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A Folder As Strong As A Fixed Blade? Fact or Gimmick

Discussion in 'Knives' started by that_stupid_kydd, Dec 30, 2014.

  1. smokingfish

    smokingfish Loaded Pockets

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    I think if you need to abuse a folder, you should get an overbuilt folder instead of a normal use folder and complain it doesn't handle up to fixed blade tasks. There's plenty of good looking heavy blades with beefy locks.
    My personal belief is, if you know how to use a blade, almost any will do.
     
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  2. pathwinder14

    pathwinder14 Loaded Pockets

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    Videos of folder abuse do not prove they are a strong as a fixed blade, even if they do perform well. Those tests are not carried out over years of abuse. That's the rub. The REAL reason folders are not as tough as fixed blades is because over time, repeated spine whacks and repeated batoning will cause the pivot to fail. It's simple engineering and phiyics. The fixed blade has no pivot (read "hinge") to fail like folders do.
     
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  3. blacmud8

    blacmud8 Loaded Pockets

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    Surely a failure of a folder is more dangerous as the pivot guides the blade towards your fingers, whereas in the instance of a failure of a fixed blade, it just breaks and so becomes detached and is not (necessarily) guided towards you. So in the instance of failure with either, regardless of which is most likely to fail, a fixed is probably safer.
     
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  4. BlueTrain

    BlueTrain Loaded Pockets

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    I think that a folding knife is more likely to fail at some point not because it's a folding knife but rather because the blade's likely to be thinner than a fixed blade knife. But that's all based on what's "typical." I have one knife that's probably 3/8" thick in the blade, yet I use my Bucklite folding knife (don't think this model is made anymore) with an almost 4" blade when I going to do some rough cutting. My standard test is cutting carpeting.

    There's only been one knife broken at our house and it was a full-tang knife. But there have been many pocket knives that have been lost or otherwise disappeared. They'll probably turn up when we move someday.

    I've never tried to split wood with a knife or chop anything. You don't really even chop vegetables with a kitchen knife--you slice them. Use a cleaver for chopping. It's not good for anything else. Also don't use a knife as a chisel or a pry bar. That's what screwdrivers are for!

    All of this is intended to give you an excuse for buying more blades.
     
    Adahn likes this.
  5. Airborne 1

    Airborne 1 Loaded Pockets

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    Folding knife = Broken knife...no argument...Don't show me that abused K-Bar any more ..It means nothing !

    2 Panther
     
  6. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    Interesting. Also interesting mix of +/- comments on YouTube about how the test was/wasn't biased, etc etc. Main thing that came to me was this. Most of the folders we all look at are either the 'tactical' or the 'traditional'. So many of the 'tactical' seem to have as one of the highest design priorities that they be fast opening and ready for a fight. For most of the traditionals, at least the ones I know of, the design criteria seem to be primarily leaning towards folding for convenience of carry and use for slicing/cutting some pretty obvious materials -- rarely anything like sheet steel. So neither are present day tactical nor traditional folders are designed usually with as much 'beefy' steel especially in the pivot.

    This knife looks like it was designed to fold as a convenience for bushcraft. Not at all for quickdraw as in tactical -- even if the video shows a OHO deployment, really slow compared to tacticals like for instance an Emerson wave, a BK, or a Spyderco. In other words the knife was designed for durability rather than speed. And just maybe to ridicule the CS type video? :p

    All I'm saying is this knife looks interesting; doesn't really prove anything in the context of the current thread because it was designed with a different set of criteria in mind, at least to my perception from the video. I could be way off base; I've just voicing an opinion...

    L'chaim

    Moshe ben David
     
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  7. Evil D

    Evil D Loaded Pockets

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    Eh, this debate is like peeing in the wind ya know. CS recently did their ridiculous lock test garbage on this knife and eventually broke it. I don't recall (nor care) what knife they put it up against, but yeah they "defeated it". You can split hairs a million different ways with this topic, and if we start debating about how easily a knife is opened or how convenient it is, then you're straying from the path of strictly speaking about what is the strongest folder. It's just like with cars, when you start talking about top speed, we can just say top fuel cars go over 300mph in 1000 feet so they're the best right? Oh, well they can't turn and they destroy their pistons making one pass, so they don't make much of a daily driver, so lets talk about this car over here...and so on and so forth.
     
  8. Airborne 1

    Airborne 1 Loaded Pockets

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    Let's not forget that 99% of the people that do reviews ,Have never been in combat long enough to get a CIB.


    2 Panther
     
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