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Does anyone EDC a portable jump starter in their vehicle?

Discussion in 'Electronic Devices' started by DSRacing, Mar 7, 2018.

  1. Jay-uk

    Jay-uk Loaded Pockets

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    Always carry one it's helped a lot of people
     
  2. thatotherguy

    thatotherguy EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    I do carry one and have had to use it to jumpstart a company car three times in the span of an hour. The car was junk, but the battery worked great.
     
  3. Cervantes

    Cervantes Loaded Pockets

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    After a week of PTO, went back to work and tried to crank my work vehicle.. -__-.. I have a model sold at Lowes, charged my battery up pretty well, and also charges up my smart phone.. Weighs about 8 pounds.
     
  4. Jim Hughes

    Jim Hughes Loaded Pockets

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    Yes I have a Power block Omega Pro #80600R, I got from Woot for around $40, IIRC. Has 350 Amps Starting and 700 Peak Amps power. Set up so you can charge Lap tops, Smart Phones etc too. With all the gear in a 6" x 5" x 2" zippered case. Fits in most Glove boxes. This AM Fired up my 71 VW Bug with a bad battery several years old, made worse by Sitting for 4 mos waiting on new Trannie and 2 mos for new carbs and other engine work. Bingo fired right up. I've used the big bulky 20# one from auto parts stores for years, as I walked to work and home 1/2 mile daily, 1979-2006. 2 Cars and FJ 40 sat in drive most of the time. This is neater, quicker, easier to carry and use. Unit is 5" x 3" x 1" in size weighs maybe a pound. I like it a lot.
     
    #24 Jim Hughes, Apr 6, 2018
    Last edited: May 4, 2018
  5. jbraman

    jbraman Loaded Pockets

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    Absolutely. I couldn’t tell you what brand or where I got it but it has enough juice for about 5 starts on my GMC Yukon before it needs charging.
     
  6. Mark_Trail

    Mark_Trail Loaded Pockets

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    I don't. However, I usually do have a fully charged 70 amp battery and cables in the trunk.
     
  7. thegrouch314

    thegrouch314 Loaded Pockets

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    Hmm, seeing these posts has cemented my will to get one. I drive a piece of crap Suzuki and I've needed a jump three times in the last three months. Thankfully, every time someone has been able to get there within an hour or so to save me calling out breakdown assistance but it would be much easier to carry a battery one. I haven't even bothered putting the jump leads back in the boot. They're still on the back seat for next time

    Anyone have a recommendation for a good budget option? (If I could afford an expensive portable jump starter, I'd buy a better car)
     
  8. Mark_Trail

    Mark_Trail Loaded Pockets

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    ^
    While doing that also get new battery to your Suzuki ;)


    Sent from my NSA monitored iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    kikaida and Moshe ben David like this.
  9. EZDog

    EZDog EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    This does seem kind of the obvious question?
     
  10. Tru7h

    Tru7h Loaded Pockets

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    +1. A good quality AGM flat plate battery with cold crank amps at or above the manufacture specs is a GREAT idea.

    There’s plenty of great lithium jump battery options under $75 on amazon and similar sites.
     
  11. thatotherguy

    thatotherguy EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Ive got a Stanley Fatmax 1000mAh jump battery and it, as I stated before, jumped a 2001 Ford Taurus three times on one charge without breaking a sweat. Ive also used it to jump a Mazda sedan and a 2005 GMC Sierra, and it has started and run a Ford Ranger with the battery completely disconnected as a test. Works gangbusters. Recharges on a standard extension cord, no specialty cords to worry about. Has a task light, a 12v DC outlet/inlet, a USB outlet, and an air compressor on board too.
     
    kikaida and thegrouch314 like this.
  12. sygyzy

    sygyzy Loaded Pockets

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    I carry one and honestly it's very questionable to me if it actually does anything. Jumpstarting a car takes a lot of energy and I just don't think the smaller guys have the juice. I tried mine out on my car (did nothing) and on my friend's mom's car and it started up instantly. I have one of the fancy lithium battery ones which can of course double as a battery pack to recharge your phone or devices. I leave mine in the trunk though so it's strictly there to get out of a jam. I tried to find the model but coudn't, sorry.
     
  13. Tru7h

    Tru7h Loaded Pockets

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    I’ve had that happen with lithium jumpstart batteries as well. It usually means the car’s battery is truly shot. The internal resistance or something is super high (also why it’s discharged), and you need a MASSIVE charge to get through it.
     
  14. kikaida

    kikaida Loaded Pockets

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    Scotty Kilmer is one of my youtube subscriptions and he posted a video today of a product that can be superior to the lead-acid battery packs and the lithium-ion battery packs, it's a supercapacitor starter. It uses the remaining capacity of a battery to charge itself within a few minutes and it will start the vehicle. As a young electrical engineering student back in the day, I remember that capacitors can store a lot of energy, but only for a few seconds, which is why when you restart an electronic item, you have to wait a few seconds to a minute to let the capacitors discharge. I haven't bought one of these supercapacitors myself yet, so just take a look at the video. There will be no need to keep a lead acid or lithium battery charged, and these supercapacitors can be used hundreds of thousands of times.



    However, according to Scotty, this is limited to gasoline engines.
     
    Last edited by kikaida, May 15, 2018
    #34 kikaida, May 15, 2018
    Last edited: May 15, 2018
  15. kikaida

    kikaida Loaded Pockets

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    Just be careful about leaving that lithium battery pack in the trunk during the summer. During the summer, heat in the trunk can reach dangerously high temperatures and there is the risk of that lithium battery pack catching fire and/or exploding. We've all read about exploding lithium batteries.

    https://www.thoughtco.com/why-lithium-batteries-catch-fire-606814
     
    Moshe ben David likes this.
  16. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    @kikaida: I assure you that capacitor storage durations do vary. My first job was as a QC/QA Engineer in a factory that produced capacitors. Mostly electrolytics, but also film and solid tantalum. Later changed companies and was Engineering Manager at a plant that specialized in mica capacitors. Many of the electrolytics can store an immense charge, and can do so for quite a duration. (Been a long long long time, so I don't recall exact specs). I'll go out on a limb and suggest that the 'computer' grade lytics that are up in the thousands of micro farads can do so, and IIRC, so can the so-called AC start caps. We were always very careful handling them just to be sure they were discharged so that we wouldn't get zapped. At those ratings, that kind of a 'zap' could have quite an impact!

    Even in the solid state world, many capacitors store a charge for a very long time. Example being many solar watches, which in fact are charging up a capacitor, not a battery. I have a Casio digital that is solar charged to a capacitor -- and will hold charge for approx 3 weeks. I could be wrong but I think many of the G-shocks are similar; as are the Citizen Eco-watches.

    I'd even argue that the 'line' separating what is a capacitor and what is a battery is somewhat fuzzy, particularly for the solid state caps at one end and for the larger electrolytics at the other end!

    L'chaim!

    Moshe ben David