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Cravats or Triangle Bandages?

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by bmstrong, Feb 15, 2016.

  1. bmstrong

    bmstrong Loaded Pockets

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    Anyone still using one in your IFAK? Do you have a preferred maker/brand/fabric cravat?
     
  2. Ian McDevitt

    Ian McDevitt Loaded Pockets

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    Yea. They are used all over the world and are a great item to have. Cut one out of an old t-shirt.
     
  3. CatherineM
    • In Omnia Paratus

    CatherineM Loaded Pockets

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    Very popular with the St. John Ambulance here. I have a vacuum sealed one in my kit.


    Sent by owl post.
     
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  4. PragmaticMurphyist

    PragmaticMurphyist Loaded Pockets

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    Yep, I have a couple in each of my PFAK, car kit and home kit. Mine are sterile Reliance Medical, mainly because they were cheap and easily available on Amazon!
     
  5. RAMBOCAT

    RAMBOCAT Loaded Pockets

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    12 PIECE PACK of 40" x 40" x 56" NON-WOVEN COTTON SKIN COLOR TRIANGULAR BANDAGES.......$7 on AMAZON.
     
  6. badphishRN

    badphishRN Empty Pockets

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    a must have for any FAK carry several
     
  7. TatendaZim

    TatendaZim Empty Pockets

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    The green military cravat (Ebay) is made of stronger woven material than you will get with the woven ones from Dynarex and Rescue Essentials. The military version is more expensive, has significantly better safety pins and only slightly larger (thicker) packaging.
    [​IMG]
     
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  8. Timlugia

    Timlugia Loaded Pockets

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    Amazon has military ones for $0.75 per units
    Chinook Medical has a sterile version with anti-microbial and water-resistant, supposedly can be used directly above wound, but costs $6.

    Tac-Med solution used to sell a very good and compact one, with package smaller than military version. But they have since discontinued it
     
  9. TatendaZim

    TatendaZim Empty Pockets

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    Not as compact as the others, but also consider the H&H Dry Sterile Burn Dressing and Super Combat Cravat.
     
  10. madkins007

    madkins007 Loaded Pockets

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    For EDC- I just use a bandanna and whatever else I can scrounge on hand. Lots of things can be made into bandaging supplies in an emergency (we always discussed this in the Red Cross classes I used to teach.

    It is a good idea to not get too comfortable with needing first aid tools. Murphy's Law of FAKs is you won't have one when you need it. If you have one, you won't have the supplies you most need. If yours is complete and freshly stocked, you will be the victim.

    For cars, group, and other kits where weight/space are not key issues, one option is to get thrift store sheets or similar materials and cut out lots of roller bandages and triangular bandages (if you need one in an emergency, you almost always need 3 or more!)

    Prepacked units like those shown are great where space is at more of a premium.
     
  11. Tom Tabal

    Tom Tabal Loaded Pockets

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    .
     
    Last edited by Tom Tabal, Jul 29, 2021
    #11 Tom Tabal, May 13, 2016
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2021
  12. Swe_Nurse

    Swe_Nurse Loaded Pockets

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    While you're correct about not getting too comfortable with first aid supplies it is equally important not to "plan to improvise" as this is a recipe for disaster. I've seen people carry a few bandanas/sheets and claim that they are to be used as combat bandages, tourniquets, ground cover, pressure dressings and so on. This is a very dangerous mindset and mostly practiced by people with little to no training or practical first aid experience.

    There's a golden middle here, plan to use proper supplies, learn to improvise. You need both skill sets, but just as you're likely to have a knife available to you if you're in a wilderness survival situation if you carry one when you go hiking (or whatever you do) you're likely to still have your first aid kit if you carry one with you if an accident happen. Equipment simply doesn't go missing as much as some survivalists/preppers/etc. like to believe and plan for.
     
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  13. GQP

    GQP Loaded Pockets

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    I carry one in most FAKs. Its just one of those items that has so many uses that its more than worth the space it takes up.
     
  14. bmstrong

    bmstrong Loaded Pockets

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  15. Karmakanic

    Karmakanic Loaded Pockets

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    When I did my initial First Aid training the triangular bandage was said to be the most useful item in the first aid kit.
    30 years on the latest UK standard (BS8599) indicates that they are less of a priority than other items in the kit. This is the official rationale behind it.

    Why did we need a new standard?
    Despite many EU states having a national standard for workplace first aid kits, until now, the UK did not. The BHTA guidelines, established in 1997 were in need of revision because training protocols have changed, there are heightened concerns with infection control, and new technology is now available at affordable prices.
    • There were only one pair of gloves in a 10 person kit - yet 33 dressings.
    • There were 4 triangular bandages - even though the training protocols no longer indicatetheir use for immobilisation of lower limb fractures.
    • Burns gel dressings are extensively used in first aid - now very available and affordable.
    The new kits have good quantities of plasters and wipes, a common criticism of the old ones.
     
  16. thegrouch314

    thegrouch314 Loaded Pockets

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    i've personally never liked them
    they have their uses, certainly in making slings, but for almost anything else i'm rather use a roller bandage or something else

    i see why people like them and i do usually have one in my FAK for use as a sling
     
  17. wahoowad

    wahoowad Loaded Pockets

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    Aside from using as a sling, what are some common uses for a triangle bandage? My kit has (or will have) an Israeli compression bandage and several medium ABD bandages. What role does the triangle bandage play?

    Thanks
     
  18. Jim Hughes

    Jim Hughes Loaded Pockets

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    Boy Scouts Turned them into emergency Swimming Trunks. Knot too together at Triangle apex and tie them on. I've see 4 of them used for 2 piece for ladies. Bottoms ala Boy Scouts. Two tied together at long ends in center of chest and the short side folded into 2 cups. Loose end tied at center of back.