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Best Stove for Emergency Kit?

Discussion in 'General EDC Discussion' started by SpyderPrepper, Nov 9, 2013.

  1. CatherineM
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    CatherineM Loaded Pockets

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    We've got a two burner Coleman, an alcohol, and several pyromids. In a pinch, I'll burn my old law books. I'd live to have a fireplace, but we live in a condo.


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  2. netcat

    netcat Loaded Pockets

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    For outdoors, there are two options for me

    Bushcraft Essentials' Bushbox



    A foldable hobo made auf stainless steel. When collapsed, it is about 3.55x4.53" and about 0.15" in height and weighs about 9 ounces. It comes with a pan rest and a pack sack.

    Besides the possibility to fuel it with kindling wood, you can also use it with esbit or as a windscreen for an alcohol stove. Works great with canteens and SS bottles.

    It's pros for me: small yet not too lightweight, stable, easy to clean, well thought out and does not cost too much. And you can find kindling literally everywhere.

    Biolite's CampStove



    Together with CattlePot of the company, you have a cooking system plus a charger for your USB devices which is independent of sunlight. What more can I say? ;)


    --
    Urban EDC philosophy: Getting things done for yourself and others.
     
  3. snowkiwi
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    snowkiwi EDC Junkiwi

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    I have a few redundancy systems I use. In a huge old backpack
    I use as an INCH bag I have a family sized trangia simple meths ethanol type stove similar to this. I have used this 100s of times for years hiking camping etc. tried it with petrol kero it handles most burn able fuels. Some burn dirty but good for emergency.
    [​IMG]

    These are smaller 1-2man use.

    Boil , cook , charge USB gear. Uses forage able fuel - wood. Bio lite.
    [​IMG][​IMG]


    To boil water simple cheap ($8) dual mix gas stove
    [​IMG][​IMG]





    Haphazardly ejected from my APPLE using Tapatalk

    (APPLE: Annoyingly Perfect Pathologically Likeable Electronics)
     
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  4. Dr Jekell
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    Dr Jekell I had fun once, It was awful.
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    I will try to see if I still have the site still bookmarked but it has been a while since I last looked.

    Edit: sorry looks like I got it mixed up with one of the MSR backpacking models.
     
    Last edited by Dr Jekell, Nov 12, 2013
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  5. snowkiwi
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    snowkiwi EDC Junkiwi

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    +1 Got the same one in my Pic above. Works very well for the price. Used twice. I just keep it for emergency and will hopefully never need it
     
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  6. Dr Jekell
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    Dr Jekell I had fun once, It was awful.
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    Liquid fuels in a properly closed container are actually very safe and more space efficient than canisters.

    You may also want to look at the C&C for your apartment and any local fire laws before stockpiling gas canisters.
     
  7. batteur
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    I have the EDCBox which has the dimensions of a credit card and is ~7 mm thick. Can place a tea light in there or small pieces of wood. In a bowl like an empty tea light tin I can use sterno or other liquid stuff, too.
     
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  8. graham_s
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    Hexamine fumes are poisonous, so no.
    I'd only use it in a well ventilated area.
     
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  9. Nick4305
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    Nick4305 EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Have still to try this, but friends say that as portable wood stove it's pretty good, even if a little too much heavy.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Bought one year ago. No more available, i see.
    Nick
     
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  10. graham_s
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    graham_s Loaded Pockets

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    I have one of those, they're quite good little wood burners.
    I tend to run mine on pinecones.
     
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  11. Nick4305
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    Nick4305 EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    I'm a great fan of wood and natural fuel as bark or cones, instead of chemical/petroleum-based fuels.
    I'm actually using a DIY foldable similar stove, but more squared and higher.
    Measures were taken to easily fit a 1,5 lt Zebra BillyCan.
    Works very well even in low/medium wind.
    Nick
     
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  12. netcat

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    Was close to make one myself, but then I came across the CampStove. ;) I have to admit that I like listening to music sometimes. Sometimes I even have my iPad with me for writing, :)


    --
    Urban EDC philosophy: Getting things done for yourself and others.
     
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  13. Jon O

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    Another vote for the esbit pocket stoves!
     
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  14. Monocrom

    Monocrom Loaded Pockets

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    I also have a kidney-shaped Emergency stove designed to fit the bottom portion of a traditional G.I. Canteen. Best part is, you can still use the traditional metal canteen-cup with it too. Don't have to choose between one or the other carried on the bottom of the canteen. Works like a short, form-fitted, Hobo stove. Fuel is basically any natural tinder that you stuff underneath it.
     
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  15. TarHeelBrit
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    TarHeelBrit Loaded Pockets

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    You asked for it.:D

    Folding Firebox multifuel stove.

    [​IMG]

    Esbit cookset. And the ubiquitous Esbit folding stove.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I have two alcohol stoves one boil and one simmer the only difference is that the simmer has half the amount of holes for a slow cook
    [​IMG]
     
  16. TarHeelBrit
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    TarHeelBrit Loaded Pockets

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    Something like this?
    [​IMG]
    How does it work for you any experience? I've been looking at one to go with my 1Ltr metal cup and canteen.
     
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  17. graham_s
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    graham_s Loaded Pockets

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    There is a slightly larger esbit cookset that has a trangia style burner under it.
    [​IMG]

    It runs on meths or fuel tabs.
     
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  18. sungame

    sungame Loaded Pockets

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    What would be the best stove in an emergency is not a simple question. The answer depends on what sort of emergency you find yourself in, where this takes place, for how long the emergency lasts, how many people the stove will have to support and how and for how far you will have to transport the stove and fuel. Plus probably a gazillion other variables I haven't even thought of.

    There is probably no single stove that excels in all situations. Neither is there one perfect fuel.

    As far as I know, this is true. Kerosene, for example, doesn't evaporate very easily. Therefore, it doesn't ignite all that easily by accident either. Until 15-20 years ago, many Norwegian homes were heated by kerosene burners. Quite a few still are. I grew up in one of these homes, and lived for a year in another one. I would say that you could safely store 1-3 drums (200-600 liters) of kerosene in your backyard, and at least a couple of liters indoors.

    Also, kerosene provides more energy per weight unit than either propane or ethanol. That means a rather small amount can last for a long time. However, it does give off some rather nasty fumes when it burns, and I would be wary about using it indoors, at least without very good ventilation.

    For indoor cooking, I believe the only good option is propane, although ethanol might also work in a proper burner. Propane, after all, is used daily in kitchens all over the world. However, it does have its drawbacks. Storing huge amounts of propane is not as safe as storing kerosene. Also, it gives you a lot less energy per weight unit. That means you will need more of it - both in weight and volume - to provide the necessary amount of heat. That might not be a huge problem if you have enough space and can shelter in place, but it will be a huge pain in the back if you have to hike any real distance. Last, propane burners can be tricky in very cold conditions. In my experience, they can be rather hard to light in below - 10 Celcius.

    All this means your ideal choice is not to choose. Go for both fuels! There are two ways to accomplish this:

    1. If you have the space, and are allowed to install a propane grill, and can cook outside, on a balcony, porch or patio, do that. A full size canister will last a looooong time, even if you use the grill for all your cooking needs. If you have an outhouse or similar, you could even store a spare canister there. Then, get a portable kerosene or white gas burner of some sort. MSR, Primus, Optimus and others make good ones, even if they are not exactly dirt cheap. I don't know about the states, but over here, you can also buy used army stoves (Optimus 111) rather cheaply. They might not be the lightest stoves around, but they are compact and easy to pack. A couple of liters of kerosene will last for quite some time.
    2. If 1 isn't an option, get some sort of multi fuel burner (with a propane adaptor if needed). Store one or two propane canisters and 1-3 liters of kerosene. That way, you can use the propane indoors, and swap to kerosene if you have to travel. Also, the kerosene option will be very useful if you will use the stove for camping or hiking. MSR have a reputation for making very good multi fuel burners, although I do not have any personal experience with them. I have used a Primis Omnifuel for years, and even though I originally got a lemon, I have to say that this is a really good stove. Out of the box, it will burn whitegas, kerosene, gasoline, diesel or propane, even though you will have to swap nozzles when changing fuel type. It is incredibly fast and efficient (at least on whitegas and kerosene, I've never tried it on propane), and regulating the flame is rather easy. The only drawbacks are that it is expensive, and that it takes a bit of time to learn how to use.
    The two options above are what I see as ideal solutions. However, I am a firm believer in the "something is better than nothing" approach, both when it comes to EDC and more "preppy" topics. I also believe that in most civilized, western urban areas, any emergency leading to total loss of power is likely to of a rather short duration (less than a week in most cases). While the approach mentioned above will give you slightly better odds in a more extreme emergency, I think a simple Trangia stove or cheap propane burner will probably get you through most realistic emergencies. If you live in a hurricane or earth quake prone location, or far from the nearest town, however, things may be quite different.
     
    Last edited by sungame, Nov 15, 2013
  19. Monocrom

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    Yup, but the top of mine is covered with metal too and is actually perferrated with tiny holes. Makes it stronger and easier to use. Works well as a short-height Hobo stove.
     
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  20. runcible68

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    I have an Esbit Stove in my BOB . Very inexpensive and effective. I tested it by heating up a can of chili in my canteen cup.

    Do not mess with those tiny alcohol stoves! I bought one and it couldn't support the weight of even a titanium cup, the :censored: denatured alcohol is dangerous and messy and storing the fuel in your BOB risks leakage and disaster. Esbits are basically idiot proof. Just use the in a well ventilated space.


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