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Any suggestions to improve punches of speed?

Discussion in 'Personal Security Devices & Self-Defense' started by AcesQ, Jan 21, 2010.

  1. AcesQ

    AcesQ Loaded Pockets

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    I'd been practicing Tkd over a couple of years, and i had been doing kickings all along, so i wanted to do some exercises to train up my punches. Is there any form of exercises / drills that you guys would suggest to increase the firing speed of my punches?
     
  2. 2506sniper

    2506sniper Loaded Pockets

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    Well, as for speed, thats something you have to practice at. But some advice I can give you is something bruce lee taught. You want to punch so that where they land is approximately 6 inches past the target and SNAP the end. The best punches come straight from the shoulder and drives through your opponent. I practice with 1-2 pound weights. it may not seem like a lot, but I assure, once you do that for a while, and then punch empty handed, you will notice a remarkable difference in speed and power.

    so in review. Drive your Punches straight from the shoulder, focus your impact point past your intended target, and snap your fist at the end. I sparr with a lot of big guys,(which I am not), and they refer to my punches as "knock your block off" punches
     
  3. swiftness

    swiftness Loaded Pockets

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    Shadowbox with weights, hit the speed bag and double end bag, and clap pushups
     
  4. AcesQ

    AcesQ Loaded Pockets

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    Mm, i like the idea of clap pushups. =) Thanks for the both replies.
     
  5. swiftness

    swiftness Loaded Pockets

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    Yeah the weights help alot too..Makes your hands lightning fast cause they are used to striking with heavier hands. When I was a teenager I ordered this video called "Beyond Speed minimizing reflex and reaction time" It had a lot of exercises that helped with my reaction time but not my handspeed to much.
     
  6. Joe Talmadge

    Joe Talmadge Loaded Pockets

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    There are interesting lessons from world class sprinters here. One of the things they do is equivalent to shadowboxing w/ light weights ... that is, they'll sprint with a parachute to increase the load. In both cases, the greater load causes some minor muscular development, but much more importantly, it causes the CNS to try to adapt to the greater load by firing off more motor units and it fires them off more simultaneously. This, the ability for your CNS to fire off motor units as close to simultaneously as possible while under only light load, is what determines speed. You feel lighter and faster after you drop the weights because your CNS is firing off more more units at the same time. The effect only lasts for a little while (you'll feel it more within 60 seconds of dropping the weights, much less a few hours later), but if you do this often enough, your CNS will wire in those pathways permanently -- that is, you will (as long as you continue training) permanently increase your ability to fire off more muscle units in a more coordinated fashion for that particular movement (which is why this exercise should be primary, and clap pushups and other non-sport-specific movements secondary). Keep the weights *light*, it does not take much to reap the gains, plus bigger weights put your joints at greater risk, and you start shifting emphasis from speed to power as you go up in weight.

    But sprinters also do the opposite -- they do drills where they lighten the load by running down a slight grade or with the wind at their backs. That teaches the CNS how to fire more quickly in succession -- that is, in re-defines the limit of speed. You can simulate this by, if you usually spar in 16 oz. gloves, sometimes hitting the bags with 8oz. gloves and working specifically on speed.

    Obviously, all this has to be taken in context. Your opponent might perceive you as being lightning fast when you are in actuality just putting everything together well -- timing, distance, etc. I once sparred with someone who was telegraphing a little bit, and as a result whenever he tried to hit me I evaded and hit him instead. He perceived me as being lightning fast in my reaction to his strike and then taking advantage of his microsecond of vulnerability to hit him. I convinced him nothing of the sort was happening when I slowed my strike down to 75% (so it was obviously slow) and still hit him each time. Whatever you do, make sure putting it all together is part of your strategy.
     
  7. iomatic

    iomatic Loaded Pockets

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    Besides boxing, Karate is all about punching (and everything that is associated with it; not limited to, but including stance, hip-rotation, power, form, proper technique, etc.), and of course, the other stuff.
     
  8. onami

    onami Empty Pockets

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    try training with resistance bands, just shadow box, they work with your bodys action whilst providing resistance, also learn to relax the muscles, tension decreases speed
     
  9. Joe Talmadge

    Joe Talmadge Loaded Pockets

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    I should add that, aside from sparring itself, I think the focus mitts are the next best tool. The targets are relatively small, moving, and not always perfectly in the right position, which means you have to solve some practical problems as you punch. And better yet, there's a guy holding the mitts who can yell at you when you start sacrificing power for speed -- you want speed with power, not to be the fastest slap-fighter, so this is critical feedback.
     
  10. iomatic

    iomatic Loaded Pockets

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    I guess that's my point, in the end (but don't take my advice if you don't want it, obviously): I'd rather deliver one strong, decisive blow that ends it all, versus trying to pummel someone into submission with a number of weak punches. Not that that technique isn't useful (Wing Chun)! It's all good; just depends on what you want to accomplish.
     
  11. Lord Bear

    Lord Bear Loaded Pockets

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    Torque. Car mechanics who unscrew bolts without wrench, fencing masters with overdeveloped wrists. Karate and Taedwondo both stress the rotation of the wrist from knuckles up (at beginning of punch) to knuckles down (at point of impact). (I could be off here as I haven't taken martial arts for many years and tactic/strategy/method of training may have evolved.)
    Robert Heinlein stresses "hit the soft parts with your hand. Hit the hard parts with something hard." (i.e. Not your hands. They are fragile.)
    Kinetic force, can cause major damage to the bones and ligaments in your hand. (There's quite a few.) Some of my younger acquaintances who get into bar fights can knock a man down so he doesn't get up again. They have to go to the doctor to have their hands repaired afterward.
    If punching is part of your tactics, toughen your hand/wrist so impacts can be absorbed properly instead of just increasing the power of your punches. Otherwise pick up something hard.
    Above all practice timing. Whether your hand gets damaged or not, it's no good if your punch doesn't connect properly.
     
  12. Lord Bear

    Lord Bear Loaded Pockets

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    If you're serious about this do handclap pushups. There are two kinds of muscle fiber. Slow steady strong. The other is explosive. If you think it through handclap pushups make perfect sense. Perhaps handsprings bring the point closer to home. But I really must stress the importance of the weakness of the hand in relation to what you punch. From all the way back from elbow>wrist>hand>knuckles...(don't forget fingers)...there are just too many things to go awry.