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EDC Knife As Eating Utensil?

Discussion in 'Knives' started by Dafabricata, May 2, 2011.

  1. drgnclwk

    drgnclwk Loaded Pockets

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    I avoid using my edc at restaurants since people are easily scared here in southern california. I've only used an edc folder once in public to slice a tough piece of beef in public since the dining commons only have dull butter knives. I will use my edc for some food prep occasionally or when bbqing with friends.
     
  2. flarp

    flarp Loaded Pockets

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    I've always been hesitant on using my EDC on food. I use my knife to cut various things I would never consider eating (eg. opening caulk or glue bottles, bags of lawn fertilizer or insect poisons), and I often use WD40 to clean off adhesive gunk from opening packages. A number of things I cut with my EDC knife and the WD40 I use for cleaning are all quite poisonous. Even the 3-in-1 oil I use sometimes for cleaning and oiling up the blade to prevent corrosion are not really food-service grade.

    Do you use a separate knife for food than for your other tasks? If not, how do you clean your knife such that you'd feel safe eating with it after using it to open a bag of lawn fertilizer w/ weed and insect killer?

    One of the keys to keeping kitchen knives in good shape is to clean them ASAP after cutting food. How do you properly clean your EDC knife after eating if your next destination isn't home (or somewhere where you can give it a proper cleaning)? Just a quick wipe down?
     
  3. Kueh

    Kueh Loaded Pockets

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    I have used my EDC knife for similar purposes, (eg. opening caulk or glue bottles, bags of lawn fertilizer or insect poisons). I wipe my blade "clean" after the work is done.

    Cleaning the blade is not an issue. I just go to the washroom of where I go and wash my knife with soap and water and gentle rubbing. I generally wipe my blade "clean" at the table before putting it back.

    I don't use any lubricants for my knives, blades or joints. I remove adhesive gunk with a little vegetable oil and paper towel. If it's really bad, I use a citrus based solvent (which cleans up with water).

    I generally touch-up my knife blade edges when I get home or the next day.

    Besides, I usually have a second (or third or .....) knife with me.
     
  4. gremlin078

    gremlin078 Loaded Pockets

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    A.G. Russell carries several folding steak/food knives for just the purpose discussed. I just usually use my EDC, although after reading through this thread, I'm going to start cleaning the blade with alcohol rather than some of the things I've been using such as 3in1..
     
  5. autopoint

    autopoint Loaded Pockets

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    I dedicate an Opinel to food tasks away from home, but I don't carry it daily. I'll grab it on the way out when I know I'll attend a steak dinner or bbq/cookout. It's a stainless steel blade rather than carbon, so I'm less prone to be reminded of my last meal each time I use it. I know a carbon blade can be maintained (food-)safely with mineral oil, but stainless tilts the equation that much more in my favor.
     
  6. flarp

    flarp Loaded Pockets

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    Just ordered an Opinel No. 6 for this exact purpose. Got the carbon one though (never used a carbon steel knife, so kinda curious). It's not especially large or intimidating, and at quick glance, it's not likely to draw unusual attention. I don't really want to carry two knives, so this will likely live in my glove compartment. I figure if I'm eating out, there's a fair chance I'll be using my car to get there...
     
  7. Wcben

    Wcben Loaded Pockets

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    My wife hates it when I do this! We do a number of "public" cook-outs and I'm usually quite discrete. The thing is I know exactly what my knife has been doing and, I refuse to use a POS plastic knife on a steak, if forgo other reason than just out of respect for the cow!!

    I do have to say that many of the guests at our wedding gasped when I pulled out my PJ Tomes Tie Chee Bowie to cut the wedding cake...the wife did ok that before I did it! The cutting can be seen below...Not sure if it's ok to post this link, if not, mods, please remove it: http://usualsuspect.net/forums/showthread.php?t=119557
     
  8. Dferg10

    Dferg10 Loaded Pockets

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    I recently used my edc Spyderco Delica to cut up watermellons for my son's paintball team at a tournament in Lakeland Florida.
     
  9. brix

    brix Loaded Pockets

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    +1 on the Opinel. It's a cheap and great design for basic food purposes. Non-threatening and a little classy to say the least. I bring mine when I know I will be eating food along with my AK Ti Apocalyspork
     
  10. Kueh

    Kueh Loaded Pockets

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    An Opinel knife with a stainless blade is a good choice. Just take the knife apart and oil the blade groove so it resists any food oils/juices.
     
  11. davek14

    davek14 Loaded Pockets

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    knork (fife?)

    I use my pocket knife as a fork every day at work. I have fruit in a little bowl in my lunch and, as my hands are dirty, I wipe my knife with a napkin and use it to eat the fruit pieces. (I use the sandwich's baggie to avoid hand contact with it)

    Feels very "medieval" to eat with a knife.