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Earthquake preparedness

Discussion in 'The Breakroom' started by microbe, Jan 25, 2016.

  1. microbe

    microbe EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    I got woken up this morning at 5.25 am, by slamming window shutters, which is normal in heavy wind, Still half sleeping I realized heavy wind could not be responsible for slamming wardrobe doors, a shaking bed, and the rattling of pots and glasses in the kitchen. Earthquake! My wife had woken up to, and held on to me in a fright. We never experienced an earthquake like this before. It was bloody scary. The whole building was shaking. Heck everything was shaking. A 6.4 magnitude quake had hit the Mediterranean Alboran Sea, at 140 Km from the coast where I live, and the temblors where felt all over the Costa del Sol. Besides being shocked, thank god no real damage happened, but it made me rethink the gear I have close at hand for cases like this.
    I got my cell phone, a flashlight and a large folder, on my nightstand, and a fixed blade in the drawer.
    However, if the building, or pieces of the building where to have come down while we where still in bed, I would not have had any heavy duty tools to leverage concrete if needed. I would probably not be able to get to the garage storage for a crowbar. I suppose my cell phone would be my best tool for getting help from emergency services.
    Hence my question: Do any of you live in earthquake prone areas, and what would you advise I need to have withing reach just in case? Maybe an axe? Maybe a FAK more close by? A whistle for getting attention? Let's hope I will never need it, but ALL advice is welcome.
     
  2. JHGM

    JHGM Dinosaur Supervisor

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    Glad you're ok microbe...

    Supposedly I live very near one of the fault areas (New Madrid) that is long overdue for a Big One...

    Last one that was major was bad enough that it made the Mississippi River run backwards in the early 1800's...

    They used to harp on earthquake preparedness like crazy when I was in grade school but I don't hear much about it anymore.

    In any case this is a great topic and something that I will think on as well...

    Do yourself a favor and Google "triangle of life" when you get a chance...

    I remember my Dad talking about this a lot and it made sense to me as well.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. microbe

    microbe EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Video from this morning, on the other side of the Med. Very similar like what happened in my bedroom.
     
    Last edited by microbe, Jan 25, 2016
  4. microbe

    microbe EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Thanks, and thanks for the tip Jarhead,I will look into that.
     
  5. JHGM

    JHGM Dinosaur Supervisor

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    Huh...

    Got curious, because it's been years since I've even heard the term, and did some research on "the triangle of life"...

    Turns out it's now considered rather controversial and not recommended by the "experts".

    I think that in my particular case it is rather relevant though considering the layout of my bedrooms (and my kids) and the construction of my house...

    Guess it's just one thing to consider in your preparations and may or may not be helpful info.

    [​IMG]
     
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  6. smokingfish

    smokingfish Loaded Pockets

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    Earthquakes makes me nervous, not from the event itself, but my 120 gallon aquarium that sits at the foot of my bed...

    Being in ca, we are majorly overdue for the big one.

    I have supplies in my car and bedroom, as well as 2 bug out bags.

    Main thing I'm focused on is water, i can go weeks without food apparently (I fast here and there).
     
  7. microbe

    microbe EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    I had a look myself, and even if there are pro's and cons to it, the concept does make sense to me. Most useful info was that modern steel and concrete buildings do not display the pancake effect as seen in older and poor constructed buildings. I hope the fracture lines stress is released now, and it stays quiet.
     
  8. microbe

    microbe EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Interesting global earth quake map:
    quakes.globalincidentmap
    A lot of action in the Straight of Gibraltar going on today
     
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  9. Cobra 6 Actual

    Cobra 6 Actual Loaded Pockets

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    Also, glad to hear that you and your family are safe! For water supply check out the WaterBOB bladder: it sits in your tub and holds 100 gallons. The US cost is about $20. Also, here's a list of disaster supplies I pulled off the Internet and 'wordsmithed' a bit:

    Top things that Disappear in a disaster (get them now)

    1. Generators
    2. Water Filters/Purifiers
    3. Portable Toilets
    4. Seasoned Firewood.
    5. Lamp Oil, Wicks, Lamps, Lanterns
    6. Camp Stove Fuel – Impossible to stockpile too much.
    7. Guns, Ammunition, Pepper Spray, Knives, Clubs, Bats & Slingshots.
    8. Hand (non-electric) can openers, & hand egg beaters, whisks.
    9. Honey/Syrups/white, brown sugar
    10. Rice – Beans – Wheat
    11. Vegetable Oil (for cooking) Without it food burns/must be boiled.
    12. Charcoal, Lighter Fluid
    13. Water Containers
    14. Mini Heater head (Without this item, propane won’t heat a room.)
    15. Grain Grinder (Non-electric)
    16. Propane Cylinders (Urgent: Definite shortages will occur.)
    17. Survival Guide Book.
    18. Lantern Mantles
    19. Baby Supplies: Diapers/formula. ointments/aspirin, etc.
    20. Washboards, Mop Bucket w/wringer (for Laundry)
    21. Propane Cookstoves
    22. Vitamins
    23. Propane Cylinder Handle-Holder
    24. Feminine Hygiene/Haircare/Skin products.
    25. Thermal underwear / Polypropylene
    26. Bow saws, axes and hatchets, Wedges (also, honing oil)
    27. Aluminum Foil Reg. & Heavy Duty
    28. Gasoline Containers (Plastic & Metal) with fuel (do not store in house)
    29. Garbage Bags, many
    30. Toilet Paper, Kleenex, Paper Towels
    31. Milk – Powdered & Condensed
    32. Garden Seeds (Non-Hybrid)
    33. Clothes pins/line/hangers
    34. Coleman’s Pump Repair Kit
    35. Tuna Fish (in oil)
    36. Fire Extinguishers (or..large box of Baking Soda in every room)
    37. First aid kits
    38. Batteries
    39. Garlic, spices & vinegar, baking supplies
    40. Big Dogs (and plenty of dog food)
    41. Flour, yeast & salt
    42. Matches
    43. Writing paper/pads/pencils, solar calculators
    44. Insulated ice chests
    45. Workboots, belts, jeans & durable shirts
    46. Flashlights, Lightsticks, torches, Lanterns
    47. Journals, Diaries & Scrapbooks
    48. Garbage cans Plastic
    49. Hygiene: Shampoo, Toothbrush/paste, Mouthwash, floss
    50. Cast iron cookware
    51. Fishing supplies/tools
    52. Mosquito coils/repellent, sprays/creams
    53. Duct Tape
    54. Tarps/stakes/twine/nails/rope/spikes
    55. Candles
    56. Laundry Detergent (liquid)
    57. Backpacks, Duffel Bags
    58. Garden tools & supplies
    59. Scissors, fabrics & sewing supplies
    60. Canned Fruits, Veggies, Soups, stews, etc.
    61. Bleach
    62. Canning supplies, (Jars/lids/wax)
    63. Knives & Sharpening tools: files, stones, steel
    64. Bicycles…Tires/tubes/pumps/chains, etc
    65. Sleeping Bags & blankets/pillows/mats
    66. Carbon Monoxide Alarm (battery powered)
    67. Board Games, Cards, Dice
    68. d-con Rat poison, MOUSE PRUFE II, Roach Killer
    69. Mousetraps, Ant traps & cockroach magnets
    70. Paper plates/cups/utensils (stock up, folks)
    71. Baby wipes, oils, waterless & Antibacterial soap
    72. Rain gear, rubberized boots, etc.
    73. Shaving supplies
    74. Hand pumps & siphons (for water and for fuels)
    75. Soysauce, vinegar, bullions/gravy/soupbase
    76. Boy Scout Handbook
    77. Chocolate/Cocoa/Tang/Punch (water enhancers)
    78. “Survival-in-a-Can”
    79. Woolen clothing, scarves/ear-muffs/mittens
    80. Reading glasses
    81. Window Insulation Kit
    82. Graham crackers, saltines, pretzels, Trail mix/Jerky
    83. Popcorn, Peanut Butter, Nuts
    84. Socks, Underwear, T-shirts, etc. (extras)
    85. Lumber (all types)
    86. Wagons & carts (for transport to and from)
    87. Cots & Inflatable mattress’s
    88. Gloves: Work/warming/gardening, etc.
    89. Lantern Hangers
    90. Screen Patches, glue, nails, screws, nuts & bolts
    91. Tea
    92. Coffee

    This is obviously for a long duration event, but if you slowly work on this list -- a bit at a time -- it can all be assembled. A good way to approach this process is to try to find "dual use" versions of the above. (In other words stuff that you can use in the normal living of your life ... and, then you replace them as they are used. When a disaster rolls along you're already set.

    One thing that one of our Forum members recommended -- based on his experiences trapped after a building collapse -- was a whistle. If you add a small one to your EDC it will be there if you need it.
     
    Last edited by Cobra 6 Actual, Jan 25, 2016
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  10. microbe

    microbe EDC Junkie!!!!!

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  11. Cobra 6 Actual

    Cobra 6 Actual Loaded Pockets

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    You'll be surprised how much you already have!
     
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  12. smokingfish

    smokingfish Loaded Pockets

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    Also, diapers alcohol and tobacco are often most looted item, and great barter items, especially if you don't need it.
     
  13. Ben Rubinstein

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    Certainly food for thought Cobra 6 Actual. I'd be interested to see hear how life went on from areas under bombing/seige, etc during WWII. I think that would be a valuable resource for determining how life actually is under severe shortage/danger situations in an urban environment. I think it's more realistic than the Armageddon type situation and everyone turning into an animal type scenario (4 letter acronym that the forum doesn't let me post) that so many, specifically in the US, seem to be expecting. I'm only an amateur historian but I just don't recall much mention of that actually happening when the chips were down. It either went far more slowly in which case there was time to adapt and a semblance of order kept, or far faster in which case you hit the road as a refugee or died under shell fire and bombs.

    In any case a valuable list. For a family like mine, living in an apartment with no grounds, no way to create warmth without electricity/gas supplies, etc and with a new baby in the home, during the snow the chances of power cuts and resulting cold are very real. Light is covered, Ikea sell a zillion tealights for pennies almost and we have hundreds. That aside from about a years worth of flashlight/lantern battery capability (albeit on low power). The gas lines (for cooking) are underground so that is far less of a worry again. Heat however, that's a real problem. Especially with a very fickle electrical system here in the city. I want to buy a generator but again, being in an apartment means no storage for fuel. Us urbanites, especially those in apartments with no storage space are at a distinct disadvantage when resources are low I feel.
     
    Last edited by Ben Rubinstein, Jan 27, 2016
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  14. Cobra 6 Actual

    Cobra 6 Actual Loaded Pockets

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    Ben Rubinstein, you've nailed it, of course. A list for someone like me who lives on a few acres in the country would be somewhat different that someone's who lives in an apartment. I think I'll dig around and see if I can find something like that on the Internet.

    EDIT: OK, I'm back. It turns out that there's an "apartment preppers" website. Check it out!
     
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  15. farnorthdan
    • GITD Manix 2XL Owner

    farnorthdan Loaded Pockets

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    Having lived on the ring of fire for the better part of 35 years we are far to familiar with the shake, ratter and roll that comes from living here. What really scares #2 out of me are Tsunami's, more people die from these than do from the earth shaking, so if you live near the ocean/water and experience a big one check to see if there has been a Tsunami warning issued and/or haul but to higher ground.
     
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  16. Cody_2ZZ

    Cody_2ZZ Loaded Pockets

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    Well, Cobra 6 Actual wins this thread.

    I'm a California native and have lived, until recently, all my life on or very near the San Andreas fault, the one responsible for the 1906 San Francisco quake, and for CA locals, the big Northridge Quake of 1994. Since we lived so close to the fault and had earthquakes you could feel nearly monthly, quake preparedness is/was a big deal.

    The best advice I can give to you is not necessarily about what you have. Cobra's already done that. It's more about the mindset. Have a clear plan to get out in the quickest, safest way possible. Practice getting out in whatever way makes most sense, and have your family do the same. Get under a load-bearing doorway if you can't get outside. That's really the most important.

    On the gear side, what you want to do is to have a good kit wherever you are: home (in several places, depending on how your house is laid out), work, school, etc. The most important things to have in all these places are things to regulate your body temperature, water, food, and some kind of signaling device (pretty much in that order). The biggest problem that quakes pose is that they tend to strand people. They ruin roads and freeze movement in urban areas. You might have to hole up wherever you are. Depending on the construction and layout of your building, keeping a tool to get from room to room, or to evacuate, might not be feasible, but it's a good idea to keep something like a good ax.

    Hope that helps. I'm definitely glad I never had to live through a major quake as an adult. All I remember from living through the Northridge quake is me trying to get down a hallway and the wall literally jumping out and hitting me every second or so. The whole house was undulating. Crazy. Earthquakes are no joke.
     
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  17. smokingfish

    smokingfish Loaded Pockets

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    I was in buena park when that happened, my walls cracked. We had to move out it was so bad. I'm guessing it was just poorly built, being buena park.
     
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  18. Cobra 6 Actual

    Cobra 6 Actual Loaded Pockets

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    Cody_2ZZ, oK, buddy, I'll share the prize with you: you're absolutely right: gear without knowledge is useless!
     
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  19. microbe

    microbe EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Thanks for all the tips guys. There is some good info in this tread.
    Even if a quake makes you feel incredibly insecure, being prepared, having a plan, having a backup plan, and having some knowledge on which places offer the best chance for survival are all factors that will increase chances of living to tell and bounce back.
    I now have a few items on my shopping list that will give me some leverage in disaster scenarios.
     
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