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anyone here use linux???

Discussion in 'Electronic Devices' started by jake.t, May 23, 2009.

  1. Atomic

    Atomic Loaded Pockets

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    I've been using Linux for around 6 years. I started out with Slackware. After some time with Slackware I was a fairly competent "user" but far from a developer. So dependency after dependency while trying to install some program plus them talking about not supporting Gnome I decided to switch to Archlinux. It was great, but Ubuntu is the perfect distro. That's what I use a lot. I recently purchased a new PC with Vista on it and don't use Linux as my primary OS. Cedega is good but it's not like playing the games on the OS they were designed for.
     
  2. houdini28

    houdini28 Loaded Pockets

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    I just switched a week or so ago from 8.04 Hardy Heron to 9.10 Karmic Koala. I am amazed by how well everything is working right out of the box. I have a tablet laptop and with 8.04 I had to search in order to get the screen to change orientation, and for the pen and tablet to work. I had other things to work out as well like WiFi. With 9.10, I haven't had to do anything. It all worked. I was pleasantly surprised.
     
  3. Narcosynthesis

    Narcosynthesis Loaded Pockets

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    After hearing from lots of happy linux users over the years I have never really seen the point in using it so far myself, so perhaps some of you chaps can educate me somewhat...

    I am currently using Snow Leopard on a macbook and am completely happy with it - nicer to use for me than windows, and does pretty much everything I need of it - internet (safari), music (itunes), video (vlc), and image processing (aperture) and all in a happy and easy to use manner. For a relatively non computer savvy person, is there any reason to bother with using linux or dual booting it on my mac? As far as I have gathered, you lose compatibility with most mainstream software (admittedly the mac loses a fair amount of windows stuff, but is mainstream enough to have everything I need) and I just don't really see what the huge benefit is. Would I see the same as I did when I changed from windows to mac? or is it mostly used in the realm of programmers who can set everything up to whatever specs they like rather than sticking to the easy to use stuff?

    I should just say I don't mean this as an attack in the vein of 'why would anyone bother with linux', but I am genuinely interested if it has any merits for a more mainstream user...
     
  4. zenlunatic

    zenlunatic Loaded Pockets

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    Just signed up for one of my Spring classes: Redhat Linux network security. Can't wait. Going RHCE summer 2010 wooh!
     
  5. houdini28

    houdini28 Loaded Pockets

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    I am not a computer expert, so I cannot say with any certainty any specific benefits of using Linux over any other OS. The main reason why I tried Linux was because I like to tinker with things and eventually I decided to experiment with different operating systems. One of the reasons why I like Linux is because it breathe new life into computers. My parents have an old Dell Laptop which perpetually started up into a blue screen of death. After installing Linux Mint, they now have a laptop which runs without issue.

    There is a facet of customizability in using Linux. For example, the amount and variety of software freely available for Linux is unparalleled. Some of the software is amazing and some of it lackluster, but that seems to be par for the course. Moreover, if you have the coding chops, you can create your own programs or applets. While Linux does not have programs like iTunes, it does have VLC and Rhythmbox to fill in.

    The only problems I have had with my peripheral devices would be my Palm TX. I had to do some research to find an applet to make it sync appropriately. Other than that, everything worked out of the box: printer, scanner, router, etc. My Creative Zen music player is recognized and works with Rhythmbox. I will admit, I much prefer using Creative Zen's software on Windows. It is very simple and makes sense, but it does not work on Linux. Syncing music with Rhythmbox is easy, but it was not specifically created for the device I use.

    Although I have a preference for my OS, I cannot say that there is any advantage to running one OS over another. Whatever OS you have an affinity for would be the one to run. Linux does allow for some fun tinkering and experimenting though. I highly recommend it if you want to learn more about computing.
     
  6. sween1911

    sween1911 Loaded Pockets

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    I run Ubuntu on our home PC (still at 7.04) and I've had great success with it. I'm not really on top of keeping up with new versions mainly because it just works fine the way it is. This was an older HP Pavillion running XP, barely enough to run currently supported versions of Windows, but it chugs along fine running Ubunut. I keep Java and flash up-to-date and Firefox works fine. I VPN into work with a Linux client and can do whatever needs to be done for off-hours support.
     
  7. chavez

    chavez Loaded Pockets

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    In a word "freedom". Freedom to choose. Freedom to change. Freedom to express. Freedom to be open. if you believe in this philosophy then Linux is right there. If you want things to work well with whatever a particular company tells you to then stick with that. Apple products work seamless with other Apple products and are very nice. My officemate is an Apple devotee, signed up for the first iPhone (and is now on the latest one), has a PowerMac and a couple of Apple notebooks. They work brilliantly with each other and the peripherals they are designed to work with.

    I have been working in open source and using Linux for over 10 years now. In the beginning it was a struggle to make a lot of things work. Nowadays, just about anyone without an engineering degree can use Linux easily and just about any device works out of the box. Those that don't, such as some iPods (like the iTouch) are usually due to the restrictions of freedoms and control with no regard for interoperability or openness. Lack of freedom is why a device would lack in working with Linux not due technical limitations. My Samsung phone works great with Linux for example since it uses two standards, bluetooth and the ability to mount the device as USB storage device.

    In another word "stability". My systems stay up for months at a time. I've never had a bad stability issue or security issue though exploits do exist in the Linux world. I watch folks that uses Windows constantly preparing for the latest triojan,virus or whatever exploit is upcoming and hope it doesn't affect any of the servers at work but my own Linux machines are unaffected.
     
  8. zshiner

    zshiner Loaded Pockets

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    Here's another comparison - Web Browsers. It used to be that Microsoft charged for Internet Explorer. There was competition, Netscape emerged, and the prices came down - Ultimately to the point that Browsers became free.

    Competition is good for the marketplace. It spurs innovation, and creativity.

    Today there are multiple free choices. IE comes bundled with Windows. Firefox and Chrome are two others - all free.

    Numerous free OS's are available now. It can only help the consumer.
     
  9. zenlunatic

    zenlunatic Loaded Pockets

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    sween1911,

    I would highly recommend switching to the current Long Term Support (LTS) release which I believe is 8.04. You want the security updates. I dont think Gutsy is still supported.
     
  10. zuixro

    zuixro Loaded Pockets

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    I have 4 Linux computers:
    -Mythbuntu 9.10 Primary Backend/Frontend (P4)
    -Mythbuntu 9.10 Secondary Backend (PIII)
    -Mythbuntu 9.10 Secondary Backend (PIII)
    -Xubuntu PPTP VPN/ Misc server (PIII)

    and 1 BSD computer:
    -Freenas .70R1 (I think) (PIII)

    Mythbuntu is a distribution of Ubuntu that includes DVR software.

    They were all freebies that I put to good use. Total power usage for the whole cluster is about 400w (with a big 17in CRT monitor). I want to get a 23in LCD monitor to use as my TV. That will cut down on the power usage a lot. I'm also going to convert 2 of them to boot from CF cards to speed it up, and to cut down on the power. I have a gigabit switch networking them all, with a total of 500GB of storage distributed across the network (plus my Macbook Pro). I have about 10 days of TV shows recorded. (That's ten continuous days, not 10 days worth of recordings). Total money invested so far? $40. $30 for a dual tuner card, $10 for RAM upgrades.

    Funny note, all of my computers are named after characters from the show "Firefly"

    I used to dual boot OSX/Ubuntu on my Macbook Pro, but when Snow Leopard came out, it didn't play well with Ubuntu, so I deleted it.
     
  11. tso

    tso Loaded Pockets

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    I think you may have the story backwards.

    There where a couple of browsers at first, but they where mostly "proof of concept" written by students while looking into the the http protocol and html file format.

    After some mosaic came into being, and was regarded the best browser. That is until netscape came up with the navigator. Basically it was mosaic with some netscape-specific ehancements.

    At first, microsoft did not care. They did not even include a tcp/ip stack in windows until win95. And even then it was not installed by default. Instead microsoft tried to one-up AOL, by creating MSN, or MicroSoft Networks.

    But as the web became popular, microsoft made use of their os marketshare to quickly gain the same on the browser side, resulting in internet explorer becoming bundled with later windows releases. At the time, netscape navigator was a shareware program, so that people could use it for 30 days or so but after that was told to register or forced to stop using it.

    Thing is tho, neither netscape nor microsoft was in any ways a saint. Both where pushing their own take on how html should be interpreted for presentation, and introduced tags and features specific for their server-side offerings (yep, netscape sold, and may still sell, webserver software).

    In the end, netscape could not fight microsofts free bundle, and ended up dragging them to court on antitrust, claiming microsoft used one monopoly, windows, to leverage market share in another area, web browsers. Note that this is not the first time microsoft have played this way, as they basically did the same to novell, back when novell netware was the office network solution of choice, but thanks to windows on desktops, microsoft could push exchange and windows server. This was partly novell fault, as they allowed windows to be the official desktop client for netware, not seeing desktop software as important.
     
  12. Bryan76

    Bryan76 Empty Pockets

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    Oh yes. For over 12 years now. I run Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala) on my work desktop, laptop, and home desktop. I also have a Mythbuntu 9.10 box in the living room. Looking into getting a netbook to replace the laptop (more of a EDC item, trying to find the right fit between EDC-ability and large enough keyboard & screen to really use it), and it'll be running ubuntu netbook remix.

    Also have about ten servers running ubuntu or redhat at work.
     
  13. kirbysdl
    • In Omnia Paratus

    kirbysdl Loaded Pockets

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    Wow, first post is a Linux thing!   :welcome:

    Do you do Ubuntu/RHEL (for work servers)?  I would have thought Ubuntu/Debian or Fedora/RHEL for ease of administration.  Or do you do that on purpose for heterogeneity (so bugs and exploits are less likely to take you down entirely)? Or ease of getting desired software packages on different machines?
     
  14. ran23
    • In Omnia Paratus

    ran23 Loaded Pockets

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    well, my dual boot board just doesn't boot up anymore. MB errors. Will build another sometime. Until I bought the 1 GB MB, this cost me nothing but spare parts.
     
  15. Double_Tap

    Double_Tap Loaded Pockets

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    Ah, more linux users :)

    Currently using Ubuntu on my laptops/desktop machines (with Win in a VM for a few administrative tasks).

    Servers are a mix of RHEL/CentOS, Ubuntu, and FreeBSD depending on their tasks.
     
  16. muskrat72

    muskrat72 Loaded Pockets

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    So....how do you get the sound to work?
     
  17. phatch

    phatch Loaded Pockets

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    Sound, well that depends on your flavor of linux and your particular sound card. If you're using onboard sound on a major manufacturer of etiher motherboards (asus) or PCS (dell, HP) you usually get sound support on installation of linux, if you're using one of the major types of linux (debian, ubuntu fedora).

    If you're using a Creative Sound card, creative offers a driver that has helped many in the past: http://opensource.creative.com/soundcard.html but is usually bundled in most distros now as I understand it.

    Most distributions of linux offer a supoprted hardware list. You should check that if you're in doubt of your hardware being supported.

    I should add that you may need to update your BIOS. My current ASUS mobo wouldn't network under linux when I first built the box, but a BIOS update fixed that.
     
  18. tso

    tso Loaded Pockets

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    another thing to consider is that often the sound system on first boot have the main volume both muted and set to zero...