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Diamonds, vs Aluminum Oxide, vs Silicon Carbide, vs Novaculite, vs Garnets, etc.

Discussion in 'Sharpening Stuff -- Stones, Strops, and Systems' started by Sharp Knife, May 4, 2016.

  1. Sharp Knife

    Sharp Knife Loaded Pockets

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    Which types of Abrasives have you used for Sharpening, with great success?

    Most Synthetic Waterstones use Aluminum Oxide, many of the vintage Black and Grey synthetic stones use Silicon Carbide, Arkansas stones are Novaculite, BBW's and Coticules contain Garnets, etc.

    I have been very impressed by Silicon Carbide myself. It cuts fast, and puts teeth on that edge. Creates a good edge for fast cutting and hard use. Follow it up with Aluminum Oxide, or Novaculite, and you get Hair Popping Sharp edges.
     
    Last edited by Sharp Knife, May 5, 2016
  2. Sharp Knife

    Sharp Knife Loaded Pockets

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    Hoping that some of the high grit Waterstone guys will chime in.
     
  3. xbanker
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    xbanker Geriatric Admin
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    Sharp Knife

    Question(s) about waterstone basics. For someone looking to try first time ...

    What grit(s) in a "starter set?" Suppose this influenced by what's used prior to waterstone.

    Like most bits of gear, wide spectrum of purveyors, quality and prices. For the waterstone-unknowing (that would be me), any tips on selection criteria? Necessary to invest in high-dollar stone(s) to achieve reasonable results? Anything to avoid when selecting?

    Thanks!
     
  4. Sharp Knife

    Sharp Knife Loaded Pockets

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    From the stuff I have read in the past, posted on the internet by the hardcore straight razor sharpening folks; Shapton is a good manufacturer of man made synthetic Waterstones. Their Shapton Glass stones don't require pre soaking in water prior to use. Many people Really like their Chosera stones, but they require pre soaking, and more frequent flattening. To get any better quality, it seems you have to use the natural stones, of which there are multiple varieties, at widely varying price levels.
     
    Last edited by Sharp Knife, May 9, 2016
  5. SV-97

    SV-97 Loaded Pockets

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    If you do reprofiling: 200
    otherwise start at 400
    800 for relatively coarse edge /1000 lower end polish
    something to really polish if you wanna go further(I use a 10k stone to finish and strop "the carter way" with paper over the stone then a few strokes on leather and finally 3 strokes per side on the sharpmaker ultra fine to kind of roughen it up again, with the goal of polished micro teeth), but 1000 works very good for a working edge

    My 200, 400, 800 and 1000 stones are cheapo stones, the 10k is a naniwa professional series. But I don't have experience with other more expensive stones that may give even better results. The cheap stuff will generally clog up quicker than the more expensive ones
     
    Last edited by SV-97, May 9, 2016
    xbanker likes this.
  6. Sharp Knife

    Sharp Knife Loaded Pockets

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    Just throwing some grit sizes around for progression ideas:
    100 - 150 (Coarse Silicon Carbide, Coarse Aluminum Oxide)
    300 - 400 (Coarse Diamond, Wet/Dry Sandpaper)
    600 - 800 (Soft Arkansas, Fine Diamond, Wet/Dry Sandpaper)
    1000 - 1500 (Black Arkansas, Translucent Arkansas, Wet/Dry Sandpaper)
    Strop

    Could easily skip the 1000 - 1500 stage and go straight to a Strop, if you spend enough time at the lower grits first.
     
    Last edited by Sharp Knife, May 9, 2016
  7. BadDad

    BadDad Empty Pockets

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    I like Naniwa Super Stones and JNS/Mutukusuyama stones for synthetic waterstones. Both are "splash and go", and don't require soaking. I tend to use these stones for my razors, though, not knives. 9.5 times out of 10, for knives, I'll go with Arkansas stones and oil.

    Super Stones on lower grits are soft. The 1k needs lapping after every use. It produces a lot of mud, and dishes out rather quickly. The JNS 1k is a nice, hard stone. Slow to raise mud, slow to dish.

    For grits lower than about 800, I use diamond or SiC and oil. I just find that they perform "well enough" for their cost outlay. I only go that low when I'm fixing chips or funky bevels.

    Naniwa Super Stones and Chosera get pricey, quick. JNS stones are much more reasonably priced in my opinion. Even the Red Aoto 4k is less than $90, and it's a brick. I also really like the feedback from them. Good response. The Naniwa aren't bad, I just prefer the feel and feedback from the JNS synthetics.

    For razors, I use synthetics up to 12k, and finish on a variety of natural slates, Japanese and otherwise.

    For knives, I can't see any reason to go higher than 4k, and even that is more than needed in most cases. I only go that high with my kitchen knives. Once you get into that high of a grit range, you aren't getting any sharper, you're just polishing and refining the edge. Great for super-smooth and clean cuts, but the more refined the edge, the easier it dulls and gets damaged.