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Dog Bug Out Bag (BOB) w/pictures...

Discussion in 'General EDC Discussion' started by bigfoot, Apr 23, 2009.

  1. Dizos

    Dizos Loaded Pockets

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    I did a search on a dog forum and they recommend starting off at 5% of their weight and then working up to 20%.
     
  2. jehan60188

    jehan60188 Loaded Pockets

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    that's probably better advice than my 50% (just going on the fact that my hiking pack /can/ carry 60 lbs = 30 % of my weight (fatty), and i'm bipedal, so a quadraped can hold more)
    anyways, you should probably try out different packs to see which your dog prefers. good luck!
     
  3. bigfoot

    bigfoot Loaded Pockets

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    Wanted to give a report back on how this system has been holding up... we just spent a few days over at the coast. The bag worked great. I think the dog now has an easier time packing than us! We had two remaining packing cubes leftover and used them for ourselves. The cubes sure hold a lot of stuff; 2-3 days' worth of clothes each. Made loading the trunk and heading out a breeze.
     
  4. Schattenwolf

    Schattenwolf Empty Pockets

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    Good ideas!!! O0

    For how many days is the dog food?
    For how many dogs is the dog food?
    How do you carry the water for the dog?
     
  5. bigfoot

    bigfoot Loaded Pockets

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    Thanks!

    Originally we had vacuum sealed the food, but apparently the bags didn't hold up so well getting tossed around. We've changed over to gallon-sized Ziploc bags now. We can fit one or two of them in the packing cube with no problems. That would give us a good week's supply of food. We have been carrying water separately so it doesn't go bad and we rotate through it. If we needed to we could get a couple 0.5L water bottles inside the cube.
     
  6. thatJeffguy

    thatJeffguy Empty Pockets

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    That's a really fantastic idea! Lots of other great ideas here as well.

    I strongly recommend buying some saddlebags for the canine, he's big and muscular he can carry his own stuff and even a few pounds of your stuff. I'd include a bottle of iodine/providone and a small syringe for irrigating wounds. Most dog wounds in the field are to their feet, so by the time you notice it he's been walking on it for a bit. Irrigate it well and keep the dog laying down, or irrigate and cover if he must be mobile.

    What a great looking dog, as well. Probably bring a few spare tennis balls :)
     
  7. bigfoot

    bigfoot Loaded Pockets

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    Yup, his own pack and protective boots are on the list of things to get eventually. :)

    Another quick report after some real world use thanks to a family emergency this week and the great suggestions here... we've added the small lint roller, a better 6' lead, another collapsible bowl, removed the training treats, and added better tweezers for tick removal. We have switched from the Nutro food to Iams brand food (large breed). He seems to like that more, plus it has more calories so we can feed a smaller amount, not to mention Costco carries huge bags of the stuff.
     
  8. bigfoot

    bigfoot Loaded Pockets

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    Necro-thread! It's been a few years now and I wanted to update things; big thanks to ?uesto reminding me of these posts. :cool:

    At around 4 1/2 years old now, his coat is getting more gray, he still likes naps, hates squirrels and cats, loves BBQ & tennis balls, and is has been our faithful companion through thick and thin. His BOB still gets occasional use when traveling, although I need to make a conscious effort to go through it this weekend and swap out old for new. He now has a set of Ruffwear dog boots, gets some time on a leash via Tom Bihn / Krebs, has a Glo-Toob AAA (green) for his collar, but still no saddlebags yet for carrying around his own gear.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by bigfoot, May 17, 2013
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  9. ?uesto

    ?uesto Loaded Pockets

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    Can you post a picture of his collar?

    I'll try and get a picture up when I get the kit together in the coming days. I should have everything I need for my dog soon.
     
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  10. bigfoot

    bigfoot Loaded Pockets

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    Sure! I'll try to snap a few photos this weekend...

    Looking forward to seeing your pup's setup, too.
     
  11. JohnN

    JohnN Loaded Pockets

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    FWIW, be careful not to make a dog pack too heavy. Their anatomy is not conducive to carrying lots of weight with their back. Seems like the guideline is keep it under about 25% of the dog's weight.

    -john
     
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  12. bigfoot

    bigfoot Loaded Pockets

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    Okay, here is the collar and 'Toob. Need to come up with a more elegant solution, but for now, this works.

    [​IMG]
     
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  13. ddh_13

    ddh_13 Loaded Pockets

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    You've probably made changes to the BOB over the years, but in terms of the first aid kit I'd probably add a few things, especially if it is a true BOB and not just a "diaper bag for doggies" for day trips and such.

    - muzzle: cloth, plastic basket, or a piece of rope that can be safely applied. Animals in pain, even the most good-tempered, can seriously hurt people when they try and clean or bandage a wound, or examine a sore leg. Hopefully you'll never have to use it, but it's as much for his protection as yours.
    - in terms of bandages: gauze pads, roll/kling gauze, and tape are definitely the way to go (as you've said you've included). The non-stick gauze pads are even better (I think Telfa is one of the brands), especially for large scrapes or burns.
    - I would probably lose the Neosporin and add more antiseptic wipes (of the non-stinging variety). Unless you're 100% sure your dog won't be able to remove a bandage and lick off the Neosporin underneath I wouldn't use it. I don't think a small amount of ingested ointment would be a huge problem, but if you're not able to get your dog to a vet in case he does have an adverse reaction, it's better to prevent wound infection through cleanliness.
    - a pair of bandage scissors is a good idea for removing any bandages applied - it certainly is less uncomfortable than trying to remove tape stuck to hair. You could probably use bandage scissors from your own FAK, but clean/sterilise them before using them for humans again.
    - you mentioned you're adding tweezers, which is definitely a good idea, but depending on your location some sort of tick remover is also a good idea.
    - nail care: some sort of tool to remove torn nails - dog nail trimmers are best, but other scissors could probably work - and styptic powder or the equivalent to stop bleeding.
    - you mentioned Benadryl, which is a good idea - talk to your vet regarding the proper dose for your dog.
    - 3% hydrogen peroxide: useful for making dogs vomit when they have eaten things they should not have been eating (the variety of foreign bodies is astonishing). Usual dose is 1 teaspoon (5ml) of peroxide per 10 lb (4kg) of body weight, given by mouth, but again check with your vet in case they have other recommendations.

    Sorry about the length - I get a bit overexcited in regards to pet first aid...
     
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  14. Skipperbrown

    Skipperbrown Loaded Pockets

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    I'd add a long line, spare collar/leash (a slip collar works nice for reining in loose dogs that aren't yours), pack of wet tissues, couple more toys, capstar, and probotics.
     
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  15. ?uesto

    ?uesto Loaded Pockets

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    Putting the MOLLE webbing to use

    [​IMG]
     
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  16. bigfoot

    bigfoot Loaded Pockets

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    Now THERE is some ingenuity! Shhh... don't show our dog. Next thing you know I'll have pig ears and knuckle bones dangling off my pack. :p
     
  17. ?uesto

    ?uesto Loaded Pockets

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    Got my Eagle Creek Specter Pack-It today and got it loaded up. Can fit food, FAK, leash/collar, poop bags, and vet/vaccine records and photo. I need to upgrade the spare leash, but paracord will do as an emergency back up, and I'm just waiting for the collapsible bowls. This isn't really a bug out bag, but more the essentials I can take with me, whether I'm taking him somewhere for a day or two or just to the park or on a long walk. I'll try to get outdoor pics soon.

    [​IMG]
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