount of force put into a 1/8 of an inch POINTED surface.

    Its the same as using you front 2 knuckles as a striking surface and it hurts more than a full fist punch.
     
  11. phill

    phill Loaded Pockets

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    As Rich said (and assuming Crash means the same) they are referring to windscreens/windshields. Side windows are easy to put through, you can just punch through if its really that desperate and there is no other option (you will screw up your hand of course).

    So those auto centre punches, a screwdriver and even ninja rocks (see wikipedia) make getting into side windows a doddle, but with a windscreen your never getting through with one due to the way the glass is made.

    Its the same glass (more or less) windows are made of in high rise buildings. Not long after 9/11 there was some nutter kid who decided to fly a Cessna he was learning to fly into a skyscraper at full speed. The plane bounced off the glass and he died when it hit he ground. Its hard stuff.
     
  12. Rich

    Rich Loaded Pockets

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    Not on LAMINATE.


    In fairness to you, the vehicles you see in the junkyard are probably older vehicles. As safety requirements have increased for vehicle manufacturers, so has difficulty of extrication for rescue personnel. On the bright side more and more of these victims are alive when we get them out.

    I have seen a set of decent hydraulic cutters break on a hardened Volvo B-post. Talk about loosing the tool you need when you need it most.
     
  13. fishwolf

    fishwolf Loaded Pockets

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    Ok but then why on a 2001 with safety laminated glass can my 4 year old son throw a quarter sized rock at the windshield, and crack it the entire length side to side and 8 inches up and down. Tell me I couldn't do the same or better with a life hammer. Then bust it the rest of the way. I love a lengthy discussion don't you? :)
     
  14. vivek16

    vivek16 Loaded Pockets

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    Fishwolf: I haven't tried it myself but from what I gather, laminate glass may crack but because of the thick vinyl layer in the middle, the glass is harder to take apart (even with a life hammer because you have to rip the vinyl layer). I don't know how hard it is to remove but it seems that there are merits to both sides of the argument.

    -vivek
     
  15. Rich

    Rich Loaded Pockets

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    Yeah, I had cracks in the windshield of my very first car from following a truck on the highway too closely. But the rocks didn't come through my windshield and I drove that way for a couple of years, even through rain and hail.

    Herein lies the crux of our issue. This is what you've gotta try in the junkyard or on the street to understand.

    It's the laminate sandwich that's such a pain-in-the-glass.

    I'm not saying it couldn't be done... eventually. I'll strap on my boots and get rid of it Pineapple Express style (watch the trailer all the way to the end). It just might take me a while.
     
  16. hovaczech

    hovaczech Loaded Pockets

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    Maybe part of the issue with removing the front windshield, is that the glass is tempered, as well as laminated. It's design to break into small pieces. While you succeed in easily breaking it (with a rock or rescue tool) due to the small fractures it manages, with the help of the lamination, to maintain alot of its original form and rigidity. Just my .02.
     
  17. Crash_Fistfight

    Crash_Fistfight Loaded Pockets

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    one word: Glass Master. ;D

    or ya could use a hay hook and sledge hammer, irons, spring loaded punch, pick head axe, brush hook and sledge hammer all work well on any car window.

    although most folks don't carry any of the above on a regular basis except maybe the punch ( which is really the best, I had an OGM and it slipped my mind)
     
  18. jzmtl

    jzmtl Loaded Pockets

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    I don't know about you guys but I keep either a crow bar or a 2lb hatchet right between driver's seat and door. I'd imagine either can go through laminated windsheild relatively fast. Never had to use it yet, and hope I don't have to, at least for on myself.