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am I sharpening my knives ok?

Discussion in 'Sharpening Stuff -- Stones, Strops, and Systems' started by Emeraldalkaline, Mar 18, 2016.

  1. Emeraldalkaline

    Emeraldalkaline Loaded Pockets

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    Yeah I will definitely purchase a strop along with probably a ultra fine/polishing home for my lansky sharpener. I was just going to get some green buff compound for it. Do you need 2 kinds?

    The lansky should be fine for maintenance needs. I wouldn't have a blade go down to the point where it was in need of like, a full re-grind sharpen. Your poor dragonfly!


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  2. dplafoll

    dplafoll Loaded Pockets

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    I wouldn't say you "need" two kinds, but you're almost certainly going to want a 2-sided(or more) strop. You can leave one side bare leather, and that can be used as well, but I like having two different grits. Just like with sharpening, you strop with the coarser grit(which the black compound is like a 3000 grit IIRC) which helps with burr removal and general sharpness, then go to a finer grit(and I think the green is a 6000 grit) which helps polish the edge.
     
  3. Emeraldalkaline

    Emeraldalkaline Loaded Pockets

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    Do you recommend white/green or black/green?


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  4. chmsam

    chmsam Loaded Pockets

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    You can make a strop. Google it.

    As for sharpening, many folks do it differently. Find what works for you. I've used stones, a Gatco system, a Lansky system, and now I use a WorkSharp belt grinder system. The system that's best is the one that works for you and that you're comfortable using. Not being comfortable means you won't use it as much as you should. The most comfortable system won't do you any good if it can't handle the steel or give you the right bevel.

    Yes, different steels can be a bear to sharpen. Learn what you've got and see how to best take care of it. Make that consideration before you buy a knife and it'll be easier to live with.

    The type of knife and how sharp to keep it is not a "one size fits all" kind of thing. Different materials are cut better with different types of knives and vice versa. A thin, super sharp blade will cut delicate things and detailed things but won't last long cutting rope, heavy cardboard,, or wood. An ax makes for lousy detail work cutting out stencils.

    Sent from expensive tin cans tied to lots of string.
     
  5. NelsonIII

    NelsonIII Loaded Pockets

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    But a good thing about the Sharpmaker, is that you can attach any grit of sandpaper to the rods. Currently I am using a small diamond coarse stone, simply rubber banded to the rod to do re beveling. So, there are options for the system besides their diamond rods. It is a great system, but has some workable drawbacks. I love mine.
     
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  6. dplafoll

    dplafoll Loaded Pockets

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    I think it depends on your sharpening. If you're getting pretty fine on your sharpener, the black is probably more aggressive than necessary and white/green would be fine. I personally haven't tried the black, but I get the results I want with a Sharpmaker and green/red. Like chmsam said, you can make a strop and you can always make more than one and see what works with what you're doing.
     
  7. James A. Cathcart

    James A. Cathcart Empty Pockets

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    Must...restrain..myself...

    Bad...joke...bursting...out.
     
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  8. dplafoll

    dplafoll Loaded Pockets

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    Lol wow. I didn't realize I'd just softballed them out there like that. :p
     
  9. DeepBlue

    DeepBlue Loaded Pockets

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    Thought I'd just chime in with some experiences here. I've just received the Lansky Delux (5 stones) as a present and have just successfully sharpened a small knife (Fallkniven TK4) that has very hard steel (their 3G steel). This knife had been annoying me because I couldn't get it sharp and I'm usually pretty good with reliable sharpening. Turned out that one of the bevels was really bad (concave) and the other was fine. I couldn't really get the edge sharp because the good side was giving a bit of an edge but I was having little effect on the other.

    I've re-ground the edge at 20 degrees using the Lansky. Starting with the coarse and right through to the ultra fine stones. You have to work with the coarse until you have completely made the new bevel to the cutting edge. Only then you you switch to each of the other stones in turn. The 'right' sharpening technique is that the work is done by the coarsest stone and then each subsequent stone only then removes the scratches from the previous (no more). Thus, less work is done by each subsequent stone and eventually you have a mirror polish ans a razor sharp edge. Subsequent sharpenings can be done with less course stones because not so much work needs to be done.

    Same principle applies to getting scratches out of the main blade (or even sanding wood). Use a stone/paper sufficient to get the scratch out and work your way down to polish. Starting with fine just takes forever.

    Lansky does work well because it allows the angle set constantly which can be hard if you have a lot of work to do. It also makes the bevel very distinct and easy to see if there is an issue (as I had). For super hard steel, I suspect diamond would be best. The coarsest Lansky stone did the job but wasn't super fast. The rest of the stones were fine though at putting on the edge once the coarse had done its work.

    As you have the system I suggest you get the coarsest diamond hone and start with that and then augment down to the ultra fine. It gives a near mirror edge. (I'm going to get the coarse Diamond for some other jobs.).

    Do also make sure you have the rods set up properly!

    Good luck.