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CPR Mask with or without filter....

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by b.s., Jan 15, 2011.

  1. b.s.

    b.s. Loaded Pockets

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    I'm pretty sure I know the answer to this question, but after breathing through a CPR mask with the filter and 1 way valve, I noticed a huge difference with and without the filter...

    my question is:

    does the filter reduce the efficacy of the mask to EVER warrant removing it?

    ....

    ie... If I'm performing CPR on say... a loved one, and I'm not concerned about blood transmission and using the 1 way valve, would removing the filter increase my chances of saving a life?
     
  2. tower
    • In Omnia Paratus

    tower Loaded Pockets

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    No. Removing it would REDUCE the efficacy. You and your patient would end up trading CO2 back and forth.
     
  3. Dr Jekell
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    Dr Jekell I had fun once, It was awful.
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    You are thinking of air movement.

    You forgot that some patients can end up puking up their stomach contents due to the amount of air being forced into the stomach during RB.

    Tasting someone else's puke is not fun at all, especially if they have been drinking, that is why they put the filters on the masks.
     
  4. spiritof76

    spiritof76 Loaded Pockets

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    If you're really concerned about saving their lives in case of cardiac arrest, do continuous chest compressions at 100 2-inch compressions per minute, nothing else. Study after study shows it works better than compressions with rescue breathing (see the Journal of Resuscitation), and if you look at the Journal of Emergency Medical Services, ambulance services around the country that have switched to CC-only say they have significantly improved survival rates and will never go back to 30:2. It's just not worth staying with a "traditional" technique just because that's what you were taught if it's proven to be inferior.

    http://www.jems.com/article/patient-care/new-ccr-technique-proves-succe

    Rescue breathing interrupts compressions, which immediately stops blood flow to both brain and heart, and increases intrathoracic pressure, which impedes blood return to the heart. The only time you need ventilation is for a drowning victim or drug overdose. The American Heart Association is slowly moving in that direction but hasn't completely changed policy yet. They're a little hidebound. They'll get there in about 5-10 years.
     
  5. mta5888

    mta5888 Loaded Pockets

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    The one way valve will not reduce effectiveness of it. And it's there for your protection, putting air into a patient can cause issues great for CPR but you can put air in to the patient stomach which can cause vomitting. That's why tubing someone with an ET or CombiTube or LMA it's so important to place it correctly cause you don't wanna air the stomach up. That valve is be the thing that gonna keep vomitus and fluids from getting to you. CO2 is not a big deal, the gas we breath out is still 19% O2 which is just fine, we only use about 3% percent of the O2 well take in.
     
  6. Rev. Chuck

    Rev. Chuck Loaded Pockets

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  7. VinnyP
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    VinnyP Loaded Pockets

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    It's amazing how quickly things go out of date, here in Europe and the UK we did change to compressions only for a year. The results were promising but actually were because of less delay and better quality compresions. The latest studies have reversed that for trained responders. High quality, deeper, faster chest compressions. But ventilations at 30-2 are back with minimal delays as the most effective.
    The findings were that Chest compression only CPR is effective for a limited period only (less than 5 minutes) and is not recommended as the standard management of out-of hospital cardiac arrest. 61-80% of your time spent on chest compression is more effective than 80- 100%. if you aim for a rate of 90- 120 Compressions per minute with a 5cm depth.
    2010 UK Guidelines here
    ERC 2010 guidelines videos here (BLS video deals with ventilations.)
    Findings of International Liason comittee on resuscitation
    and here
     
  8. b.s.

    b.s. Loaded Pockets

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    Lot's of good information here. Thanks to everybody for their responses.

    b.s.
     
  9. JIM

    JIM Loaded Pockets

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    Just blow harder..