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Duracell Battery warning

Discussion in 'Flashlights & Other Illumination Devices' started by xevious, Jan 20, 2018.

  1. Blackheart

    Blackheart Loaded Pockets

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    Good point. I should check the codes.

    Some line powered CO monitors are battery-backed, but that's just for brief outages (not the kind you get your kerosene heater out for).

    What I really would like is 12 or 24Vdc powered fire/smoke/CO/security monitoring system that runs off batteries charged from wind/solar. Maybe with some auxiliary lighting that would come on if it were dark AND the power was out. It's not so much that I NEED something like that, it's more like something to tinker with.
     
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  2. Glock1097

    Glock1097 Empty Pockets

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    Okay after reading this I need advise.
    I checked three of my d cell flashlights. Two were kept in vehicles and one in garage. They all had leaked, 2 Duracell 1 Everready. One flashligh I got all three batteries out but the other two only one battery. What is the best method to remove the b
     
  3. Blackheart

    Blackheart Loaded Pockets

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    If they're like Maglites where you can remove both the head and tail end, do that and drive the batteries out with a hammer and something like a nice, fat wooden dowel rod. If the head is fixed, dunno', I had one like that once and I think I ended up tossing it.
     
  4. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    Some flashlights can be opened from both ends (many of the Maglites, even the larger ones for instance); but I'm guessing if yours could you would have done so.

    If it wasn't a battery I'd have suggested somehow driving a screw into the object to give something to grab hold of. But that would just create a bigger mess and most likely doom the flashlight for good. If you can't jar the stuck batteries out by knocking on the side of the flashlight, you may have to consign the flashlight to oblivion? Or pray. Sorry.

    Hope someone else has more creative ideas...

    L'chaim!

    Moshe ben David
     
  5. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    Great minds....!

    L'chaim!

    Moshe ben David
     
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  6. DSRacing

    DSRacing Loaded Pockets

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    I had a similar problem a few years ago with a 5 -D cell Maglite I hadn't used in over 10 years, I sprayed some WD-40 into the barrel and let it soak for 15-20 minutes. Holding the flashlight vertically with the lens assembly pointed up, I tapped the barrel with a rubber mallet until the battery slid out.
     
  7. enine

    enine Loaded Pockets

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    The worst leakers I've had were RayOVac and RadioShack. Energizer and some off brand NiMH leaked a few then Duracall has been the least leaky for me.
     
  8. tiktok 22

    tiktok 22 Loaded Pockets

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  9. ChibiM

    ChibiM Empty Pockets

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    I never use alkaline cells in Flashlights. Period. There is no good reason for doing so. I have come come across this complaint (leaking alkalines) many many times. Do yourself a favor and use rechargeable batteries only, like eneloops. Especially if you are keeping flashlights ready for emegencies eneloops are the best.
     
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  10. xevious

    xevious Loaded Pockets

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    These are false warranties. There's tons of legalese around them. I submitted two different claims to Duracell and in both cases I got a notice of receipt of claims. After that? In one, it was denied for "inappropriate use." Some ridiculous explanation of allowing batteries to sit unused in a device too long. The other claim "disappeared."
    "Never use alkaline cells in Flashlights." "No good reason for doing so." Seriously? You have no idea how silly that sounds. The only time I had any alkaline battery leakage in a flashlight was due to the light sitting unused for a couple of years. As long as they're used periodically and changed out when dead, there's no issue -- at least that's my experience.

    Rechargeable cells are best, but not ideal for every situation. They're also much more expensive than regular alkaline cells, if you need a charged cell right away. And there's a couple of other factors, like HEAT. Keeping a flashlight with rechargeable lithium ion batteries in a car during the warm & hot months of the year is not a good idea. "Exposure of battery to extreme heat may result in an explosion." "Frequent exposure to moderately high temperatures will lower battery life." "Storing a battery in the discharged state can push it to the point where it won't recharge, and storing a battery fully charged can shorten its life." So, you're at risk when the temps inside your unattended car reach 115F... where your rechargeable batteries may be damaged or react by exploding (probably a rare circumstance). And, since it's advisable to not store a battery in a flashlight at full charge, you're looking at about 50% for longer battery life... which also means when you need the light, it would last half as long as an unused alkaline cell.
     
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  11. Dr Jekell
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    • In Omnia Paratus

    Dr Jekell I had fun once, It was awful.
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    Eneloops are NiMH not Li-Ion and take a lot of abuse that would send lesser NiMH batteries fleeing for their lives with the added benefit of retaining ~80-90% of their charge after a year.
     
  12. shrap

    shrap Loaded Pockets

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    If you're going to use alkalines, you should be checking and replacing them on a regular basis (just like rechargeables). Yearly or so.
     
  13. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

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    You actually had a leaking nimh? That really should not be possible unless you overcharge em (and that should not happen in a device) or if some nasty seller rebranded nicads as nimh...
     
  14. Blackheart

    Blackheart Loaded Pockets

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    I did have an NiMH battery (Tenergy Centura) leak once. Left a bit of white, powdery residue in my charger. Problem is, I don't know which one it was. I was charging all my lights at the semi-annual time change (U.S.) and didn't notice at first. When I did notice the residue, I had to go back through all the lights whose batteries I had charged. Every battery appeared normal and the voltages all measured roughly the same. I've since gone through several more semi-annual chargings, and every battery charges up normally and I haven't noticed any more leakage. I guess I'd have to somehow individually load test them over time to possibly find the offender. Meh. If it's holding a charge, not worth it.
     
  15. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

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    Oh that's something different, that's basically the cell venting excess pressure caused by charging it too fast (and if the sell is old enough 'too fast' can be pretty darn low). When a cell vents it's not uncommon for it to push out some powdery residue. If you want to find the culprit just charge as many cells as you can at a nice high current and every 15 minutes or so feel which one is getting significantly hotter than the others.

    Venting will only happen during abuse as opposed to alkaline leaking that will happen eventually regardless of state of charge or what you do with the cells.
     
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  16. Blackheart

    Blackheart Loaded Pockets

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    Interesting. Thanks!

    I once had a pair of alkalines leak while new and still in the package. At least they had the decency to leak BEFORE I put them in something pricey.
     
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  17. Blackbeagle
    • In Omnia Paratus

    Blackbeagle Loaded Pockets

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    I've had several instances where I've had leakage or stuck batteries. In each case, I sent in the lights along with a letter to Duracell - no I didn't call them beforehand. 3-4 months later, I usually get a couple of coupons, a "sorry" letter and some sort of pre-filled VISA card. I've never had issues with their warranty.

    That said... I've bought Duracells, put the UNOPENED package in a drawer and came back to find the batteries leaked. In my experience, I am starting to believe that their product has been getting worse. I've been seeing much more leakage in AAA than AA. For critical use, I only use lithium.
     
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  18. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

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    This is my best work;

    [​IMG]

    Pulled in 2014, batteries were dated march 2009. Not sure if mixing the different batches helped a lot but it sure made some beautifully destructive crystal formations... So better not let cells sit 5 years past due ;)
     
  19. Tru7h

    Tru7h Loaded Pockets

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    I’ve had alks of almost all brands leak in in all kinds of devices, including storage devices (ie: the original packaging). That includes coppers, bunnies, rayos, and the far east “heavy duty” wonders. I want to say that duracells have been less bad, but I’ve never counted.

    I agree that alkalines should NEVER be left in a “ready” flashlight. Not in a drawer, not in a box, not with a fox. Sam-I-Am, don’t let it be! It likely won’t work when you need it. Lithium is a more appropriate technology for medium term stored devices, NiMhs for frequent use.
    I don’t think that’s a niche opinion.

    Alkaline should definitely be phased out. but they’ll keep making them as long as people keep buying them.
     
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  20. Weko

    Weko Loaded Pockets

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    One thing that I found interesting last time I called Duracell about leaking batteries. They asked me where the batteries were made.Started to look at packs of Duracells and found they are made in the US, Thailand and China. They seem to know there is a problem with China production but few people complain so it seems they regard it as the cost of doing business.
     
    xevious likes this.