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Backpacking multitool?

Discussion in 'MultiTools and Other Pocket Tools' started by EDCSteve, Sep 30, 2013.

  1. SAKplumber
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    SAKplumber EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Imo, the Topeak is better because the bits can't slip out the backside. I like the Leatherman bit cards becase of their smal package yet large amount of versatility. They do stick through the Topeak ratchet, so you can't put your thumb on the back of it, but they can't be used at all with the Vic ratchet because without your thumb, The'll slide right through.
     
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  2. Narcosynthesis

    Narcosynthesis Loaded Pockets

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    I guess the big question is how important is weight versus function, and what functions exactly do you need?

    You will get the best range of features with a standard size multitool (spirit, wave, rebar, etc) but that will be at the expense of more weight to carry, especially if you don't want most of the tools (scissors? can openers? saws?)

    If all you really want is a blade and pliers then the Leatherman skeletool and freestyle are decent options - fairly bare bones and without any extra tools, but less weight to carry.

    If you can do without the pliers then a SAK would be a superb choice - available in variants to suit pretty much any choice of tools, and are much lighter and smaller than a multitool.

    If you are intending to do any survival or hunting style trips though, I would definitely recommend looking into a good fixed blade - you can spend as much as you like, but even something as cheap as a basic Mora knife will be tougher, more reliable and far easier to clean than a multitool (ever tried cleaning out the mess stuck inside a tool after gutting an animal?).
     
  3. patrat

    patrat Loaded Pockets

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    I go to my Leatherman Squirt PS4 for backpacking use. Feel free to add a lightweight fixed blade, like a mora. You still come out lighter than a full size MT, with all the utility needed. No saw/axe is really needed, deadfall collection and breaking thumb size sticks is sufficient.

    This is for backpacking mind, not bushcraft.
     
  4. JP

    JP Loaded Pockets

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    Skeletool plus Leatherman Micra.I find them to be a good Combo.

    Depends on where you are headed and for how long but a hatchet and a folding saw (bahco) could be worth the additional weight if they will be used.
     
  5. swany66675
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    swany66675 Loaded Pockets

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    Forgot I keep a micro in my bag to, for the tweezers, and small eyeglasses screwdriver.

    The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep,
    And miles to go before I sleep.
     
  6. Sriracha

    Sriracha Loaded Pockets

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    One of the regular or Alox SAK will fit the bill. The OHT is a great suggestion. If weight is paramount... why do you need pliers? And don't pound tent stakes with your only tool. I would buy a SAK Farmer. Lanyard ring so you dont loose it, saw, good size blade for food/game, as far as defense, whittle yourself a good walking stick. The awl is perfect for making holes in tarps,wood,clearing jets,etc. The can opener can also be used to grab the wire handle on hot pots (unless you get a celidor SAK, then you can use the cool hook tool to do that!). Personally, I would carry a Mora and a folding camp saw, but I am not a lightweight type of guy. Good luck.
     
  7. metropolicity

    metropolicity Loaded Pockets

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    You ever try to take 2 litres of boiling water off a jet stove or a fire? haha, pliers are good for a lot of things! If the cutters are sharp, they make for cutting sticks cleanly better than a saw. Either way, for a similar size and shape (relative to other camping tools) I'd rather HAVE pliers than stick with a SAK, also majority of the tools mentioned have locking implements and when I am out in the woods either by myself or with one or two people, safety is paramount as medical services is usually a couple of hours away.

    However, to each their own :)
     
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  8. Sriracha

    Sriracha Loaded Pockets

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    Another question... What screws need to be driven or ratcheted in the middle of the woods? I would focus on the blade/saw combo... everything else I think just adds weight.
     
  9. swany66675
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    swany66675 Loaded Pockets

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    To unscrew the bottom of most stoves to replace o-rings if they burn out.

    The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep,
    And miles to go before I sleep.
     
  10. Sriracha

    Sriracha Loaded Pockets

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    I see. What type of screw? Would a combo-tool work? Because I am changing my answer to Swiss Bianco Lumberjack. Everything you need, nothing you dont. As far as the Metro posed question about removing 2 quarts of boiling water... I have used the hook and can opener many times to move pots around on a fire, and a coleman stove. I also usually have a "camp rag" in my kit to wipe things down and to use as an oven mitt. I find the really thick terrycloth "grill cloths" work well. Befriend someone who works at a fast food joint, they are so useful.
     
  11. Sriracha

    Sriracha Loaded Pockets

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    I cant edit for some reason. Quarts/ Liters, Metro... more like Metric! PSSSSHHHHH! ;)
     
  12. metropolicity

    metropolicity Loaded Pockets

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    You do know that metric is more accurate right? ;)
     
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  13. Sriracha

    Sriracha Loaded Pockets

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    Totally, just breaking your chops. It makes much,much,much more sense. Just a jingoistic jab at you!;) Hey, at least Canadians drive on the RIGHT side!;)
     
  14. swany66675
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    swany66675 Loaded Pockets

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    I carried a SAK for years I think it was an Adventurer??? it was great had a scout symbol on it and was locking. I also carried a pot lifter (basically a specialty pliers) a lot of the pots made for light weight backpacking don't have a handle or a metal loop basically just a canister smooth all the way around. I had loaned them out, while at a hostile and they never returned. The skeletool does both jobs okay, has a little more curve to the blade then anything else listed important if skinning may be a real option.
     
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  15. Jascha

    Jascha Empty Pockets

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    I am an avid Ultralight Backpacker and carry a Baladeo 37 gram knife, razor blade in homemade cardboard sleeve, and if needed a hand wire saw. Along with a simple flint fire starter to light my alcohol stove. If in an area where I need defense I carry bear spray. Don't think a multi-tool is going to defend against much. :) For tent stakes I find a rock or sturdy branch works to drive them in if stubborn.
     
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  16. theilluminator

    theilluminator Empty Pockets

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    I'd say look at some of the more compact leathermans and buy a small fixed blade
     
  17. Ibrahim Sarp Dogan

    Ibrahim Sarp Dogan Loaded Pockets

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    my favourite combo too, enough for almost everything.take a big folder (like endura) or a hatchet according to situations.

    [​IMG]
     
  18. Arthur St.James

    Arthur St.James Empty Pockets

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    For a few bucks extra just go with a Leatherman wave, one of the all time great tools. It's not super small or anything, but it is handy, portable and for what you get, amazing. Don't ever skimp on any tool.
     
  19. microbe

    microbe EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Nope, I am not a hunter, but even if I use my Skeletool to cut some Chorizo, I have to clean out the small holes in the blade. :)
     
  20. Swe_Nurse

    Swe_Nurse Loaded Pockets

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    With the needs you describe it sounds like a proper fixed blade or a small hatchet will fulfill all of them better than any multi tool. The exception is the pot holding and that can easily be improvised in a number of ways. What makes you gravitate towards a multi tool?

    Besides, if by deep woods you mean something like our primary forest up here in Scandinavia you would have to be either crazy or very (over)confident in your abilities to carry nothing but the blade on a multi tool for 50 bucks this time of the year, not to mention the situation two months from now. Down here were I live you may get away with it as you will be quite close to the civilization most of the time. Further north, the North American or eastern European forests may very well kill you for a stunt like carrying a flimsy knife. Sure, if everything works out ok you will probably be ok with it. But winter woodlands are infamous for not being very cooperative, the wrong turn, a blizzard or a misstep is all it takes to turn a leisurely walk into a survival situation. I've been trekking the woods around here my entire life in one way or the other and while I do bring a multi tool most of the time I would never willingly rely on it as my primary knife.

    If by deep woods you mean path trekking during the warmer months you can get away with carrying a SAK or a Leatherman Juice or similar tool. Then a smaller Leatherman would be my suggestion, the discontinued sideclip could work out well.
     
    Last edited by Swe_Nurse, Oct 5, 2013
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