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Does anyone ever use Paracord

Discussion in 'General EDC Discussion' started by jellyf, Feb 14, 2019.

  1. el_murdoque

    el_murdoque Loaded Pockets

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    I don't carry paracord. I always have a few meters of 3mm nautical dyneema line in my bag. It's lighter, easier to transport, holds more than three times the load and is much more resistant to friction. You could tow a car with that line. It's costly, but also lasts a very long time.
    You can splice loops with a SAK with surprising ease and speed.
    This is acutally one of the items in my bag that earned its place. I've found myself in need of a piece of string/rope often enough that I started bringing one. I've used it in a number of ways, among them (from the top of my head):
    -Cloths line
    -hanging a Hammock
    -tying something down on a motorcycle
    -repairing something in a fix
    -dog leash
    -replacing a broken belt on the roof rack
     
  2. severdhed

    severdhed Loaded Pockets

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    i've used it a few times over the years, mostly with my gravity hook xs. I keep about 15ft of it in a small bundle connected to my gravity hook, which was super handy when my daughter got hit in the face with a ball and her glasses went flying off and directly into a storm drain. I've used paracord to tie open a door a few times. It also works well to throw through a drop-ceiling to pull ethernet cables in a pinch.
     
  3. HeadOffice

    HeadOffice Loaded Pockets

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    Just made a great handle for my Alice Pack - Cobra weave...
     
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  4. EDChris

    EDChris Loaded Pockets

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    I always keep about 15 feet of paracord in my pocket. Here are a few things I have used my pocket paracord for:

    1) I have used the paracord to make an impromptu leash for a stray dog so I was able to bring it back home.

    2) During a get-together with family, I used the paracord to tie open the back door so that the food could easily be brought out. The wind had kept slamming the door closed.

    3) When refilling my propane containers, I use the paracord to tie the containers down in the back of my SUV so they don't roll around.

    4) I have used it to tie one end on my belt and another on a chain link fence at the top of a hill while planting things for my wife. << not recommended, but it did keep me from sliding down hill.

    5) When going on a local hike with family, most of us were carrying water bottles. I got tired of carrying it so I created a water bottle sling. I'm sure it looked dorky but I am in my 40's so dorkiness fits me well.

    I find that knowing several different types of knots helps to create options for paracord use. The more knots you know, the more useful it is.
     
    #44 EDChris, Dec 17, 2020
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2020
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  5. TheGremlin

    TheGremlin Loaded Pockets

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    I have used it a couple of times. On a road trip the latch on the driver door failed, and I used 550 to tie the door shut for the remainder of the trip. I also disassembled a bracelet to hold the hatch on my wife's suv down after an unexpected purchase. I've used it for other small things, but those are the ones sticking out in my mind. So, yes, I've used it enough to never want to be without it.

    Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk
     
  6. Wishoot

    Wishoot Loaded Pockets

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    Since this post, I've HAD to use it several times. I've used it to secure kayaks when the cam straps failed in the middle of the highway. Used to secure a small anchor to kayaks. Used to tie a bundle of logs for carrying. Used to replace the crappy laces on my Keen boots.
     
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  7. aicolainen

    aicolainen Loaded Pockets

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    Not for EDC. Never carried, never needed.
    I use it for outdoors though. Not sure I even like it all that much, but it's easily available.
    Kept 90 feet in my old office. It was on the second floor in the end of a hallway. Just a perfect place to get trapped in a fire. Not the best rappelling line ever, but beats jumping out the window by a mile.
     
  8. EDChris

    EDChris Loaded Pockets

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    I am glad you never had to use it because paracord will never be able to hold a person unless that person is under 100 pounds. The 550 rating is for static force without knots. With knots and any kind of movement, the rating drops significantly. The general rule is that you can safely lift 10% of the static line strength. That is 55 pounds. Anything above that is risking injury.

    I agree that paracord isn't ideal. If I leave it out in the sun for a couple weeks to a month it starts to become faded and brittle. But it is cheap and easy to get and works for most tasks I need it for.
     
    #48 EDChris, Dec 18, 2020
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2020
  9. aicolainen

    aicolainen Loaded Pockets

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    I agree about the part of not having to use it :)

    The rest, although good advice, isn’t entirely relevant. With 30m of paracord and approximately 4m down, I’m sure I could figure out a way.

    There are absolutely better tools for this job to be found, but I didn’t expect to ever use it, It didn’t need to be perfect. It’s about having options. Any alternative to jumping out the window and breaking a lot of bones would probably appear very favorable if it came down to it. A sealed pack of 30m/90ft of paracord I could easily fit in one of my drawers without much clutter and drawing attention. It was enough to give me that option.
     
  10. jackknife

    jackknife Loaded Pockets

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    Never carry paranoid anymore. I've actually come to dislike the stuff, but then I'm an old fart curmudgeon that grew up using the old jute twine in the 1950's. I went back to the jute. Its soooo cheap that its disposable stuff, can be used as tinder for a fire stick, can be doubled over and twisted to increase strength a lot, and its biodegradable. A big hundred yard ball of the the stuff is a small fraction of the price of paranoid, and works just as well for most things and holds knots way way better. I like bank line a lot too.

    Paracord is one of those things that are a money making trendy item for the EDC/prepper crowd.
     
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  11. Sentinel-14

    Sentinel-14 Loaded Pockets

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    tarred #36 bankline is the new paracord. :) I've been seeing it all over the prepper/bushcrafter communities as being the superior option. It's got somewhat lower tensile strength (~330lbs vs 550) but far less bulk and you get tighter/cleaner knots out of it.

    I dont carry paracord with me but I do have a spooltool loaded up with some in my truck, and it's come in handy when I needed cordage for things. One time the laces in my boots gave out, so they were replaced with paracord. Works well enough, and now I have snazzy red boot-laces. :p Used the cord to tie down some things while helping friends move, fashioned loops for improvised prussik knots for a class, etc...

    For my use and needs I'll probably switch to bankline when I run out of paracord. Wouldn't want it for boot laces, but for most things I need cordage for the bankline will do fine, and I wouldnt mind getting more line for the same bulk in my pack. That said, paracord has it's uses for sure.
     
    #51 Sentinel-14, Dec 26, 2020
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2020
  12. TheGremlin

    TheGremlin Loaded Pockets

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    For those of you that already use the bankline- how do you deal with the tar and minimize staining?

    Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk
     
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  13. MORT

    MORT Loaded Pockets

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    Duct tape and ties play major roles in a man's life but paracord has its place. I was headed for the dump towing my 30 year old pop up camper turned dump trailer. The frame of the trailer depended heavily on the well rotted plywood of the box. The whole thing let go, and everything dropped on the tires. I stood there staring at it, AAA told me no trailer, just vehicles. I'm thinking of the cost of getting a flatbed to bring it home. No way, removed the paracord that secured the load, rigged it pull the box off the tires, preceded to the dump, where I removed to plate and gifted them the whole mess minus paracord.
     
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  14. Krs

    Krs Loaded Pockets

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    Lol, just like me... and probably just like 90% of the EDC community :)
     
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  15. Krs

    Krs Loaded Pockets

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    Absolutely agree.
    However is not always easy to get *jute* twine nowadays. The new stuff is made from some sort of plastic fiber, which has the same strength as jute twine, and which does NOT hold the knots as good. Not biodegradable either. :(
    But generally yes, it is the best option and it is the best replacement for paracord.
     
  16. godcode

    godcode Loaded Pockets

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    seldom, but if I use paracord, its for making yet another Paracord bracelet or use it for gear/home improvement. Last time I used paracord, it is to create a key hanger for my belt and to wrap the handlebar of a tactical dog vest so I can attach a DRING in the front area of the vest (though I ended up using Grimlock with added Zip ties. Last time I used paracord for real emergency I think was 2 years ago.

    [​IMG]
     
  17. jdavidboyd

    jdavidboyd Loaded Pockets

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    I bet Goodest Boy can be fierce when he doesn't get his treats! :)
     
  18. jdavidboyd

    jdavidboyd Loaded Pockets

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    I've seen "jute" twine for sale at Tractor Supply, and the packaging says "100% real". Doesn't seem to be any plastic in it at all. Never felt like spending the buck or so it cost and seeing how well it burns....
     
  19. jdavidboyd

    jdavidboyd Loaded Pockets

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    I'd like an answer to this as well. Is it really very sticky? That seems like a nightmare to handle....
     
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  20. EDChris

    EDChris Loaded Pockets

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    When it is new, it is tacky but not really sticky but has a strong tar smell. I let mine sit out (unwrapped from the plastic wrapper) for a few months before using it. By then, it is basically just black string.

    I am about 90% done with my current roll and my new roll has been sitting for a couple months and the tar smell is nearly gone.