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Build your own or purchase a kit

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by bigant2984, Mar 22, 2017.

  1. Chris_1001

    Chris_1001 Loaded Pockets

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    I have one of each, built kit and purchased kit. Both are blowout style. And are identical in the contents.

    For a boo boo kit, I think you could easily buy a basic kit then add stuff to it to get the best of both worlds
     
  2. Adam Ng

    Adam Ng Loaded Pockets

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    Buy a kit that fit your size requirement. From that you can switch out and double up items that you need more. Modify as you use. Basic Items like case, tweezer, scissors if purchase separately would cost the same as a packaged kit anyway.
     
  3. Russ Prechtl
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    Russ Prechtl EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    I'm pretty much with everyone else - it depends on your level of training and what you are licensed/certified to do.

    If you're starting out and need general stuff, a prepared kit is a nice way to go. As your level of training increases, that's when you will want to put together your own so you can get more specific items to meet your needs. Example - What thickness nitrile gloves do you need? If you are holding direct pressure on a wound with a 4x4 as a basic provider, basic nitrile medical gloves should meet your needs very nicely. If you are doing more invasive hands-on treatments (such as starting IVs on trauma patients), then you may want thicker high-risk gloves for those bloodier times. Only your training will prepare you for what you need versus buying a bunch of stuff you may or may not ever use.
     
    bigant2984 and CodeBru1984 like this.
  4. bakpackr

    bakpackr Loaded Pockets

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    I always favor build your own as it is usually cheaper and you can customize for your specific needs. Tourniquet is a must have for anything over a basic Band-Aid first aid kit, every police and military unit is training extensively in their use for a reason
     
    bigant2984 likes this.
  5. ac7ss
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    • The Omnia Paratus

    ac7ss Loaded Pockets

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    I thought I would post what I carry when I am working in the field (some rough neighborhoods):
    [​IMG]
    It's not exactly small, but had what one would need to keep someone alive for the immediate time.
    Clockwise from top:
    • 5.11 bag to hold it all
    • TQ
    • QK
    • Trauma bandage
    • Leatherman Surge
    • Extra blades for Surge
    Yes, it's bulky, but is enough supplies to maintain a GSW or MVA victim until aid arrives.

    I hope I never have to use it.

    The field truck and each train contains the basic OSHA kit if I just need boo boo items.
     
    bigant2984 likes this.
  6. thegrouch314

    thegrouch314 Loaded Pockets

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    An issue I have with premade kits is the gloves. I have very small hands so I always have to swap out the gloves. I've probably got a dozen or so packs that came with packs that are useless to me because they're far too big :happy:
     
  7. DCBman

    DCBman Loaded Pockets

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    Build my own, absolutely. However, as a former EMT (not current) I pretty much know what I want / need in a FAK. Though most can figure this out with a little training and some research (training is always a good thing). I have vastly different FAK's depending on what I'm doing. The one in one bag will be different from the one in another bag because the bags have different purposes. The one in my office will be different from the one at home (the one at home is really more of a complete trauma set up, but it doesn't have to move far).

    I think the biggest issue for me is quality. Pre-made FAK's usually have crappy components in them. Yeah, they all have bandaids, but they're probably the cheapest crappiest stuff they can find, and the same goes for all the rest of the supplies (i.e the tape sucks, the bandages suck...most everything sucks, and most of it is imported from China and other places). You'll rarely find pre-stocked FAK's with quality components, they all stock them with crap to optimize profits.

    Try this test...pull a simple bandaid out of your pre-made FAK and stick it on your finger. Take a good quality brand name (medical supply) bandaid and put it on another finger. Then go about your daily business. See which one lasts longer. Hint: it won't take more than a few minutes to complete this test. Now think about how every other thing in that pre-made kit is the exact same level of quality. Guess what, then you too will be building your own FAK, trust me.
     
  8. SOS24

    SOS24 Loaded Pockets

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    I have bought a few kits, but always found I was adding to it, taking stuff out or the pouch wasn't what I wanted. Now I tend to purchase items separately or if I find a good refill kit then pack in my own bag. This way I can also use stuff to make a home fak, one for my get home or BOB, and small ones for pocket organizer.
     
  9. Batsy

    Batsy Loaded Pockets

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    So, a lot of people are upset with the whole stick and rag comment. While I understand the importance of a tourniquet, I also do not carry one with my EDC. I have one with my IFAK and one in my truck medical kit, but not my daily bag. This is primarily because my medical kit is based on daily surroundings specific to my routine. While they certainly have the ability to save lives, so does a defibrillator. An emergency tracheotomy or mouth to mouth CPR kit actually makes more sense to be in my bag than the TQ being that I'm in an office atmosphere majority of the week. At the end of the day everybody is entitled to their opinion or preference based on their specific situation.

    Long story short, I have a very basic kit and make a point to use higher quality items versus knock off. Quikclot or an Israeli bandage would probably be my most important addition.
     
    DCBman likes this.
  10. Swe_Nurse

    Swe_Nurse Loaded Pockets

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    First of all I don't see too many people that are "upset". Secondly the discussion is not about whether anyone carries (or should carry) a tourniquet or not (or where/when). It's about a blatantly wrong assumption that an improvised tourniquet ("stick and rag") is just as good, therefore there's no need to carry one.

    This is about as correct as saying "I don't carry aspirin, I carry Ibuprofen. Both works for pain and heart attacks".

    Personally I see a quite a few people on here and in other places that shouldn't be carrying a tourniquet, the comments they make makes it obvious that they lack both the training and the mindset to ever use one safely and effectively. Comments such as "It's only for last resort with traumatic amputations" or "write the time so it can be loosened every 20 minutes".
     
    Batsy likes this.
  11. Batsy

    Batsy Loaded Pockets

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    You nailed it regarding ability of most to safely and effectively use one. My post was more justifying why it's not realistic for my situation and why it isn't in my kit... in response to another member looking for an opinion.
     
    Swe_Nurse likes this.
  12. 01bugtruck

    01bugtruck Loaded Pockets

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    Build your own, it will be specific for your needs & abilities.

    I carry a tiny boo-boo kit, has a few band aids, a few alcohol pads and a pack of steri-strips.

    I have zero medical training so a tourniquet and other advanced devices/materials are worthless to me.
     
  13. thekapow

    thekapow EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    I recomend you buy a pre assembled kit to get a good foundation, if you are a newbie this is a great way to start. As you go along you find out there is stuff you dont really need and you find things you want to add (israeli bandage, TQ, chest seals etc). As your needs grow (they will) you might ditch the pouch the kit came with and move the stuff + aditional content to a new pouch of your preference further down the road.
     
  14. ac7ss
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    ac7ss Loaded Pockets

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    REI has a few small emergency kits that are great for EDC. From pocket to small pack carry.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900AZ using Tapatalk