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Dremmel and Steel

Discussion in 'Do-It-Yourself & Gear Modifications' started by Wstan, Mar 10, 2010.

  1. Wstan

    Wstan Loaded Pockets

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    What are the dremmel attachments, if any, that work for notching or rounding a corner on cheap steel. I got a years old "rough use" knife from CTD. All I know is that it's stamped Fury and China and will take almost any punishment I dish out and keep a decent edge (once I put one on there). However, the grip area is a tad too small for my hands and I would like to make a few tweaks. However, since I'm apartment bound (no tool shop) and cash poor (not gonna invest in any big toy) I wanted to see what my sorry old dremmel might accomplish but I don't want to burn it up trying the impossible. Hence the question--what kinda dremmel bit will do the job if it can be done?
     
  2. sardauker

    sardauker Loaded Pockets

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    been there, done that.
    You can use the little pink stones as grinders. according the kind of steel, of course, they will wear out differently.
     
  3. jzmtl

    jzmtl Loaded Pockets

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    You can buy a whole box of dremel accessories (non dremel brand, but works just fine) for $10, get one of those and you'll have everything you need.
     
  4. xizzy

    xizzy Empty Pockets

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    Yes, jzmtl, cheap grinders are fine. But i find that i never know what's it's the correct one to use :(
    I need a manual :(
     
  5. Mitty

    Mitty Loaded Pockets

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    Well, I have all the big tools. Lathe, precision mill, 1HP bench grinder, high speed die grinder, ... and it is my Dremel that I would be reaching for to do the job you describe.

    Get a few mounted grinding wheels ranging from coarse to fine. Unless you have to work inside a small radius, larger diameter wheels are better as they cut shallower "scallops" when you hold them in one place too long. Longer wheels are better because you have more surface area and hence longer life.

    Work slowly and do not hold the Dremel in a way that blocks any of its vents. Use a light touch, as slowing down the motor will cause it to overheat. Keep the stone moving to avoid scallops. Use progressively finer abrasive wheels as you approach your final shape. Just like sharpening a knife.

    Once you have your shape, silicon carbide "wet or dry" auto body paper can be used to finish the surface. Start with 240 grit and finish with 400 or even 600.

    If you want a polished surface, use Cratex wheels. (This is the kit I have: http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=5180/Product/CRATEX_ABRASIVE_KIT, but you can buy a few individually if you don't want to drop that kind of money.)

    Regarding the $10 kit of accessories, I beg to differ. I am a lifelong cheapskate and have learned the hard way (and too often, sadly) that cheap tools are in fact the most expensive. I would not buy the retail-packaged Dremel-branded items, though, but rather go with a trustworthy source like mcmaster.com, travers.com, or Brownells. None of them will sell you junk. For example: http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=784/Product/PREMIUM_GRINDING_POINT_KIT

    Continuing on the subject of tooling, you will not need cutting bits for this job but when you do need them, buy only carbide bits. Carbon steel and high speed steel bits will wear out much more quickly, stranding you in the middle of a project with an overheating and unproductive cutting tool. Diamond is even better but good diamond cutters are very expensive; not cost-effective for my occasional needs. YMMV, of course.
     
  6. jzmtl

    jzmtl Loaded Pockets

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    This is some random info I had saved a long time ago when I just bought mine, maybe it'll be of some use to you.

     
  7. Wstan

    Wstan Loaded Pockets

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    Thanks all.
     
  8. lumbo007

    lumbo007 Loaded Pockets

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    so along those lines, is there a dremel bit that can be used to v-notch something (mainly a prybar)? I know using a file will work but that seems real tedious to just use a file.
     
  9. ERCCRE456

    ERCCRE456 Loaded Pockets

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    A cut off wheel cuts notches or slices parts of flat metal completely off quite well. You need a screw mandrel for it (most dremels come with one) and a 20 pack costs around $5 USD.
     
  10. xizzy

    xizzy Empty Pockets

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    Oh thank you jzmtl! I just saved that text!
     
  11. jakeiscrazy

    jakeiscrazy Loaded Pockets

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    When you cutting let the wheel do the work, don't push into the metal too hard. I tend it do that and end up grinding a wheel down to nothing.
     
  12. Wstan

    Wstan Loaded Pockets

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    This really is a wealth of info on dremmeling (if that's a word) that ought to be sticky w/in diy. Good stuff.
     
  13. coniferwoodsman

    coniferwoodsman Empty Pockets

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    Can't add to what the others have said, except to say- watch the steel dust- once it gets into the dremel it SEVERELY shortens it's life span. Learned it the hard way- Use a flex shaft