1. Are you a current member with account or password issues?

    Please visit following page for more information

    Dismiss Notice

Citizen Skyhawk Accuracy

Discussion in 'Watches' started by bquinlan, Nov 18, 2009.

  1. bquinlan

    bquinlan Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2006
    Messages:
    669
    Likes Received:
    73
    Can electronic watches "learn" to be more accurate over time? When I first got my Citizen Skyhawk Titanium my rough estimate was that it was losing 12-15 seconds per year. Which was very good. :)

    Since I got my Casio PAW-1300 it has pretty much stayed on my wrist except for very rare dress occasions. Yesterday I pulled it out of the window for the first time in just over a year. It had lost less than 3 seconds in that time. Which is more than very good. ;D

    I am delighted, but can anyone explain the improvement in accuracy?

    --Bob Q
     
  2. Valerian

    Valerian Tea-powered admin

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,266
    Likes Received:
    2,018
    I'm not a watch expert, but I think so. When I bought my Citizen Ecodrive (basic quartz analog watch), I was initially disappointed with its accuracy, it would gain about a second per week. But now, a couple of years later, it has settled down and seems to keep very good time. It still runs a bit fast, but so little that I haven't even checked how much.
     
  3. photomic

    photomic Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2006
    Messages:
    433
    Likes Received:
    4
    it's the wrist heat.
    Seriously.

    when the watch it's on your wrist it stays at an higher temperature than when it's off,
    this affect the lubricants inside, as well the metal parts and even the quartz oscillator.
     
  4. bquinlan

    bquinlan Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2006
    Messages:
    669
    Likes Received:
    73
    Normally that would make perfect sense to me, but in this case I'm not so sure... The Skyhawk actually has a built-in thermocouple that allows it to compensate for temperature variations.

    Now I want to put it under a heat lamp for a few months and see what happens. :laugh:

    --Bob Q
     
  5. Denix

    Denix Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2006
    Messages:
    107
    Likes Received:
    9
    I'm always amazed at the Skyhawk accuracy. Mine loses about 9 seconds per year and has been consistent since I got it 4 years ago. By the way Bob, you're the one who convinced me to buy it when I was asking for advice at that time :) Thank you for convincing me to get a great watch O0

    Guy
     
  6. bquinlan

    bquinlan Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2006
    Messages:
    669
    Likes Received:
    73
    I'm glad you're enjoying yours as much as I am mine!

    --Bob Q
     
  7. Gatsby

    Gatsby Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2006
    Messages:
    272
    Likes Received:
    19
    Well my Skyhawk AT continues to be really accurate - seems to lose about zero seconds a week! :D

    I am mostly a mechanical watch guy but solar/radio controlled watches have completely won me over - I have three of them and all are marvels of efficiency.

    Still - my old Ti Skyhawk was pretty darn accurate - I don't remember the actual figures but I never worried about it being far off.
     
  8. Phaeton

    Phaeton Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    May 22, 2007
    Messages:
    131
    Likes Received:
    4
    Any watch that has the radio update feature should appear to be remarkably accurate. As long at is in a position to receive the signal it will update every night. You should observe virtually no deviation when observed on a daily basis.

    I have a Casio Waveceptor that I use as my "master" timekeeper. It updates itself nightly and I set my other watches and clocks by it.

    As always, when checking for deviation on your watch, the source used is really the most important element. A time signal updated watch is probably the best source.

    Mark