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Does your urban/travel EDC include make-uncomfortable-situations-better-stuff?

Discussion in 'Where, When, & How Do We Carry All This Stuff?' started by FiaOlleDog, Jun 9, 2021 at 8:18 AM.

  1. FiaOlleDog

    FiaOlleDog Loaded Pockets

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    I'm reconsidering my travel EDC (urban areas) for after the pandemic when we are allowed to do business journeys again. Based on previous experience I decided to cover some aspects like keeping me warm and something to drink/eat when shops are not available, as well as a little bit of survival stuff :D

    I've added to my travel EDC:
    • SnugPak Jungle Blanket for when getting stranded on a broken-down train or rental car (with heating failed during winter), having to wait at a train station, bus station, airport; can act as an improvised sleeping bag as the last resort
    • Sea to Summit X-Seal & Go collapsible mug with a screw-on lid (400ml / 14oz) and a titanium fold-able spork to prepare, transport and consume (hot) drinks and food; most places provide hot water but may not have coffee, tea, or snacks available, given the time of the day/night or how often the office kitchen is re-stuffed
    • titanium mug (350ml / 12oz) with lid together with an open flame burner & small bottle of denatured alcohol plus a small pot stand that slips over the mug, to heat up water to drink and prepare food (see next bullet point)
    • single servings of instant coffee/tea, Ramen noddles, porridge, granola bars
    • 10 water disinfect/treatment tablets, one tablet per liter / quart, in case water supply got contaminated

    Edit: Added photo of stuff (except Jungle Blanket)
    [​IMG]

    This stuff will enhance my usual travel setup (for 1-2 day trips):
    • small toiletry bag
    • first aid and trauma kit (including a mylar blanket for wind & rain protection and a one-time-use hand warmer heating pad)
    • clothes pouch with underwear, socks, t-shirt, polo shirt, merino gloves & beany
    • bottle of water, breakfast / lunch / dinner to-go (if available)
    • laptop, power supply, etc.

    Do you bring similar (survival) stuff as your travel/urban EDC?
    What areas you got or want to cover, based on (bad) experience while "on the road"?
     
    Last edited by FiaOlleDog, Wednesday at 2:51 PM
    #1 FiaOlleDog, Jun 9, 2021 at 8:18 AM
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2021 at 2:53 PM
    Cobra 6 Actual and MatBlack like this.
  2. MatBlack

    MatBlack Loaded Pockets

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    I'm a suburbanite. Fortunately I don't need to venture into the city.
     
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  3. FiaOlleDog

    FiaOlleDog Loaded Pockets

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    @MatBlack I live in a suburban area as well, but most of my customers are in city locations, so almost all of my travel ends - planned or unplanned - in urban places, often in industrial areas without grocery stores or restaurants, etc.

    Once on a trip to Sweden, my plane arrived late at night, and I have been lucky to catch one of the last cabs at the airport to bring me to my hotel (close to the customers site, where we had a meeting the next day). Only then i realized that this was a breakfast-only hotel in an industrial area, and the only option was to walk a mile to the next gas station (freezing/icy weather) that provided some snacks and soft-drinks ...Unhealthy and not filling, so I woke up early (5am) and almost couldn't wait for the breakfast buffet to open at 6 am :rolleyes: A water heater inside the room plus a food pouch - as described above - could have helped to avoid the hassle.

    There have been plenty of other situations during the last two decades - which kept traveling for business always with a little attitude of adventure :cool:
     
    Last edited by FiaOlleDog, Wednesday at 9:44 AM
    #3 FiaOlleDog, Jun 9, 2021 at 9:35 AM
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2021 at 9:44 AM
  4. EZDog

    EZDog EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    I always have and always will bring whatever essentials I might need to survive on my own regardless of how long I am planning to be there.
    So yes I do pretty much like you do down to the SnugPack but I carry a Jungle Bag!
    I also carry MRE meal components so that I require no added heat or water usually but also Oatmeal and Snacks,Ramen,Rice etc depending on the trip. Coffee for sure and dont even know what Porridge is and I am grateful about it I think?!

    I also never stopped travelling throughout the Pandemic though I tried to and I also am only a Domestic Traveller within the USA where not too much really changed aside from the lack of food in most Hotels that I have seen and now it is about back to how it was before anyway.
     
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  5. FiaOlleDog

    FiaOlleDog Loaded Pockets

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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porridge similar to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oatmeal

    I've read about it here on the forum before searching my local grocery store for it, tried it, and like it. Especially as there are cheap single servings available that have about 6+ month shelf-life; perfect for a food pouch to stuff and forget until needed (which is much sooner than six months).
     
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  6. EZDog

    EZDog EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Calling it Porridge just makes it sound like something from an English Fairy Tale to me though?
    It sounds like it is just Oatmeal as we know it here?

    Anyway it is just like us calling the shot the Jab which is correct maybe but hardly in context on this side of the pond?!
     
  7. thegrouch314

    thegrouch314 Loaded Pockets

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    I always have a bunch of snack bars but I don't usually carry anything that needs cooking. Even in my car 'oh crap' bag all the food is ready to eat. I do have a cup to boil water and a few purification tablets but I don't want to be cooking food when snack bars / meal replacement bars are so much easier and taste pretty good
     
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  8. FiaOlleDog

    FiaOlleDog Loaded Pockets

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    Maybe cooking is not the right word, as the Ramen noodles and the oatmeal only need hot water to be added. In cold conditions it's about to get warmth into your body; one way is to eat/drink hot/warm stuff.

    Oatmeal, porridge, or whatever it is called - we use the English word here in Germany for it as the German word "Haferschleim" (which translates into two words: "oats" and "slime") would not really help selling it :bundle-of-joy_throwvertical:
     
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  9. Grizzled

    Grizzled Empty Pockets

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    Yes. Sort of.

    If I'm traveling by car or motorcycle, in addition to the usual clothing and toiletries I pack along water, a few snacks ( usually nuts or trail mix, maybe a Cliff bar. ), drinking mug (often ceramic), a first aid kit of some sort, a fire kit, space blanket, and some tools.

    If I'm traveling by plane, I'll have a first aid kit (small, no sharps), water bottle (empty), small microfiber towel, and some TSA-friendly tools. Once through security, I'll fill up the water bottle and toss a few snack in my bag. As Douglas Adams noted, a towel has many uses.

    The car and motorcycle FAK contains some water purification tablets. The airplane FAK doesn't, but maybe it should. I assume that I'll find clean water when I land (assuming a CONUS destination).

    I'm a die-hard spork fan and never travel without a spork.

    On two occasions I've lost my spork during a trip. For the one instance, I found a replacement at a local Cabela's. In the other instance I was able to source a travel spoon at a local thrift shop--a sweet old antique silver spoon--for $1. Not a spork, but at least I had a spoon. I find a spork (or replacement spoon) to be useful if I'm getting food from local markets instead of more expensive restaurants. Even fast food places have pretty junky utensils. If I walk over to the local ice cream shop, I bring my spork. The little plastic spoons they have are junk, and the pleasure of a good bowl of Mint Chocolate chip is greatly enhance by using a decent utensil.

    Carry a spork, live like a king.
     
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  10. EZDog

    EZDog EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Certainly sounds appetizing though!


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