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EDC for Fire/EMS/LE

Discussion in 'General EDC Discussion' started by samson722, May 4, 2006.

  1. samson722

    samson722 Empty Pockets

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    HELP! I'm looking for tools and any goodies to make my job easier. I figure just by the nature of the forum, there's got to be some fellow FFs, EMTs or LEOs on here who have loads of useful EDC tips for me. I've been on the job a modest 2 years, and there I things I don't leave the house without, like shears, gloves, folder, etc...the usual. What else can you guys/gals come up with? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

    722
     
  2. widgnwhacker

    widgnwhacker Empty Pockets

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    Surefire G2 :agree:
     
  3. Glock19

    Glock19 Loaded Pockets

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    Are you talking about stuff to keep in your turn-out gear? I would advise NOT to carry a bunch EDC stuff on your regular clothes. When you're wearing your turn-out gear you will not be able to get to it at all.

    I carried a few items in my gear when I was a FF
    -small vise-grips (throw these on a garage door track after it's up to prevent it from coming down after you enter)
    -wooden door stops (obviously to keep doors from closing behind you during searches)
    -folding spanner wrench(there's almost always one in the hydrant box. Almost always.)
    -leatherman (didn't get used much, too small and weak of a tool for most fire scenes, skip it.)
    -Maglight (4 C cell, I'd use a newer smaller light today)
    -"Truckman's" belt (used to carry tools from the trucks)
    -webbing (never actually used this but could have come in handy in an emergecy. Probably replace this with 50-100ft of paracord nowadays)


    The only thing I would add that I never actually carried would be a fixed blade knife that could be reached by either hand without having to dig into a pocket. It's easy to get tangled on stuff in a housefire, a quick way to cut your way free could be life saving.
     
  4. samson722

    samson722 Empty Pockets

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    I've got the whole turnout situation straightened out...I'm talking about on-duty w/EMS. Which is most of what I do. We don't get a lot of fires. We're a small town of 6,000, but with all the industrial and commercial buildings in town, we've got a daytime population of about 25,000. So, EMS is considerably busier than fire. Thanks for the input though, I never really thought about carrying a folding spanner...good idea.

    722
     
  5. iNDiGLo

    iNDiGLo Loaded Pockets

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    For an EMT/Emergency Personell i would consider carrying the Kershaw Blur Rescue folder. It is a combo blade and has a point on the end to shatter glass should you need to get someone out of a vehicle. It also has a dull tip so you won't accidentally cut someone while in a rescue situation. Nice folder for your application.

    I'd also carry a nice LED flashlight like a Surefire L2, L4, or U2 Ultra. They can take abuse and if you drop it you won't blow the bulb. Another really good consideration would be the Streamlight ProPolymer 4AA Luxeon.

    O0
     
  6. 1331

    1331 Empty Pockets

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    As a LEO I carried a leatherman in my vest side straps. Assisting EMS I once used it to dismantle a pizza dough roller machine where a girl got her hand stuck in the rollers while cleaning with a rag. A long prybar was used to hold pressure on the rollers while removing the adjustment mechanism (removed cotter pin and nut). The EMS didn't have a wrench or any other tools. BTW, girl just had swelling, nothing broken or mashed.
     
  7. charlie fox

    charlie fox Loaded Pockets

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    In my uniform pockets I usually carry a SAK of some sort and a larger folder, a Mini Maglite (hey, bulbs and batteries are free), a pair of EMS shears and earplugs.

    In my bunkers I carry a medium size pair of vise grips, a small screw driver with interchangable tips, a utlity knife, a Super Sabre Light, two hose straps and a caribiner and a spanner wrench.
     
  8. greenLED

    greenLED Empty Pockets

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    How'd you guys carry gloves? I've been packing a pair in an empty film canister for years, but now I need something slimmer. I've seen some of those cordura pouches, but I'm curious to see if there are other solutions out there.
     
  9. samson722

    samson722 Empty Pockets

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    Yeah, Pinky, there's tons of ways to EDC gloves. Well, when I'm working, all my pants have glove pockets, but other options are available. One of the coolest are these TacMed Packs from County Comm, that hold some simple FA items, and a pair of nitrile gloves. Alot of medics just shove them in their back pocket or use a pouch. The 5.11 pants and the County Comm Diplomats have dedicated dual glove pockets which are nice and slim. There are some sources out there for flat-packed single pair packages, lemme see if I can dig one up. I hope some of these methods work for you, there are tons of different ways, if i think of anything else, i'll just edit the post.

    Cheers!

    Samson
     
  10. greenLED

    greenLED Empty Pockets

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    slim= better in my particular circumstance. Thanks, sam!
     
  11. samson722

    samson722 Empty Pockets

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    What're the gloves for in your case? For CPR? Just in case? That would narrow down the carry options a little bit. Thanks.

    Samson
     
  12. greenLED

    greenLED Empty Pockets

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    Just in case; it's been years since my last certification course, but carrying the gloves stuck. I've actually had to use them a couple of times to take care of bleeding wounds.
     
  13. samson722

    samson722 Empty Pockets

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    OK, and good on ya for taking the initiative, I'd admire that in a non-EMSer. Hmm...that said, I was originally going to recommend one of those faceshield, glove pouch keychain combos that most people get when they use gloves for CPR, but if it's really just for a barrier, I would recommend the TacPac's from County Comm, they fit in my back pocket, and have most of the stuff I'd want if I were to treat somebody outside of an ambulance w/o my jump bag. I tried looking for sites with individual flat-packed nitrile gloves, but to no avail. Which, btw is all anyone should use in the field...NITRILE! Sorry, I hate to use CAPS, but there have been too many instances of well meaning bystanders using latex gloves while assisting and causing the patient to go into anaphylactic shock from a severe latex allergy. If you want to keep this super small, I would suggest tightly rolling the gloves up inside some sort of small container. If we're talking just one pair, they'd fit inside most medium to large key fobs. But I never recommend carrying just one pair of gloves, because when it rains it pours, and not changing gloves in the heat of the moment can result in some nasty contamination. One of the slimmest configurations I've seen is carrying like 3-4 pairs flat inside a handcuff case. It slim, well built and won't fall apart like most of the cordura pouches out there. If you come up with anything really brilliant, please, I'd like to know, as the thought of not being able to come up with anything else at the moment is really vexing me.

    Cheers!

    Samson
     
  14. greenLED

    greenLED Empty Pockets

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    Froogle is my friend (or my wallet's fiend, depending on how you look at it):

    These are the "regular" pouches I've seen floating around, which combine a CPR mask and gloves:

    http://www.myshopkart.net/academysafetysupplie/product_info.php?cPath=14685&products_id=38262

    http://www.fox-intl.com/searchresult.asp?id=1450


    Personally, I think those pouches are cheaply made, but that's just me always looking for stuff that'll last a lifetime. Anyway, here's one that looks better built:
    http://www.buyemp.com/product/1021906.html


    and this one is for gloves only:
    http://www.patriotoutfitters.com/scripts/pr.exe/sbproc?action=showproduct&productid=1570&path=froogle

    It fits 6 pairs. A bit larger than what I was looking for, and it doesn't look as sturdier as the previous one, but that's *exactly* the design I had in mind.

    While typing this it struck me that the same Advantix film canisters that I use to store spare 123's will fit a pair of gloves, and they're a bit slimmer than the round film canisters I've been using.


    Slightly OT: I think recertification is long overdue for me. The weird thing is, back when I was "in the loop" I was constantly bumping into situations where my first aid skills were needed. Fortunately, I haven't had to jump out and handle a crisis in a while.
    [me=greenLED]knocks on wood[/me]
     
  15. samson722

    samson722 Empty Pockets

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    EMP's service is pretty good, and their prices even better. Boundtree Medical is the best service wise, we use them for absolutely everything at my station. Those MDI pouches are pretty :censored: solid. If you don't mind the belt pouch concept, go with the CO-25 from RipOffs, that is if you can still find it anywhere (out of business). Those are what I used to have and are absolutely bomb-proof. If not, Uncle Mike's makes some :censored: tough cordura stuff and they're pretty good about replacement if you kill it. On the subject of recert, I think it's worth the cost. If I do say so myself, American Heart is the way to go, and everyone at this point, should take the BLS course which includes Adult/Infant/Child CPR, AED, and Conscious Choking Curriculum. This is increasingly true with the prevalence of public-access defibrillators. I'm required to have my CPR for the Professional Rescuer, which just means it's more expensive, but it's invaluable. A lot of things have changed dramatically. The new compression ratio is like 30:1, and provided you have 2 rescuers, no stopping for ventilation, etc. It's the best money anybody could spend. I've not had to use that knowledge outside of work, and I'm thankful for that, but even more thankful for the fact that I do have that knowledge and the guts to use it. Sorry to rant so much, but what can I say? I'm passionate about EMS and teaching. Let me know what you decide and glad I could help.

    Samson
     
  16. L Bow

    L Bow Loaded Pockets

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    Off topic but important:
    30:1 compression ratio?
     
  17. samson722

    samson722 Empty Pockets

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    Sorry, nasty typo. 30:2 Compression ratio. Meaning, 30 Compressions to every 2 ventilations if performing CPR on an adult wiith 1 rescuer present and no advanced airway in place. <a href="http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/112/24_suppl/IV-19">American Heart Association 2005 Guidlines for CPR and ECC</a> That said, I am an EMT, so when in a situation where a patient has coded in the back my truck and I have another EMT at my disposal, the compressions are to be delivered at a rate of ~100 per minute with NO pauses for ventilations, which are to be delivered every 8-10 seconds by the second rescuer. If this is confusing, you could try reading the AHA guidlines, but those are very convoluded. I'm not an AHA instructor, but I've been an EMT for a while, as well as a Teaching Assistant for EMT-Basic classes, and as such, I try to stay up on the most current guidlines possible. I apologize for the confusion over my typo. AHA isn't really sure what they want us to be doing in terms of the new guidlines. There's even a lot of ambiguity in their own instruction. PM me and I can explain a lot better. Thanks so much for bringing that to my attention, though. Now I feel better since it is corrected.

    Cheers!

    Samson
     
  18. samson722

    samson722 Empty Pockets

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  19. dinoadventures

    dinoadventures Empty Pockets

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    30:1? Sounds like a diesel engine...
     
  20. samson722

    samson722 Empty Pockets

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    yeah....AHA is paranoid about not getting enough effective compressions in for CPR, so they decided to up the ante and make each round 30 compressions to 2 ventilations....makes me real tired.. :(

    i wonder if we could get a diesel engine powered machine to do CPR for us??? :lolhammer:

    Samson