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Cyclists / Bike Lights

Discussion in 'Flashlights & Other Illumination Devices' started by Halligan, Sep 16, 2012.

  1. Halligan

    Halligan Loaded Pockets

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    Looking for a front bike light strobe. I have seen plenty of the multi led flashies which are OK at night, but the one I saw yesterday either appeared purpose built for a bike with a quality single LED or a good flashlight with a bracket. I saw it approaching me for better than a 1/2 mile in full sunlight, was going fairly fast so it was tough to see detail.
     
  2. T.H.Cone

    T.H.Cone I am senor Fluffy, hear me roar

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    Halligan, Advising you on this would take a tome, so here is a link that might answer all you questions. After you absorb some of that, I'd be happy to help answer other questions. I will say that up until about five years ago, my wife and I, as well as my cycling buddies, mostly use higher end Niterider lights. Since joining BLF, I've come to discover that you can get virtually all of the performance at a fraction of the cost.
     
  3. cowsmilk

    cowsmilk EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Have you had a chance to check any of your local bike shops?

    I'm mobile, baby! :)
     
  4. Halligan

    Halligan Loaded Pockets

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    I'll look around, but so far I haven't been impressed with what is in the bike shops and I really don't want a Niterider or similar system that THC talked about. Im thinking what I saw was a tactical light with a handlebar mount. I am checking the budget light forums at the moment! :)
     
  5. mrpink

    mrpink Banned

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    fenix light mount. i get all the modes i want depending on which light i choose.
     
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  6. T.H.Cone

    T.H.Cone I am senor Fluffy, hear me roar

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    Haligan, you can certainly get a cheap "tactical" light like a Solarforce L2P, some rechargeable 18650 batteries, a multi mode drop in, and a handle bar mount for between $50 and $60 I would guess. Maybe a little more. I know guys who go this route and are happy. But I think there are dedicated budget bike lights for just slight more that perform better. I'd say the real difference between some thing like the night lights coming from inside the bike industry and the budget alternative is that you need to be a more knowledgeable user when you go cheap. The main issue arises when you are dealing with the 18650s and the other lithium Ion rechargeables because you have to test them to make sure that the voltage is pretty much the same in all the batteries that are going to be used together or you may not be happy with the short lived but very hot and bright amount of light you will get... if you catch my meaning.
     
  7. mrpink

    mrpink Banned

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    fenix bike mount is about $20, nobody needs to use lithium u can mount whatever light u want on the bike. 2Xaa works well for me. i put my solaforce or my fenix e21, or my nitecore 1XAA on depending on what i need
     
  8. T.H.Cone

    T.H.Cone I am senor Fluffy, hear me roar

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    I wasn't suggesting that you have to use any specific battery type, but it seems most people setting up bike lights on the cheap go this route. I think that if you regularly ride longer distances in places that don't have any ambient light in the environment (say a four hour MTB ride), then the power and run time afforded by AAs may not be the best answer. Of course, YMMV.
     
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  9. Halligan

    Halligan Loaded Pockets

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    great replies, I am a daylight rider 99% and occasionally get caught out after the street lights come on. To be honest what i am really worried about is visibility, particularly to the rear, I was kind of think of rigging up a rearward white strobe. The amount of distracted and texting drivers I see really concerns me for getting hit from behind. I ride defensively and can deal with everyone I can see for the most part, but getting run over from behind is something that is increasing. I have been experimenting with some rearview mirrors as well.
     
  10. MrJingles

    MrJingles Empty Pockets

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    http://ecom1.planetbike.com/tailights.html

    Superflash or Superflash turbo, these are the only blinkies I'll run on my bike. I have two of the regular SF's and they are no joke, I can see them lighting up street signs about 3/4 to 1 mile away and they resemble emergency vehicle. I'm in the same situation myself where I just use them if I'm caught out in the night and haven't changed the batteries in years.

    Forgot to add I just checked out the prices and saw the turbo is only 4 dollars more and after checking youtube I would definately pay extra for that. Seems like they upgraded the pattern and doubled the LED size (these lights do resemble emergency vehicles in a way).
     
    Last edited by MrJingles, Sep 16, 2012
  11. xtal

    xtal Loaded Pockets

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    I use the Superflash as well, and I won't cycle with anything else. I'm on a bicycle 5-7 days a week (commuting as well as pleasure riding). My Superflash is very beat up after four years of use (and occasionally being dropped) and still works well.
     
  12. reppans

    reppans Loaded Pockets

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    I think it's very important to stay with normal road convention with lights - red lights on the rear and white in the front. I've too often seen drivers try to squeeze to the right of white solid or blinking lights, thinking they are (or should be) coming toward them from the opposing direction. I like random-pattern blinking red bike lights from Cateye, personally.

    On the front, I like dedicated flashlights on bike mounts - much more powerful and efficient than anything the bike light companies can put out. The EagleTac D25 Clicky series (I have the D25A Ti NW, which is also my EDC) has the best bike strobes I've seen in light so far. Sure its got the tactical strobes (10/sec), which I wouldn't use on a bike, but it also has two slow frequency steady blinking modes that say "warning" vs "HELP! POLICE!". One is max lumens @ 2/sec and the other is 50% lumens @ 1/sec.

    I use Twofish Lockblocks for mounts - a perpendicular one for the handlebars, and a parallel one on the top of my bike helmet.
     
  13. AcesQ

    AcesQ Loaded Pockets

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    This is my bike light:

    [​IMG]

    I mount my good old Fenix LD20 on a Fenix AF02 bike mount. You don't necessary have to use the same light as me. Any 1 x AA or 2 x AA flashlight should fit that bike mount. Hope this information helps you.
     
  14. Blerv

    Blerv Loaded Pockets

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    Goals:

    * How far you need the light to throw? (eg: 50 yards, 100 yards, 200 yards, etc)
    * How big can the light be?
    * How long do you need it to run and do you have any preference on battery type?

    Most of the questions above intermix. Large reflector heads are efficient throwers, if you need 6 hours of runtime you will need a very fat or long battery tube (or extenders).

    I have to think a modern performance flashlight is going to easily out-throw a bike light utilizing a multi-die setup. It's a question of what you need and what compromise you are willing to accept (size, price, etc).