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Discussion in 'The Breakroom' started by Guarddog, Dec 24, 2008.

  1. JonSidneyB
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    JonSidneyB Uber Prepared
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    A: If we take that question to an extream...well sort of. Oh, I am going to try an answer this to the best of my ability but this is going to come out fuzzy at best.

    While it looks like in special relativity nothing can travel faster than light this is a misconception. If we look outside of matter then maybe kind of sort of.

    There is pulse phase velocity. We have velocity of things in phase as a constant for the collection but if we have different phases we have group speed but the pulse will depend on how the individual parts relate. We can adjust the velocity of the relationship of the phase speed and make it look like pulses are traveling faster than light.

    We can make pulses seem faster than light but I question if it really is but that might be an issue by how we look at it. Pulses can seem faster than light. There have been cases where a sound, or something that has low relative speed to light actually transmitted to a location faster than light. I think it was said in special relativity that information cannot be transmitted faster than the speed of light (don't always meaning information as in text).

    How to illustrate what I think is happening in some of these cases. Lets say you have a stick one light year in length that is ridges and has zero compression in its length. This stick is light enough for you to move easily. There is an object you want to poke one light year plus one inch away. You shove the stick one inch and impact this object. Now you can say that only one inch was covered by on the other hand you initiated this at one light year away. I wonder if the pulse is not only putting a wave though the object but also shoving the object so that the opposite end moves at the same time creating the same pattern that is riding the wave. If this is the case than it can seem that a vibration may have seemed to cover the distance faster than light. If we can make the shove that is faster than the wave occur in a controlled manner than maybe information can be tapped out at the other end faster than light.

    With many things that pulse even light waves we can see this effect. Light entering can seem to have an affect faster at the other end than light speed. I am stuck thinking that it is acting sort of like the very long stick. The influence happens on its entire length at once like poking something with the super long stick.

    Is this what your question is getting at?


    Question: Can ice be made without the crystallizationhappening process?
     
  2. yam350

    yam350 Loaded Pockets

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    Q. Can water freeze with out the crystallisation process?

    A. Yes it can but the resulting apparent solid is considered a glass, that is a solid with some of the properties of a liquid. Mainly that the molecules are disorganised in a way more similar to a higher energy state also tending to make it tougher than the crystalline version.

    Q.What is the greatest wing span recorded for any flying creature?
     
  3. Valerian

    Valerian Tea-powered admin

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    That was an impressive answer, but what I had in mind was far simpler, a sort of trick question. Speed of light in a medium can be much slower than in vacuum, c/n where n for e.g. water is 1.4, so light travels almost 30% slower through water than in vacuum. It's quite possible to accelerate a particle to a speed faster than that (in water), resulting in an equivalent of a "sonic boom" in the form of UV and blue light. This is called Cherenkov effect and if I've understood correctly, it happens all the time in nuclear reactors.
     
  4. Mr. Henk

    Mr. Henk Empty Pockets

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    A: The South American Teratoron with 25 feet, but the species is dead for over 6 million years. The biggest one alive is a wandering Albatross with the biggest ever recorded being 11 feet and 11 inches.

    Q: Which word (not location or brand name) is the same in Russian, Ukranian, Azerbaijani, Croatian, Czech, Macedonian, Slovak and Svolene?
     
  5. shwa

    shwa Loaded Pockets

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    A: Voda
    Q:Japanese equivalent for FOB in Edo period
     
  6. Valerian

    Valerian Tea-powered admin

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    What's a FOB?
     
  7. DB

    DB Kilted Moderator

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    Perhaps you mean FOP?
     
  8. Mr. Henk

    Mr. Henk Empty Pockets

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    I meant "pivo" but since I can't be sure of voda I suppose it counts.
     
  9. Corporal Punishment

    Corporal Punishment Empty Pockets

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    I was going to guess "chai" (which means you could add a whole bunch more countries to that list also).

    Also, earlier, Valolammas, I thought you might have been looking for a trick answer to your question about "c". I recall about a decade ago, physicists slowed the speed of light down as it passed through a frozen medium a billionth of a degree above absolute zero (the Bose-Einstein Cloud). They made a laser pulse travel as slow as a Volkswagen Bug. So, the answer might be.... a lot of things can go faster than the speed of light (under certain conditions).

    I'm confused about "FOB" also.... "fresh off boat", "freight on board", "forward operating base", a device to hold keys or pocket watch??? Clarification please.

    What do Jimmi Hendrix, Julius Caeser, Mark Twain, Joan of Arc, Jack the Ripper (whoever it was), Napolean Bonaparte, Michaelangelo, Queen Victoria, Bill Clinton and Osama bin Laden have in common?
     
  10. shwa

    shwa Loaded Pockets

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    I find this term in the acronyms and terminology topic so don't blame me - Fob - A short bit of cord or braided lanyard connected to a knife, flashlight, or other tool that goes in your pocket. Often the fob part will be left hanging out of the pocket to facilitate the retrieval of the item to which it is attached.the answer would be sagemono.since Japanese in that era used to wear kimono and they did not have pockets ,other than spaces in the sleeves and their belts which would be used to hold sagemono(bura sageru in Japanese means to hang onto something) in place just like now days belt holsters or pouches.there is different types of sagemon like Inro ,tabaco ire,netsuke,and for me even swords could be put in the same category but im not really sure. all though it'was more artistic,visual and status thing so to speak since they were made out of precious and nice materials,like ivory, mother of pearl,various hard woods ,gold, silver,silk cords etc...still they were heavily used and abused buy most of the casts in feudal Japan.

    Hahaha "pivo" i should have know better.Well i'm non drinker so water "voda" is like pivo to me.
     
  11. phill

    phill Loaded Pockets

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    They were all sinister. I know Hendrix and Osama are/were lefties, i was pretty sure Clinton was and its one of the few things id have guessed could include Jack the Ripper given that list. Solid list, but i got it from two unfortunately. Also, after a quick google its possible Joan of Ark wasnt a lefty, that is an assumption from depictions of her, depictions that could have made her falsely lefty to make her seem more sinister.

    Also, as far as travelling faster than SoL, there are particles that exist that already travel faster than light, however to make a person (or anything of similar mass) travel faster than the speed of light is impossible, there isnt enough energy in the universe to do so (according to Einstein).

    Q, What is most unusual about the age of the galactic empire written about in the beliefs of Scientologists?
     
  12. Guarddog
    • In Omnia Paratus

    Guarddog EDC Junkie !!!!!

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    “Most Unusual” is somewhat subjective allowing the responder to declare what he thinks is the most “Most Unusual”, Having said that I hardly even understand the question but I have done some “minor” reading on the subject in college …

    A. The Galactic Confederacy's history is not revealed to Scientologists until they reach the level of OT III. Once achieving this level, one is informed that Xenu's Galactic Confederacy ruled a broad swath of the galaxy, and lasted for "eighty trillion years". ("The ITSA Line") 75 million years ago, at the time of Xenu's mass murder, the Galactic Confederacy comprised 26 stars and 76 planets, including Earth (then called Teegeeack).

    The Church of Scientology consciously models itself on aspects of the Galactic Confederacy. After the Xenu/Galactic Confederacy story became fully revealed to the public in a court document called the Fishman Affidavit, the Church has sought to keep the information suppressed by claiming any mention of it to be a violation of their copyrighted trade secret. The Fishman Affidavit is a set of court documents submitted by ex-Scientologist Steven Fishman in 1994 containing criticisms of the Church of Scientology and, controversially, substantial portions of the Operating Thetan course materials.


    Q. American singer-songwriter Johnny Cash produced two very successful live albums. One named “Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison” and another named “Johnny Cash at San Quentin”. Did Johnny Cash ever serve a prison sentence?
     
  13. Gene O

    Gene O Empty Pockets

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    A. The Man in Black never served more than single night behind bars, and those were for misdemeanors.


    Q. How many muscicians are in George Thorogoods trio?
     
  14. phill

    phill Loaded Pockets

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    My apologies for not phrasing it better, but the answer which you touched on which i was mainly looking for was the age, given the universe was created by the big bang around 13.7 billion years ago, so the figure of eighty trillion years of existence is most unusual to me.
     
  15. DemskeetSkeet

    DemskeetSkeet Loaded Pockets

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    Q: Who thinks this thread should be changed to: Ask Phill a question!

    Huh!? Who's with me? It seems that Phill has all the right answers!

    Very intelligent fellow!

    Thanks for all you do Phill! ;D
     
  16. Valerian

    Valerian Tea-powered admin

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    A: This is the best answer I could find: "thirty years into this energetic career, George Thorogood is still working with his longtime rhythm section, comprised of bassist Bill Blough and drummer Jeff Simon. Thorogood's screaming slide guitar and howling, gravelly vocals round out the trio." So three, including Thorogood himself.

    Q: I've heard titanium can be brittle in cold. How cold and how brittle are we talking about? Is normal cold weather temperature cold enough or does it require a cryo lab?
     
  17. phill

    phill Loaded Pockets

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    A, It probably wouldnt be as fun.

    Q, Do you think i know all the answers or that i just know a fair amount and am really good at using google and wikipedia :D
     
  18. yam350

    yam350 Loaded Pockets

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    Titanium actually becomes stronger as the temperature drops.

    Q. Has anybody made a gun that shoots round corners?
     
  19. phill

    phill Loaded Pockets

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    Im not too sure about this. Pure Titanium is brittle at room temperature, but becomes malleable at higher temperatures. I cannot find a reference to it becoming more brittle when chilled, and i think, though i may be wrong, someone misinterpreted something they have read about it being brittle when cold. The commercial Ti is only 9

    Im not asking a Q because im not sure if ive answered the question, but like i say i can find to reference to it becoming brittle. In fact i found this:
    http://www.allweathersports.com/winter/winter.html
    which indicates that Ti gets less brittle as it gets cold compared to steel.

    In fact given that space craft are composed of Ti alloy, just how brittle it would get given space is only just hotter than absolute zero is a bit of an indicator that it doesnt get more brittle.

    Anyway, hopefully someone else can shed more light on this Q. Also, i remember from my teen years than apparently Ti is damaged by carbon. If you were to take a paper thin piece of Ti and run a pencil across it, the pencil would cut the Ti sheet in two. If anyone can (dis)prove this id be happy as larry.

    Edit, Yam to the rescue. Fwiw Ti does become more brittle as it get beyond a certain temperature - but its very high and a lot of alloys dont have this property
     
  20. Manatakui

    Manatakui Loaded Pockets

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    A: Actually, yes. There are two examples of which I am familiar, though one is only a technicality. During WWII, Germany developed a barrel attachment for the Stg. 44 (may have popups, I don't know), but the barrel attachment eventually disintegrated over time. The technicality device is the Israeli Cornershot, which incorporates a video camera, and a mount for a variety of weapons, and is actually seen in the movie Eagle Eyes (which, coincidentally is the movie I'm going to watch today).

    Q: Where is a good place to have 58mm SAKs modified? Scibeer only works on larger models. ^^;